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Attend festivals, performances, exhibits, workshops and more! Use simple filters to find specific types of events near you.

Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event

ARTISTS

STG Presents & LJ Productions Welcomes Knockout de Risas Ft. El Consteño, El Norteño & Gustavo Munguia at The Moore Theatre on Friday, September 17, 2021.

This show will be performed in Spanish.

LJ Productions trae para ti el tour de “Knockout de Risas”. No te puedes perder a los comediantes mas reconocidos en México.

Con más de quince años de experiencia Edson Zúñiga conocido como El Norteño, Javier Carranza como El Costeño, y Gustavo Munguía como Paúl Yester representando a todos los meseros del mundo. Dos horas garantizadas de mucha diversión donde no pararás de reír. Un evento para toda la familia. No te lo pierdas este 17 de Septiembre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Seattle Center Festál
virtual

Seattle Center Festál presents Sea Mar Fiestas Patrias in partnership with Sea Mar Community Health Centers.

Sea Mar Fiestas Patrias commemorates the independence of Latin American countries, many of which celebrate their national independence day in the month of September. It is a festival to celebrate history, while taking pride in the new generations of Latinos who now call the United States home.

Throughout the two-day event at Seattle Center, attendees can enjoy delicious traditional Latin American food and cooking demonstrations, live music, traditional folk dance performances, art exhibitions representing Latino culture, free health screenings, children’s activities and more.

This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Seattle Center Festál
virtual

Seattle Center Festál presents Sea Mar Fiestas Patrias in partnership with Sea Mar Community Health Centers.

Sea Mar Fiestas Patrias commemorates the independence of Latin American countries, many of which celebrate their national independence day in the month of September. It is a festival to celebrate history, while taking pride in the new generations of Latinos who now call the United States home.

Throughout the two-day event at Seattle Center, attendees can enjoy delicious traditional Latin American food and cooking demonstrations, live music, traditional folk dance performances, art exhibitions representing Latino culture, free health screenings, children’s activities and more.

This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Northwest African American Museum (NAAM)
virtual

Learn about historically black colleagues and universities and the benefits of attending an HBCU! Hear from HBCU alumnae, college representatives and partnering organizations. including  the United Netro College Fund (UNCF) and notable speakers. Attendees will have  an opportunity to ask presenters.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event

ABOUT HERBIE HANCOCK

Herbie Hancock is a true icon of modern music. Throughout his explorations, he has transcended limitations and genres while maintaining his unmistakable voice. With an illustrious career spanning five decades and 14 Grammy® Awards, including Album of the Year for River: The Joni Letters, he continues to amaze audiences across the globe.

There are few artists in the music industry who have had more influence on acoustic and electronic jazz and R&B than Herbie Hancock. As the immortal Miles Davis said in his autobiography, “Herbie was the step after Bud Powell and Thelonious Monk, and I haven’t heard anybody yet who has come after him.”

Born in Chicago in 1940, Herbie was a child piano prodigy who performed a Mozart piano concerto with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra at age 11. He began playing jazz in high school, initially influenced by Oscar Peterson and Bill Evans. He also developed a passion for electronics and science, and double-majored in music and electrical engineering at Grinnell College.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Seattle Center Festál

The organizational mission is as follows: “Whereas: Italians and Italian-Americans have made significant contributions to the economic, social and cultural development of the world; Therefore: Festa Italiana, Inc. hereby commits to promote Italian heritage and culture by means of education, preservation and celebration.” The festival achieves these goals each year by presenting Festa Italiana, a series of events in Seattle running from late September through early October, culminating in a major community festival at the Seattle Center. Festa events focus on the cultural roots and history of Italians in America and the Northwest, and celebrate the arts, the food and the spirit that is uniquely Italian.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Casa Latina
Virtual

ROOTED & RESILLIENT

Music & Dance Lessons at 6:30 PM • Program at 7:00 PM (PDT)

Join us for the celebration with music and inspiring speakers and support the advancement of the power of Latino immigrants through employment, education, and community organizing.

