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Attend festivals, performances, exhibits, workshops and more! Use simple filters to find specific types of events near you.

Event
Organization
Location
Duwamish Longhouse

In place of the Duwamish Annual Gala we are hosting an Online Native Art Auction. Bidding begins November 10th and concluded November 30th at 9pm.

View Event
Tasveer
In person & Virtual

The Tasveer South Asian Film Festival (TSAFF) will take place for an 18-day extravaganza from Nov 3rd-20th, 2022. The festival creates a lively, stimulating and focused environment for conversation, education and exploration of issues that face South Asia and it’s Diaspora.

Through a series of film screenings, panel discussions, workshops, and cultural programming, our goal is to involve audiences not just with the film and video works presented, but to create a prolonged space where the social, political, personal, and international issues that form the core subjects of those works can be discussed and understood.
We want our community to engage with each other and with the society that we live in. We wanted to challenge our community to address the gaps, be they cultural, social, economic, or political. However, it is not only the South Asian community that we believe benefits from our events. Often times, the issues depicted in our films are relevant here in the United States or in other parts of the world.
We are committed to treating all individuals with respect, dignity, and fairness by removing physical, social, and economic barriers to participation. We ensure that all who wish to enjoy TSAFF’s programming can do so.

View Event
Suquamish Tribe
Suquamish, WA

Free admission. Local vendors. Handmade gifts.

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National Nordic Museum
Seattle , WA

The National Nordic Museum’s Julefest takes place the weekend before Thanksgiving on the Museum grounds. Modeled on a traditional outdoor Christmas market, expect all the goodies associated with the Nordic holidays with some Northwest twists!

On November 19-20, 2022, the National Nordic Museum will host its 45th annual Julefest: A Nordic Holiday Celebration. This cultural community event transforms the Museum grounds into a traditional outdoor Nordic market similar to those widely attended throughout the Nordic region.

During Julefest, visitors are immersed in a variety of Nordic holiday traditions. Guests can expect to discover a modern spin on a traditional market as they can shop from over 30+ local artists, taste traditional holiday fare, and enjoy Nordic music and dance performances. Julefest is an affordable and accessible multi-cultural event that draws diverse audiences and educates visitors about Nordic culture and traditions.

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United Indians of All Tribes Foundation (UIATF)
Seattle, WA

Indigenous artists will be selling and showcasing handmade authentic arts and crafts. Beautiful work such as clothing, jewelry, woodworking, drums, art prints, and more by Native American Artists with many styles and tribes represented will be at Daybreak Star. This is a free event open to the public

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Seattle-Kobe Sister City Association
Seattle, WA

Visit the Hyogo-Kobe Fair participating restaurants between November 6 and November 22, 2022! Enjoy dishes in tribute to Kobe’s local cuisine and Japanese sake made in Kobe! Join the sweepstakes to get a $1,000 airfare gift certificate.

View Event
Arbutus Folk School
Olympia, WA

Stop by Arbutus Folk School from 10am to 6pm on November 20th for a fundraiser craft sale with items created by our talented instructors out of clay, wood, wool, and more.

View Event
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Stroum Jewish Community Center
Mercer Island, WA

The J is bringing Hanukkah to you! Join us at the Mercer Island Harvest Market for Hanukkah crafts and holiday fun!  

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Wa Na Wari
Seattle, WA

Join Wa Na Wari for a pan-Afrikan Marketplace. Find unique jewelry, bags, scarves, clothing, unconventional artist materials, home decor, quilts and more!

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My People's Market
Portland, OR

It’s the Market’s 5th birthday and we’re ready to celebrate! Mark your calendar for Saturday and Sunday, November 19-20 and shop from more than 120 vendors at this indoor market. Enjoy perennial market favorites and newcomers, a wellness area, exciting food and beverage options, music and the welcoming vibe you’ve come to expect from My People’s Market.

Registration and tickets required to attend the event.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are really excited to host our amazingly talented and hilarious friend Lalo Alcaraz at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery in November.

View Event
Northwest Danish Association
Seattle, WA

Juleauktion 2022 is the Northwest Danish Association (NWDA) annual fundraising event. This virtual auction offers unique gifts from Denmark, gift certificates to local businesses, vacation stays, art and much more. Browse and bid online!

The auction will help fund community programs by NWDA, including scholarships and eldercare.

The auction will run from November 13th to November 28th. Items may be picked up after December 5th.

All items must be picked up at Northwest Danish Association (1833 N. 105th Street, #101, Seattle, WA 98133). Exceptions may be made for gift certificates and some small items, which can be mailed for a small fee.

View Event
Vashon Center for the Arts
Vashon, WA
The gallery presents an art exhibition “Indigenous Art of the Salish Sea”,  a group show of Native American artists from or working in the Salish sea region; paintings, prints, and glasswork, including work by Dan Friday Kwul Kwul Tw. Most people are familiar with formline art of the Alaskan coastal artists. The Salish Sea artists of our region have their own unique style. Collaborating with Stonington Gallery (Seattle) and local native artists, the exhibition introduces the viewer to the wide variety art styles, both traditional and contemporary, created by Salish Sea artists.
View Event

Indigenous solidarity is an essential part of the struggle for racial and environmental justice. It is critical that we deepen our commitment to Indigenous Sovereignty in ourselves and in our movements, take collective action towards land rematriation and support efforts to ensure a just and sustainable existence for all of our future generations.

Join @Tonatierra, @NDN Collective, @AILAnyc, @Sogoreatelandtrust and the Indigenous Solidarity Network (@_catalystproject_, @showingupforracialjustice, @resourcegeneration) for “Rethinking Thanksgiving: From Land Acknowledgement to LANDBACK” on Sunday, November 20 at 1pm PT/4pm ET. This webinar is an invitation to interrogate so-called Thanksgiving, and move beyond the myths of America’s history with Indigenous Peoples of Turtle Island.

From tar sands pipelines across Turtle Island to Arctic oil and gas drilling, Indigenous campaigns of resistance continue to lead the way in protecting future generations against the destruction of sacred lands and waterways.

Moving into a deeper understanding of how colonialism is embedded into our frameworks and systems builds our capacity to be better allies to Indigenous Peoples. In this webinar, we will hear from the frontlines of Indigenous efforts to resist violence and colonization fueled by the current extractive economic system and gather ways to further and deepen solidarity with Indigenous resistance centering land rematriation.

*Please register at the link below! If the webinar is full on the day of, please watch the livestream on the Facebook pages of co-sponsoring groups. We will be moderating both chats and relaying questions to the panelists live.*

View Event
Charlene Teters
Spokane, WA

Opening Reception: November 4, 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Gallery Talk at 4:30 p.m.
Gonzaga University Urban Art Center (GUUAC) located downtown at 125 S. Stevens Street, 3rd Floor

Panel discussion with “Land Acknowledgement” artists Charlene Teters (Spokane), Tiffanie Irizarry (Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe), and Joeseph Arnoux (Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ)
November 8th at 3:00 p.m.
Hemmingson Ballroom

Exhibit on display November 4 – December 3. Gallery hours at the GUUAC are Fridays 4:00-7:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

View Event
American Romanian Cultural Society - ARCS Project
Seattle, WA

HomeLands, the 2022 edition of the RFF, is a genre-spanning selection of internationally acclaimed movies that, complemented by special guest events and film talks, reflect on themes and events of the past year. The carefully curated program celebrates the power of film to map out new meaning in a world where people have been displaced by wars, economic crises, political instability, and natural disasters. Audiences are asked to redefine their sense of belonging—of homelands—in relation to family, neighbors, home countries, and to the planet itself.

After two successful virtual editions in 2020 and 2021, the festival continues this year in a hybrid format, with virtual programs available nationwide on the web, and with in-person screenings from Nov. 11–13 and Nov. 18–20 at Northwest Film Forum.

The festival is co-organized with ARCS Arizona and ARCS Detroit. It keeps its partnership with the Romanian Film Fest Arizona, whose in-person screenings take place Nov. 19–20 at Majestic Tempe 7 in Tempe, AZ. Poster art for 2022 is by Daniel Ursache.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Duwamish Longhouse

In place of the Duwamish Annual Gala we are hosting an Online Native Art Auction. Bidding begins November 10th and concluded November 30th at 9pm.

View Event
Seattle-Kobe Sister City Association
Seattle, WA

Visit the Hyogo-Kobe Fair participating restaurants between November 6 and November 22, 2022! Enjoy dishes in tribute to Kobe’s local cuisine and Japanese sake made in Kobe! Join the sweepstakes to get a $1,000 airfare gift certificate.