We’ve partnered with Latino-owned Café con Leche to bring you a festive Cuban meal to enjoy during the Gala! More details are below.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Seattle Center Festál

The organizational mission is as follows: “Whereas: Italians and Italian-Americans have made significant contributions to the economic, social and cultural development of the world; Therefore: Festa Italiana, Inc. hereby commits to promote Italian heritage and culture by means of education, preservation and celebration.” The festival achieves these goals each year by presenting Festa Italiana, a series of events in Seattle running from late September through early October, culminating in a major community festival at the Seattle Center. Festa events focus on the cultural roots and history of Italians in America and the Northwest, and celebrate the arts, the food and the spirit that is uniquely Italian.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
North American Post

The Seattle Japanese American Citizens League marks its 100th anniversary this month. To commemorate the centennial, the chapter developed a set of nine banner posters highlighting the organization’s civil rights history. Spearheaded by Bill Tashima, poster committee chair and former board member, they recently recovered “parts of our history that were in danger of being lost forever.”

Owing to COVID-19, the centennial was kicked off by the poster committee previewing the project to a small gathering of board members, external participants, and a few friends at Terry’s Kitchen on Friday, August 27.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience

Over 40 years, Vietnamese refugees and immigrants have built a life and established roots in America, against all odds. Now the younger generation strives to shape their own story, not solely defined by the war that brought their parents here.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

This collection of photographs and artwork testifies to the atrocities of the Khmer Rouge holocaust and honors the rich, enduring culture of the Cambodian people.

View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Through personal stories and photographs, experience the many layers of Filipino American history and identity. This cultural legacy lives on in the Filipino community and beyond.

View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event

As well as exploring what we mean by board diversity, what the role of a board is, and how you pick the right board.

Learn how you can recruit board-ready diverse candidates from the GlobalMindED, Amazon, and business community. If you are a diverse leader who wants to join a board, learn to build your board resume to become a candidate for a non-profit, for-profit, public, or private board.

 

View Event

Four crises have faced America in the recent past: the Covid-19 pandemic, the sweeping economic downturn because of it, the strengthening Black Lives Matter movement, and the shaky foundations of democracy under the Trump administration. All those crises came to a head in the murder of George Floyd. He was infected with Covid-19 at the time of his death. He had been laid off from the restaurant he worked at. He was a victim of racism in a time when the President all but tried to erase the work done by the president before him, Barack Obama.

In Race Against Time, Keith Boykin breaks down the history of systemic racism in our country, something that has transcended political parties and leaders. Boykin contends that America can no longer avoid its long overdue reckoning of its racist past. Ignoring the pleas of Black and brown people, he argues, can no longer be tolerated and, if it continues, the union cannot be saved.

Keith Boykin is a CNN political commentator, New York Times best-selling author, and a former White House aide to President Bill Clinton. He is the co-founder and first board president of the National Black Justice Coalition.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
IN-PERSON Meetings w/ Recruiters ATTENTION – SEATTLE Job and Career Seekers! 100’s of Employment Positions from Major Employers!

About this event

ATTENTION SEATTLE JOB SEEKERS AND CAREER CHANGERS!

The 21st Annual Diversity Employment Day Career Fair and Job Fair for Seattle and State of Washington

Invites you to meet In Person (IP)with Seattle’s major employers and their recruiters, staffing managers, and HR Directors who are seeking to hire for 100’s of Job and Career Positions on September 29th, 2021 from 11 AM to 3 PM.

Email your Resume to FastTrack@CityCareerFair.com with the subject: SEATTLE 2 IP and receive a confirmation code that allows you to join the Annual Diversity Employment Day Career Fair immediately. It is very IMPORTANT that you have the code in the subject line.

This is a professional-level online virtual event and business attire and résumés are required for admission.

This is a FREE event. Must be 18 years or older. Remember – “First Impressions are Lasting Impressions”. Although you may be taking your scheduled appointments in the casual and safe comforts of your home – “Look and Remain Professional” throughout your appointments for best results!