View Event
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are really excited to host our amazingly talented and hilarious friend Lalo Alcaraz at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery in November.

View Event
Northwest Danish Association
Seattle, WA

Juleauktion 2022 is the Northwest Danish Association (NWDA) annual fundraising event. This virtual auction offers unique gifts from Denmark, gift certificates to local businesses, vacation stays, art and much more. Browse and bid online!

The auction will help fund community programs by NWDA, including scholarships and eldercare.

The auction will run from November 13th to November 28th. Items may be picked up after December 5th.

All items must be picked up at Northwest Danish Association (1833 N. 105th Street, #101, Seattle, WA 98133). Exceptions may be made for gift certificates and some small items, which can be mailed for a small fee.

View Event
Vashon Center for the Arts
Vashon, WA
The gallery presents an art exhibition “Indigenous Art of the Salish Sea”,  a group show of Native American artists from or working in the Salish sea region; paintings, prints, and glasswork, including work by Dan Friday Kwul Kwul Tw. Most people are familiar with formline art of the Alaskan coastal artists. The Salish Sea artists of our region have their own unique style. Collaborating with Stonington Gallery (Seattle) and local native artists, the exhibition introduces the viewer to the wide variety art styles, both traditional and contemporary, created by Salish Sea artists.
View Event
Charlene Teters
Spokane, WA

Opening Reception: November 4, 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Gallery Talk at 4:30 p.m.
Gonzaga University Urban Art Center (GUUAC) located downtown at 125 S. Stevens Street, 3rd Floor

Panel discussion with “Land Acknowledgement” artists Charlene Teters (Spokane), Tiffanie Irizarry (Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe), and Joeseph Arnoux (Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ)
November 8th at 3:00 p.m.
Hemmingson Ballroom

Exhibit on display November 4 – December 3. Gallery hours at the GUUAC are Fridays 4:00-7:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

View Event
American Romanian Cultural Society - ARCS Project
Seattle, WA

HomeLands, the 2022 edition of the RFF, is a genre-spanning selection of internationally acclaimed movies that, complemented by special guest events and film talks, reflect on themes and events of the past year. The carefully curated program celebrates the power of film to map out new meaning in a world where people have been displaced by wars, economic crises, political instability, and natural disasters. Audiences are asked to redefine their sense of belonging—of homelands—in relation to family, neighbors, home countries, and to the planet itself.

After two successful virtual editions in 2020 and 2021, the festival continues this year in a hybrid format, with virtual programs available nationwide on the web, and with in-person screenings from Nov. 11–13 and Nov. 18–20 at Northwest Film Forum.

The festival is co-organized with ARCS Arizona and ARCS Detroit. It keeps its partnership with the Romanian Film Fest Arizona, whose in-person screenings take place Nov. 19–20 at Majestic Tempe 7 in Tempe, AZ. Poster art for 2022 is by Daniel Ursache.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event
Chinese Reconciliation Project Foundation (CRPF)
Tacoma, WA

“The Resting Place” tells the story of how the Vietnamese community in Tacoma came together to establish a shared cemetery to honor members who have passed. Through the establishment of the Vietnamese Community for Mutual Support of Pierce County, Washington, leaders in the community partnered with a local cemetery to honor the important passage from life to death.

 

The film is one installment in the Chinese Reconciliation Project Foundation’s “Our Communities, Our Neighbors” film series. Funded by Tacoma Creates, CRPF is working with cultural communities in Tacoma to create short films that tell stories about these communities, shaped through active participation by community members.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Duwamish Longhouse

In place of the Duwamish Annual Gala we are hosting an Online Native Art Auction. Bidding begins November 10th and concluded November 30th at 9pm.

View Event
Seattle-Kobe Sister City Association
Seattle, WA

Visit the Hyogo-Kobe Fair participating restaurants between November 6 and November 22, 2022! Enjoy dishes in tribute to Kobe’s local cuisine and Japanese sake made in Kobe! Join the sweepstakes to get a $1,000 airfare gift certificate.

View Event
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are really excited to host our amazingly talented and hilarious friend Lalo Alcaraz at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery in November.

View Event
Northwest Danish Association
Seattle, WA

Juleauktion 2022 is the Northwest Danish Association (NWDA) annual fundraising event. This virtual auction offers unique gifts from Denmark, gift certificates to local businesses, vacation stays, art and much more. Browse and bid online!