Employers – Reach out to prebook@citycareerfair.com for details regarding participation. Your participation fee helps to support Diversity in the workplace and community plus this Diversity & Inclusion recruiting event. Thank You – CityCareerFair.com

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
IN-PERSON Meetings w/ Recruiters ATTENTION – SEATTLE Job and Career Seekers! 100’s of Employment Positions from Major Employers!

About this event

ATTENTION SEATTLE JOB SEEKERS AND CAREER CHANGERS!

The 21st Annual Diversity Employment Day Career Fair and Job Fair for Seattle and State of Washington

Invites you to meet In Person (IP)with Seattle’s major employers and their recruiters, staffing managers, and HR Directors who are seeking to hire for 100’s of Job and Career Positions on September 29th, 2021 from 11 AM to 3 PM.

Email your Resume to FastTrack@CityCareerFair.com with the subject: SEATTLE 2 IP and receive a confirmation code that allows you to join the Annual Diversity Employment Day Career Fair immediately. It is very IMPORTANT that you have the code in the subject line.

This is a professional-level online virtual event and business attire and résumés are required for admission.

This is a FREE event. Must be 18 years or older. Remember – “First Impressions are Lasting Impressions”. Although you may be taking your scheduled appointments in the casual and safe comforts of your home – “Look and Remain Professional” throughout your appointments for best results!

Employers – Reach out to prebook@citycareerfair.com for details regarding participation. Your participation fee helps to support Diversity in the workplace and community plus this Diversity & Inclusion recruiting event. Thank You – CityCareerFair.com

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
El Centro de la Raza
virtual

Join us on Saturday, October 2nd for our 2021 Building the Beloved Community Gala and take part in an exciting livestream and online auction that raises funds for vital programs and services that benefit more than 21,000 individuals and families across our region. The evening also includes the presentation of our Roberto Felipe Maestas Legacy Awards & Scholarships. Registration is free and signing up takes just a few minutes

View Event

With influences from salsa, R&B, Chicano Rock, Mexican musica ranchera, and international pop, Quetzal brings musical stories of culture, politics, and humanity to the Main Stage this fall.

From lush ballads to barn-burning Jarocho Rock songs with unstoppable zapateado (foot stomping), the Grammy award-winning group has graced stages around the world for nearly three decades.

Quetzal was founded in the 1990s by guitarist Quetzal Flores and an ensemble of talented musicians, bolstered by the powerhouse vocals and songwriting of Dr. Martha Gonzales. Quetzal emerged out of a particularly contentious time during the 1990s, spurred by events like the 1992 Los Angeles uprising, the 1994 Proposition 187 campaign (to deny medical and public services to undocumented immigrants and public education to undocumented children), and the Zapatista insurrection in Mexico. The group of Artivists began to use music as a creative expression of voice for marginalized people, resistance to conditions of oppression, and as a proactive response to the problems impacting communities in East L.A.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Seattle Center Festál
virtual

Seattle Center Festál presents CroatiaFest in partnership with CroatiaFest. The festival is held annually on the first Sunday of October. The festival presents Croatian culture through music and dance performances by the finest Croatian musicians, singers and dance ensembles from the Pacific Northwest, Canada and beyond. Museum quality exhibits tell the story of the Croatian American immigrant experience through historical photos, artifacts, traditional costumes and folk instruments. Croatian gifts and merchandise are available for purchase from a variety of vendors in the marketplace. Attendees can enjoy cooking demonstrations of traditional foods by Croatian chefs. Numerous booths feature authentic Croatian cuisine, crafts for kids, genealogy and informative lectures and craft demonstrations. Visitors can enjoy a tasting of wines from various Croatian American vintners from Washington and California in the CroatiaFest Wine Cellars. The office of the Croatian Consulate assists with passports, visas and official government documents. Festivities begin in the Seattle Center Armory with opening ceremonies at noon.

This event is free and open to the public.

View Event

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Join the Tacoma Art Museum for an exclusive conversation with the Kinseys as they discuss the Harlem Renaissance, its place in the The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection, and how the spirit of community and collaboration continues to shape Black art into the present day.

Please plan to arrive on time or early, we will release seats at 2 pm.

This program will be held in our event space just off the lobby with easy access from both entrances to the museum. The lecture will be recorded and available to view on our YouTube channel after the event.

View Event

Colorful, culturally-diverse violin compositions

Philharmonia Northwest invites us to their dazzling season opener “Prismatic Colors,” a celebration of musical colors from various cultural backgrounds and eras. Soloist Amber Archibald performs the Carl Stamitz’s vibrant Viola Concerto in D Major Op.1, along with Edward Elgar’s melodic Serenade for Strings, Gabriela Lena Frank’s Peruvian-inspired Five Scenes, and Béla Bartók’s rousing Romanian Folk Dances

Amber Archibald is a violinist who has played around in the Puget Sound area since 2008, including performances with the Seattle Symphony, Seattle Opera, and several chamber music opportunities. She has taught at Seattle University and Seattle Pacific University and now lives in Texas, where her career continues with solo engagements, chamber music, and a robust teaching career.

Philharmonia Northwest contributes to the vitality of the classical music community in the Pacific Northwest through professional-level concerts that highlight the diverse past and present repertoire for chamber orchestra. It is dedicated to promoting local composers and performers, and its outreach programs educate and inspire musicians and audiences of all ages.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
National Nordic Museum
Virtual

Join us for a virtual story time and craft geared toward preschool aged children and their grown-ups!

This month’s book is Maya’s World: Izak of Lapland, by the renowned American poet Maya Angelou. In this story, Maya introduces us to Izak from Sápmi, who loves reindeer. Which is good, since he comes from a family of reindeer herders and even has a pet reindeer, named Totti! It is up to Izak to teach his little brother all about responsibility. Join us for Virtual Nordic Stories to hear more!

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event

Our annual UNITY campaign kicked-off Juneteenth and will continue through the summer, culminating in a virtual event on Thursday evening, October 7 featuring Black art—a showcase of music, dance, poetry, and painting.

Your gift fuels NAAM’s mission to celebrate and center Black history, art & culture and to advance equity, education & empowerment.

Click here to learn what your donation makes possible.

View Event

Virtual passes are on sale now for Activate | Refuge, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival, October 7-17.

Presented by the Social Justice Film Institute, Northwest Film Forum, and the Meaningful Movies Project, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival is a virtual celebration of the power of people and film to push for change within their homes and communities.

This year’s program runs from October 7-17 and features a competitive, curated selection of short and feature films that highlight many of today’s key human crises. Taken together, the genre-spanning films ask how we activate and create refuge in response to crisis.

*** As of September 16, 2021, the Social Justice Film Festival has made the difficult decision to be online-only this year. ***

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

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Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

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Seattle Latino Film Festival

Language: Spanish | English subtitles

Cast: Martín Slipak, Roberto Birindelli, Carlos Frasca, Verónica Perrotta, Jorge Temponi, Jenny Galvan, Guillermo Arengo, Josefina Trías, César Troncoso, Robert Moré

Overview: Claudio is the new insurance expert in a small town far from the capital. It seems like a simple job, but when he arrives, he is faced with the worst series of intentional car fires the town had ever seen. Cornered by clients, Claudio must discover what and who is behind the attacks, without being able to trust anything or anyone.

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Virtual passes are on sale now for Activate | Refuge, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival, October 7-17.

Presented by the Social Justice Film Institute, Northwest Film Forum, and the Meaningful Movies Project, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival is a virtual celebration of the power of people and film to push for change within their homes and communities.

This year’s program runs from October 7-17 and features a competitive, curated selection of short and feature films that highlight many of today’s key human crises. Taken together, the genre-spanning films ask how we activate and create refuge in response to crisis.

*** As of September 16, 2021, the Social Justice Film Festival has made the difficult decision to be online-only this year. ***

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Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Seattle Center Festál
virtual

Seattle Center Festál presents Turkfest in partnership with the Turkish American Cultural Association of Washington (TACAWA). The festival boasts a lively marketplace, food, music, dance, and more.

Turkfest is an annual cultural festival in Seattle, whose mission is to foster friendship, to highlight the diversity and richness of Turkish culture and Turkish speaking countries, and cooperate throughout the greater community by organizing educational, entertaining, and engaging cultural programs that celebrate Turkish and Turkic cultures and heritage.