The auction will help fund community programs by NWDA, including scholarships and eldercare.

The auction will run from November 13th to November 28th. Items may be picked up after December 5th.

All items must be picked up at Northwest Danish Association (1833 N. 105th Street, #101, Seattle, WA 98133). Exceptions may be made for gift certificates and some small items, which can be mailed for a small fee.

View Event

Honor Native American Heritage Month with a storywalk for all ages!

The picture book We Are Still Here! by Traci Sorell will be on display from November 1 to November 30 at the Moore, Swasey, and Wheelock branches.

No registration required. Stop by a participating branch during regular open hours. Social distancing is required and masks are strongly encouraged.

View Event
Vashon Center for the Arts
Vashon, WA
The gallery presents an art exhibition “Indigenous Art of the Salish Sea”,  a group show of Native American artists from or working in the Salish sea region; paintings, prints, and glasswork, including work by Dan Friday Kwul Kwul Tw. Most people are familiar with formline art of the Alaskan coastal artists. The Salish Sea artists of our region have their own unique style. Collaborating with Stonington Gallery (Seattle) and local native artists, the exhibition introduces the viewer to the wide variety art styles, both traditional and contemporary, created by Salish Sea artists.
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Charlene Teters
Spokane, WA

Opening Reception: November 4, 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Gallery Talk at 4:30 p.m.
Gonzaga University Urban Art Center (GUUAC) located downtown at 125 S. Stevens Street, 3rd Floor

Panel discussion with “Land Acknowledgement” artists Charlene Teters (Spokane), Tiffanie Irizarry (Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe), and Joeseph Arnoux (Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ)
November 8th at 3:00 p.m.
Hemmingson Ballroom

Exhibit on display November 4 – December 3. Gallery hours at the GUUAC are Fridays 4:00-7:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

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UW First Nations
Seattle, WA

Featuring a buffet-style dinner with traditional foods and performances by Native artists.

View Event
American Romanian Cultural Society - ARCS Project
Seattle, WA

HomeLands, the 2022 edition of the RFF, is a genre-spanning selection of internationally acclaimed movies that, complemented by special guest events and film talks, reflect on themes and events of the past year. The carefully curated program celebrates the power of film to map out new meaning in a world where people have been displaced by wars, economic crises, political instability, and natural disasters. Audiences are asked to redefine their sense of belonging—of homelands—in relation to family, neighbors, home countries, and to the planet itself.

After two successful virtual editions in 2020 and 2021, the festival continues this year in a hybrid format, with virtual programs available nationwide on the web, and with in-person screenings from Nov. 11–13 and Nov. 18–20 at Northwest Film Forum.

The festival is co-organized with ARCS Arizona and ARCS Detroit. It keeps its partnership with the Romanian Film Fest Arizona, whose in-person screenings take place Nov. 19–20 at Majestic Tempe 7 in Tempe, AZ. Poster art for 2022 is by Daniel Ursache.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event
Indigenize Productions
Seattle, WA
Boujee Natives: “No F*cks Giving ” dinner is here!
Do you wanna dine and dance in elegance, and give no f*cks about any colonizer BS holiday?
Then come for the food, wine, poetry, live music, performance & a room full of elegant Native, Black and PoC.
Dress code: YOUR BAD N BOUJEE SELF.
Ticket Info: $50.00, PRESALE ONLY, LIMITED SEATING, SALES END NOV 18!
Ticket valid for dinner, drinks, show, and after party.
Secure your ticket ASAP, link in our bio!
Your No F*cks Giving Experience starts here:
Native Soul Cuisine: Native Inspired Soul Food
Seattle’s only NATIVE AMERICAN inspired Soul food 😋
Jeremy Thunderbird is a Chef, caterer and pop-up Restaurateur.
Location is in the CD, and will be sent to guests upon purchase of tickets.
POETRY BY:
Kayan (Coast Miwok/Paiute/Pomo/Peruvian)
Abigail Echo-Hawk (Pawnee)
MUSIC BY:
theres more (Pawnee)
AFTER THE BANQUET DANCE :
DJ theres more! After our opulent delights, it’s time to shake that opulent ass!
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Duwamish Longhouse

In place of the Duwamish Annual Gala we are hosting an Online Native Art Auction. Bidding begins November 10th and concluded November 30th at 9pm.

View Event
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are really excited to host our amazingly talented and hilarious friend Lalo Alcaraz at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery in November.