This event is free and open to the public.

View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Seattle Latino Film Festival
Seattle, WA

Language: English
Cast: Fatima Ptacek, Melissa Leo, Mia Frampton, Mia Xitali, Cristela Alonzo, Ciara Bravo

Synopsis: Desperate to escape the trappings of her small coastal farming town, 16-year-old Abby falls for the lead singer of a touring rock band and must decide whether or not to leave her family and friends behind. With live music performances and an exciting ensemble cast, COAST is about female friendships, finding your truth and letting the music take you home.

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Seattle Latino Film Festival
Seattle, WA

Language: Spanish | English subtitles
Cast: Luis Baralt

Synopsis: A grocer tries to save the radio that accompanied him for practically his entire life. His pilgrimage through the streets in search of a solution confronts him with a city that has accepted the disappearance of ways of life and the loss of scenes from the past in the memory.

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Seattle Latino Film Festival
Seattle, WA

Language: Spanish & Italian | English subtitles
Cast: Claudia Rojas, Christian González, Erick Palacios, Diana Volpe, Alberto Alifa

Synopsis: Eugenia, 17, wants to leave chaotic and crisis-ridden Venezuela,. To obtain the long-awaited European passport, she goes on a 500 km road trip in search of her unknown Italian grandfather. Her road partner is Luis, an intriguing and inaccessible young man, with whom she lives a brief and tragic teen love. He accompanies her with promise of an appointment in Rome, 13 years later.

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Seattle Latino Film Festival

Synopsis: This story follows Eva, a traveler who experiences some car trouble and ends up spending some time with a group of women in a hotel outside of town. These women gladly accept Eva in their home and make her feel at ease. Quickly, Eva discovers the secret that unifies these seven interesting women she has  met.  As relationships develop, an even deeper relationship  is formed between Eva and Liz. As they go on different adventures, Liz’s  long kept secret  is revealed and it takes a toll on everyone involved. It is worthy to note that there are not many male characters in this film. This leaves room for these women to show their own strengths and skills thereby revealing their true natures  as vibrant women living their lives.

Language : Spanish w/ English Subtitles

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Town Hall is proud to partner with The Bushwick Book Club Seattle for its twelfth mainstage season presenting concerts of original music inspired by literature. Each event showcases a lineup of local, professional musicians and artists each offering a fresh response to that evening’s source text, plus extras like an audience quiz, short film, or scholarly introduction. Book choices range from whimsical to solemn, classic to contemporary, and most every place in between.

This event will feature original music and art inspired by Nnedi Okorafor’s Akata Witch.

For Sunny, 12-years-old and albino, her arrival in Nigeria from America was shocking enough—until she discovers herself smack in the middle of a world of indescribable magic.

Akata Witch is a spectacular tale of a young woman coming to power in a truly global environment.” –Ms. Magazine

View Event

Virtual passes are on sale now for Activate | Refuge, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival, October 7-17.

Presented by the Social Justice Film Institute, Northwest Film Forum, and the Meaningful Movies Project, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival is a virtual celebration of the power of people and film to push for change within their homes and communities.

This year’s program runs from October 7-17 and features a competitive, curated selection of short and feature films that highlight many of today’s key human crises. Taken together, the genre-spanning films ask how we activate and create refuge in response to crisis.

*** As of September 16, 2021, the Social Justice Film Festival has made the difficult decision to be online-only this year. ***

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Event
Organization
Location
Bainbridge Island Japanese-American Community (BIJAC)
, WA