View Event
Northwest Danish Association
Seattle, WA

Juleauktion 2022 is the Northwest Danish Association (NWDA) annual fundraising event. This virtual auction offers unique gifts from Denmark, gift certificates to local businesses, vacation stays, art and much more. Browse and bid online!

The auction will help fund community programs by NWDA, including scholarships and eldercare.

The auction will run from November 13th to November 28th. Items may be picked up after December 5th.

All items must be picked up at Northwest Danish Association (1833 N. 105th Street, #101, Seattle, WA 98133). Exceptions may be made for gift certificates and some small items, which can be mailed for a small fee.

View Event
Vashon Center for the Arts
Vashon, WA
The gallery presents an art exhibition “Indigenous Art of the Salish Sea”,  a group show of Native American artists from or working in the Salish sea region; paintings, prints, and glasswork, including work by Dan Friday Kwul Kwul Tw. Most people are familiar with formline art of the Alaskan coastal artists. The Salish Sea artists of our region have their own unique style. Collaborating with Stonington Gallery (Seattle) and local native artists, the exhibition introduces the viewer to the wide variety art styles, both traditional and contemporary, created by Salish Sea artists.
View Event
Charlene Teters
Spokane, WA

Opening Reception: November 4, 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Gallery Talk at 4:30 p.m.
Gonzaga University Urban Art Center (GUUAC) located downtown at 125 S. Stevens Street, 3rd Floor

Panel discussion with “Land Acknowledgement” artists Charlene Teters (Spokane), Tiffanie Irizarry (Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe), and Joeseph Arnoux (Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ)
November 8th at 3:00 p.m.
Hemmingson Ballroom

Exhibit on display November 4 – December 3. Gallery hours at the GUUAC are Fridays 4:00-7:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

View Event
American Romanian Cultural Society - ARCS Project
Seattle, WA

HomeLands, the 2022 edition of the RFF, is a genre-spanning selection of internationally acclaimed movies that, complemented by special guest events and film talks, reflect on themes and events of the past year. The carefully curated program celebrates the power of film to map out new meaning in a world where people have been displaced by wars, economic crises, political instability, and natural disasters. Audiences are asked to redefine their sense of belonging—of homelands—in relation to family, neighbors, home countries, and to the planet itself.

After two successful virtual editions in 2020 and 2021, the festival continues this year in a hybrid format, with virtual programs available nationwide on the web, and with in-person screenings from Nov. 11–13 and Nov. 18–20 at Northwest Film Forum.

The festival is co-organized with ARCS Arizona and ARCS Detroit. It keeps its partnership with the Romanian Film Fest Arizona, whose in-person screenings take place Nov. 19–20 at Majestic Tempe 7 in Tempe, AZ. Poster art for 2022 is by Daniel Ursache.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event
Indigenize Productions
Seattle, WA

“Hey Alexa, play somethign Native.”
We know youve been waiting for this one! Our first burlesque show over pride was so much fun, we knew we would have to do another for you all!
So we are back with a lineup that is so hot youd think you were fancy dancing at a powwow in the sun for 6 hours!
And of course, you know we have to have the BIPoC only INDIGEQUEER dance party afterwards!
IYKYK 🙂

INDIGENIZE PRODUCTIONS  NATIVE HERITAGE MONTH CELEBRATIONS:
Its Native Heritage month, and while we know a month isnt a replacement for LANDBACK, we are still gonna celebrate ourselves! Indigenize has a month of events: 11/11 INDIGEQUEER, 11/22 Boujee Natives: No F**cksgiving, check out our linktree, 11/23 COME AND GET YOUR LOVE – all indigenous burlesque, and 11/30 the Seattle Gay NDN Market!

Performances by

Carson St. Claire
theres more
Leah Moonflower
Matt Lawrence
Whisper de Corvo

Hosted by Andrés José

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Duwamish Longhouse

In place of the Duwamish Annual Gala we are hosting an Online Native Art Auction. Bidding begins November 10th and concluded November 30th at 9pm.

View Event
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are really excited to host our amazingly talented and hilarious friend Lalo Alcaraz at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery in November.

View Event
Northwest Danish Association
Seattle, WA

Juleauktion 2022 is the Northwest Danish Association (NWDA) annual fundraising event. This virtual auction offers unique gifts from Denmark, gift certificates to local businesses, vacation stays, art and much more. Browse and bid online!