Honor Thy Mother is the untold story of 36 Aboriginal women from Canada and Native women from tribes in Washington and Alaska who migrated to Bainbridge Island, the traditional territory of the Suquamish people, in the early 1940s. They came, some still in their teens, to pick berries for Japanese American farmers. Many, just released from the Indian Residential Schools, fell in love in the berry fields and married Filipino immigrants. Despite having left their homeland and possible disenfranchisement from their tribes, they settled on the Island to raise their mixed heritage (Indipino) children. The voices of the Indipino children, now elders, are integral in the storytelling of their mother’s experiences marrying Asian men and settling in a distant land. They share their confusion of growing up with no sense of belonging in either culture and raised in poverty as the children of berry farmers, some with no running water, electricity or indoor plumbing. In a post-World War II racist environment, they grew up in homes burdened with their father and mother’s memory of the 227 Bainbridge Island Japanese Americans forcibly removed from their homes after President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 on February 19th, 1942. Brought to light, in the oral history interviews of the Indipino elders, is the effect that historical trauma has on children, more specifically children whose mothers survived Indian Residential Schools.

Honor Thy Mother will be screened at the Bainbridge High School Theater Auditorium on October 10th at 3:45pm. Tickets are available now on Eventbrite. Tickets are free, but donations are gratefully accepted.

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In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Seattle Center Festál
virtual

Seattle Center Festál presents Turkfest in partnership with the Turkish American Cultural Association of Washington (TACAWA). The festival boasts a lively marketplace, food, music, dance, and more.

Turkfest is an annual cultural festival in Seattle, whose mission is to foster friendship, to highlight the diversity and richness of Turkish culture and Turkish speaking countries, and cooperate throughout the greater community by organizing educational, entertaining, and engaging cultural programs that celebrate Turkish and Turkic cultures and heritage.

This event is free and open to the public.

View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Virtual passes are on sale now for Activate | Refuge, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival, October 7-17.

Presented by the Social Justice Film Institute, Northwest Film Forum, and the Meaningful Movies Project, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival is a virtual celebration of the power of people and film to push for change within their homes and communities.

This year’s program runs from October 7-17 and features a competitive, curated selection of short and feature films that highlight many of today’s key human crises. Taken together, the genre-spanning films ask how we activate and create refuge in response to crisis.

*** As of September 16, 2021, the Social Justice Film Festival has made the difficult decision to be online-only this year. ***

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Seattle Indian Health Board
virtual

Seattle Center Festál presents Indigenous People Festival in partnership with Seattle Indian Health Board (SIHB). The festival provides a venue for Native people to celebrate their unique cultures through song, dance, performances, art, food, and the sharing of indigenous knowledge.

View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Virtual passes are on sale now for Activate | Refuge, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival, October 7-17.

Presented by the Social Justice Film Institute, Northwest Film Forum, and the Meaningful Movies Project, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival is a virtual celebration of the power of people and film to push for change within their homes and communities.

This year’s program runs from October 7-17 and features a competitive, curated selection of short and feature films that highlight many of today’s key human crises. Taken together, the genre-spanning films ask how we activate and create refuge in response to crisis.

*** As of September 16, 2021, the Social Justice Film Festival has made the difficult decision to be online-only this year. ***

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Seattle Indian Health Board
virtual

Join us for a celebration of Indigenous creativity and brilliance!

Indigenous People Festival is a free annual event that creates space for Indigenous people to celebrate artistry and traditions and for all attendees to learn about Indigenous cultures from a lineup of contemporary talent.

Virtual Performances by NDN Artists

This year, we’ll present four exciting days of virtual performances and panels featuring locally and nationally recognized Indigenous artists and advocates.

In partnership with Seattle Center, the event will be streamed live on our Facebook and YouTube.

View Event

The police cannot be reformed. This is the assertion of human rights lawyer Derecka Purnell. Instead, she believes, new systems need to be created to address the root causes of violence. Since the police cannot be reformed, they should be abolished.

In Becoming Abolitionists, Purnell highlights social movements and activists through time and space, the lessons learned from them, and the elements of policing that no longer serve us. From South Africa to Ferguson, Missouri (where the Black Lives Matter movement was ignited after the police shooting death of the unarmed Black teenager, Michael Brown); from Reconstruction to contemporary protests against police shootings, Purnell looks at the roots of police reform and the ways it has failed and will continue to fail. Instead, Purnell asserts, society needs to eliminate its reliance on policing. The prison-industrial complex must be dissolved. Communities must rebuild labor organizing and disrupt wealth inequality. Laws must be passed around prison labor, voting rights, gun ownership, campaign finance, and decriminalize thousands of behaviors. Social workers and mental health experts need to be on the front lines. This all is a daunting list to get through. It might not be done tomorrow, but, again, a young Black life might be lost tomorrow.

View Event

Virtual passes are on sale now for Activate | Refuge, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival, October 7-17.

Presented by the Social Justice Film Institute, Northwest Film Forum, and the Meaningful Movies Project, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival is a virtual celebration of the power of people and film to push for change within their homes and communities.

This year’s program runs from October 7-17 and features a competitive, curated selection of short and feature films that highlight many of today’s key human crises. Taken together, the genre-spanning films ask how we activate and create refuge in response to crisis.

*** As of September 16, 2021, the Social Justice Film Festival has made the difficult decision to be online-only this year. ***

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Seattle Indian Health Board
virtual

Join us for a celebration of Indigenous creativity and brilliance!

Indigenous People Festival is a free annual event that creates space for Indigenous people to celebrate artistry and traditions and for all attendees to learn about Indigenous cultures from a lineup of contemporary talent.

Virtual Performances by NDN Artists

This year, we’ll present four exciting days of virtual performances and panels featuring locally and nationally recognized Indigenous artists and advocates.

In partnership with Seattle Center, the event will be streamed live on our Facebook and YouTube.

View Event

Virtual passes are on sale now for Activate | Refuge, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival, October 7-17.

Presented by the Social Justice Film Institute, Northwest Film Forum, and the Meaningful Movies Project, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival is a virtual celebration of the power of people and film to push for change within their homes and communities.

This year’s program runs from October 7-17 and features a competitive, curated selection of short and feature films that highlight many of today’s key human crises. Taken together, the genre-spanning films ask how we activate and create refuge in response to crisis.

*** As of September 16, 2021, the Social Justice Film Festival has made the difficult decision to be online-only this year. ***

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Seattle Indian Health Board
virtual

Join us for a celebration of Indigenous creativity and brilliance!

Indigenous People Festival is a free annual event that creates space for Indigenous people to celebrate artistry and traditions and for all attendees to learn about Indigenous cultures from a lineup of contemporary talent.

Virtual Performances by NDN Artists

This year, we’ll present four exciting days of virtual performances and panels featuring locally and nationally recognized Indigenous artists and advocates.

In partnership with Seattle Center, the event will be streamed live on our Facebook and YouTube.

View Event

Virtual passes are on sale now for Activate | Refuge, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival, October 7-17.

Presented by the Social Justice Film Institute, Northwest Film Forum, and the Meaningful Movies Project, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival is a virtual celebration of the power of people and film to push for change within their homes and communities.

This year’s program runs from October 7-17 and features a competitive, curated selection of short and feature films that highlight many of today’s key human crises. Taken together, the genre-spanning films ask how we activate and create refuge in response to crisis.

*** As of September 16, 2021, the Social Justice Film Festival has made the difficult decision to be online-only this year. ***

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Seattle Indian Health Board
virtual

Join us for a celebration of Indigenous creativity and brilliance!

Indigenous People Festival is a free annual event that creates space for Indigenous people to celebrate artistry and traditions and for all attendees to learn about Indigenous cultures from a lineup of contemporary talent.

Virtual Performances by NDN Artists

This year, we’ll present four exciting days of virtual performances and panels featuring locally and nationally recognized Indigenous artists and advocates.

In partnership with Seattle Center, the event will be streamed live on our Facebook and YouTube.

View Event
Earshot Jazz Society of Seattle
Seattle, WA

Virtual passes are on sale now for Activate | Refuge, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival, October 7-17.

Presented by the Social Justice Film Institute, Northwest Film Forum, and the Meaningful Movies Project, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival is a virtual celebration of the power of people and film to push for change within their homes and communities.

This year’s program runs from October 7-17 and features a competitive, curated selection of short and feature films that highlight many of today’s key human crises. Taken together, the genre-spanning films ask how we activate and create refuge in response to crisis.