The auction will help fund community programs by NWDA, including scholarships and eldercare.

The auction will run from November 13th to November 28th. Items may be picked up after December 5th.

All items must be picked up at Northwest Danish Association (1833 N. 105th Street, #101, Seattle, WA 98133). Exceptions may be made for gift certificates and some small items, which can be mailed for a small fee.

View Event
Idaho Immigrant Resource Alliance
Caldwell, ID

IIRA is partnering with Amano for this years Pozole Para Familias – Pozole for Families.

“Come out on Thanksgiving day and support this great cause by getting yourself some delicious pozole.”

This is Amano’s 3rd Annual Pozole Para Familias. They will be giving away free pozole to all who enter their doors

View Event
Vashon Center for the Arts
Vashon, WA
The gallery presents an art exhibition “Indigenous Art of the Salish Sea”,  a group show of Native American artists from or working in the Salish sea region; paintings, prints, and glasswork, including work by Dan Friday Kwul Kwul Tw. Most people are familiar with formline art of the Alaskan coastal artists. The Salish Sea artists of our region have their own unique style. Collaborating with Stonington Gallery (Seattle) and local native artists, the exhibition introduces the viewer to the wide variety art styles, both traditional and contemporary, created by Salish Sea artists.
View Event
Charlene Teters
Spokane, WA

Opening Reception: November 4, 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Gallery Talk at 4:30 p.m.
Gonzaga University Urban Art Center (GUUAC) located downtown at 125 S. Stevens Street, 3rd Floor

Panel discussion with “Land Acknowledgement” artists Charlene Teters (Spokane), Tiffanie Irizarry (Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe), and Joeseph Arnoux (Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ)
November 8th at 3:00 p.m.
Hemmingson Ballroom

Exhibit on display November 4 – December 3. Gallery hours at the GUUAC are Fridays 4:00-7:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

View Event
American Romanian Cultural Society - ARCS Project
Seattle, WA

HomeLands, the 2022 edition of the RFF, is a genre-spanning selection of internationally acclaimed movies that, complemented by special guest events and film talks, reflect on themes and events of the past year. The carefully curated program celebrates the power of film to map out new meaning in a world where people have been displaced by wars, economic crises, political instability, and natural disasters. Audiences are asked to redefine their sense of belonging—of homelands—in relation to family, neighbors, home countries, and to the planet itself.

After two successful virtual editions in 2020 and 2021, the festival continues this year in a hybrid format, with virtual programs available nationwide on the web, and with in-person screenings from Nov. 11–13 and Nov. 18–20 at Northwest Film Forum.

The festival is co-organized with ARCS Arizona and ARCS Detroit. It keeps its partnership with the Romanian Film Fest Arizona, whose in-person screenings take place Nov. 19–20 at Majestic Tempe 7 in Tempe, AZ. Poster art for 2022 is by Daniel Ursache.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Duwamish Longhouse

In place of the Duwamish Annual Gala we are hosting an Online Native Art Auction. Bidding begins November 10th and concluded November 30th at 9pm.

View Event
Duwamish Longhouse
Seattle, WA

Our annual Native Art Market will feature native art vendors and food. Please note: Parking will be very limited.

View Event
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI)
Seattle, WA
Free with admission!
The film chronicles the Jimi Hendrix Experience’s storied visit to Maui, and how the band became ensnared with the ill-fated Rainbow Bridge movie and incorporates never-before-released original footage and new interviews.
This event is part of The Jimi Hendrix 80th Birthday Experience. Learn more ➞ bit.ly/3WpNADd
View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are really excited to host our amazingly talented and hilarious friend Lalo Alcaraz at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery in November.

View Event
Northwest Danish Association
Seattle, WA

Juleauktion 2022 is the Northwest Danish Association (NWDA) annual fundraising event. This virtual auction offers unique gifts from Denmark, gift certificates to local businesses, vacation stays, art and much more. Browse and bid online!

The auction will help fund community programs by NWDA, including scholarships and eldercare.

The auction will run from November 13th to November 28th. Items may be picked up after December 5th.

All items must be picked up at Northwest Danish Association (1833 N. 105th Street, #101, Seattle, WA 98133). Exceptions may be made for gift certificates and some small items, which can be mailed for a small fee.

View Event
Vashon Center for the Arts
Vashon, WA
The gallery presents an art exhibition “Indigenous Art of the Salish Sea”,  a group show of Native American artists from or working in the Salish sea region; paintings, prints, and glasswork, including work by Dan Friday Kwul Kwul Tw. Most people are familiar with formline art of the Alaskan coastal artists. The Salish Sea artists of our region have their own unique style. Collaborating with Stonington Gallery (Seattle) and local native artists, the exhibition introduces the viewer to the wide variety art styles, both traditional and contemporary, created by Salish Sea artists.
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Refuge Outdoor Festival
Issaquah, WA

The Refuge Day series is geared towards BIPOC and features seasonal outdoor-focused activities, skills sharing, outdoor recreation workshops

#OptOutside with Golden Bricks Events this Black Friday! Let’s meet up, explore and learn more about the land, and be in community with each other.

November’s Refuge Day will explore public lands and how they inspire, influence, and create connections with an array of diverse folks. Take a hike with us, meditate with us, and learn more about BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) experiences on public lands.

We will be collaborating with The Wilderness Society and The Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Land Movement at November’s Refuge Day where they will facilitate an interpretive hike and a group talk.

Learn about the Snoqualmie Ancestral Land Movement during an educational walk through the park. The walk will begin at Sunset Beach and end at Tibbets Beach.

The Snoqualmie Tribe’s Ancestral Lands Movement seeks to spread awareness of the Snoqualmie people who have lived in the southern Salish Sea region since time immemorial. The walk will share the significance of these lands and will provide information on how people can help the Tribe in respecting, restoring, and protecting these lands.

As the Salish Sea region has grown in population, the Snoqualmie Tribe’s ancestral lands have been heavily impacted by recreation. This impact is especially apparent at the popular trails in the Snoqualmie corridor area, where increased visitation has resulted in a degradation of the land.

Join The Wilderness Society for a group talk about the newest edition of their curriculum, which will include:

– More stories of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color in the conservation movement

– Updated lessons and background reading on managing issues on public lands

– A new module: Climate Change, Biodiversity, and Public Lands — plus two new lesson plans and teaching materials which feature collaborations with educator and curriculum author Bill Bigelow and three amazing climate activism artists

In rolling out the latest edition of their curriculum, they’ve partnered with Intersectional Environmentalist to create a series of short animations highlighting stories from the curriculum.

The purpose of this event is to spread awareness about BIPOC solidarity, stewardship, and advocacy and to facilitate an inclusive environment.

SCHEDULE

Welcome & Grounding Session | 1-1:15p

Group Activity with The Wilderness Society | 1:20-1:45p

Educational Hike with Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement | 2-2:50p

Survey + Closing Session | 2:50-3p

All are welcome to attend this FREE community event. Bring your friends and family to the park to learn about all you can do to protect our shared wild spaces.

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Charlene Teters
Spokane, WA

Opening Reception: November 4, 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Gallery Talk at 4:30 p.m.
Gonzaga University Urban Art Center (GUUAC) located downtown at 125 S. Stevens Street, 3rd Floor

Panel discussion with “Land Acknowledgement” artists Charlene Teters (Spokane), Tiffanie Irizarry (Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe), and Joeseph Arnoux (Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ)
November 8th at 3:00 p.m.
Hemmingson Ballroom

Exhibit on display November 4 – December 3. Gallery hours at the GUUAC are Fridays 4:00-7:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

View Event
American Romanian Cultural Society - ARCS Project
Seattle, WA

HomeLands, the 2022 edition of the RFF, is a genre-spanning selection of internationally acclaimed movies that, complemented by special guest events and film talks, reflect on themes and events of the past year. The carefully curated program celebrates the power of film to map out new meaning in a world where people have been displaced by wars, economic crises, political instability, and natural disasters. Audiences are asked to redefine their sense of belonging—of homelands—in relation to family, neighbors, home countries, and to the planet itself.

After two successful virtual editions in 2020 and 2021, the festival continues this year in a hybrid format, with virtual programs available nationwide on the web, and with in-person screenings from Nov. 11–13 and Nov. 18–20 at Northwest Film Forum.

The festival is co-organized with ARCS Arizona and ARCS Detroit. It keeps its partnership with the Romanian Film Fest Arizona, whose in-person screenings take place Nov. 19–20 at Majestic Tempe 7 in Tempe, AZ. Poster art for 2022 is by Daniel Ursache.