*** As of September 16, 2021, the Social Justice Film Festival has made the difficult decision to be online-only this year. ***

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Virtual passes are on sale now for Activate | Refuge, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival, October 7-17.

Presented by the Social Justice Film Institute, Northwest Film Forum, and the Meaningful Movies Project, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival is a virtual celebration of the power of people and film to push for change within their homes and communities.

This year’s program runs from October 7-17 and features a competitive, curated selection of short and feature films that highlight many of today’s key human crises. Taken together, the genre-spanning films ask how we activate and create refuge in response to crisis.

*** As of September 16, 2021, the Social Justice Film Festival has made the difficult decision to be online-only this year. ***

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

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Join us for NAAM’s next Descendants Series program – a virtual afternoon with Tina Wyatt, Great-Great-Great-Grandniece of Harriet Tubman.

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Virtual passes are on sale now for Activate | Refuge, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival, October 7-17.

Presented by the Social Justice Film Institute, Northwest Film Forum, and the Meaningful Movies Project, the 2021 Social Justice Film Festival is a virtual celebration of the power of people and film to push for change within their homes and communities.

This year’s program runs from October 7-17 and features a competitive, curated selection of short and feature films that highlight many of today’s key human crises. Taken together, the genre-spanning films ask how we activate and create refuge in response to crisis.

*** As of September 16, 2021, the Social Justice Film Festival has made the difficult decision to be online-only this year. ***

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Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Seattle Center Festál
virtual

Diwali (Festival of Lights) is a major cultural celebration observed throughout India every fall. It symbolizes the victory of light over darkness, good over evil, and knowledge over ignorance. Light is a metaphor for knowledge and consciousness. During Diwali in India, houses and business locations are brightly illuminated with lamps, diyas (oil lamps), and candles. Lakshmi, the Goddess of Wealth, is worshiped for prosperity. Diwali is celebrated with families and friends, wearing new clothes, partaking in family feasts, enjoying delicious sweets, sharing gifts and most importantly, setting off firecrackers!

Seattle Center Festál presents Diwali: Lights of India in partnership with Northwest Share. This year’s virtual festival features music, dance, visual art, martial arts, a cooking demonstration and more.

This event is free and open to the public.

View Event

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

In The Viking Heart, Arthur Herman melds a compelling historical narrative with cutting-edge archaeological discoveries and DNA research to trace the epic story of this remarkable and truly diverse people. He shows how the Scandinavian experience has universal meaning, and how we can still be inspired by their indomitable spirit and the strength of their community bonds, much needed in our deeply polarized society today. The Vikings’ lives “teach us a lesson of how shared culture and community—the foundation of the Viking heart—can empower us all in the midst of disruptive change and even chaos. Modern Scandinavians have retained those teachings . . . and forged a path that points the way forward for all of us, including in today’s America.”

Cost: Free for Members; $5 general admission

About the series:

Meet the Author is an intimate series of virtual book talks that introduces you to some of the best Nordic authors. With a wide range of topics and authors lined up, this is a series you don’t want to miss. Each talk is moderated by Dr. Elizabeth DeNoma and includes an opportunity to ask questions to the authors.

About the author:

Arthur Herman is Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of nine books, including the New York Times bestseller How the Scots Invented the Modern World and Gandhi and Churchill, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Seattle Center Festál
virtual

The Hmong people are an ethnic group who have maintained their own language, customs and ways of life, while adopting the ways of the country they live in, since the Hmong do not have a country of their own. The Hmong New Year Celebration was created to give thanks to ancestors and welcome a new beginning. This is the biggest festive holiday celebrated where Hmong communities exist. Traditionally, this celebration lasts for ten days, but has been shortened in the U.S. Everyone dresses in traditional Hmong clothing and enjoy traditional food, dance and music. One very popular part of the Hmong New Year is, ‘Pov Pob’ tossing ball between two people, a form of courtship

Seattle Center Festál presents Hmong New Year Celebration in partnership with Hmong Association of Washington (HAW). The festival celebrates the end of the harvest season with intricate clothing, dance, food, and more.

This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event