View Event
Silverton Christmas Market
Silverton, OR

The annual event, Silverton Christmas Market, offers a joyous and magical holiday experience for all ages. Stroll along immersive paths draped in more than one million lights. Explore our authentic German Christmas Market for gifts from artisan vendors and imported German nutcrackers, smokers and ornaments. Visit Santa to share your wish list or enjoy music and a brew in the Biergarten, presented by Western Beverage. Cozy up to a wood-burning fire pit or take a ride down the snowless tubing hill. There will be no ice skating this year.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event
Celebrate the legacy of a groundbreaking Seattle musician. Learn more ➞ https://bit.ly/3WpNADd
MOHAI celebrates the 80th birthday of Seattle rock legend Jimi Hendrix with a spectacular weekend-long event. An array of exciting activities is planned, highlighting the artist’s life and career, including a screening of the documentary “Live in Maui”, a special Q & A with his sister Janie Hendrix, and rare display of some of the performer’s most iconic stage outfits. The MOHAI Mercantile will also host a pop-up shop of Hendrix themed gifts and souvenirs. The interactive celebration promises fans and friends 3 days of Hendrix music and more.
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Ages 21 and over. Join us for this special Indigenous Heritage Day celebration featuring indigenous performing ensembles Black Belt Eagle Scout & Khu.eex.

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Event
Organization
Location
Duwamish Longhouse

In place of the Duwamish Annual Gala we are hosting an Online Native Art Auction. Bidding begins November 10th and concluded November 30th at 9pm.

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Duwamish Longhouse
Seattle, WA

Our annual Native Art Market will feature native art vendors and food. Please note: Parking will be very limited.

View Event
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI)
Seattle, WA
Free with admission!
The film chronicles the Jimi Hendrix Experience’s storied visit to Maui, and how the band became ensnared with the ill-fated Rainbow Bridge movie and incorporates never-before-released original footage and new interviews.
This event is part of The Jimi Hendrix 80th Birthday Experience. Learn more ➞ bit.ly/3WpNADd
View Event
New Sweden Cultural Heritage Society
Portland, OR

New Sweden is proud to host the 1st Annual Scandinavian Christmas Goat Market, on Saturday, November 26, at the historic Norse Hall in Portland, Oregon. This event will include 20+ vendors selling an array of Nordic related goods in a lovely high ceiling ballroom decorated with flags from all of the Nordic countries. In the basement, we’ll have five Nordic food and baked good vendors, so participants can purchase all of their favorite foods and treats. Guest will continue to get into the holiday spirit (julstämning) as they wander through the kids area making free Dala and Jul goat crafts or when they stop to listen to live music. Come celebrate a Scandinavian Christmas with us!

Tickets sold at the door.

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are really excited to host our amazingly talented and hilarious friend Lalo Alcaraz at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery in November.

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Northwest Danish Association
Seattle, WA

Juleauktion 2022 is the Northwest Danish Association (NWDA) annual fundraising event. This virtual auction offers unique gifts from Denmark, gift certificates to local businesses, vacation stays, art and much more. Browse and bid online!

The auction will help fund community programs by NWDA, including scholarships and eldercare.

The auction will run from November 13th to November 28th. Items may be picked up after December 5th.

All items must be picked up at Northwest Danish Association (1833 N. 105th Street, #101, Seattle, WA 98133). Exceptions may be made for gift certificates and some small items, which can be mailed for a small fee.

View Event
Vashon Center for the Arts
Vashon, WA
The gallery presents an art exhibition “Indigenous Art of the Salish Sea”,  a group show of Native American artists from or working in the Salish sea region; paintings, prints, and glasswork, including work by Dan Friday Kwul Kwul Tw. Most people are familiar with formline art of the Alaskan coastal artists. The Salish Sea artists of our region have their own unique style. Collaborating with Stonington Gallery (Seattle) and local native artists, the exhibition introduces the viewer to the wide variety art styles, both traditional and contemporary, created by Salish Sea artists.
View Event
Charlene Teters
Spokane, WA

Opening Reception: November 4, 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Gallery Talk at 4:30 p.m.
Gonzaga University Urban Art Center (GUUAC) located downtown at 125 S. Stevens Street, 3rd Floor

Panel discussion with “Land Acknowledgement” artists Charlene Teters (Spokane), Tiffanie Irizarry (Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe), and Joeseph Arnoux (Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ)
November 8th at 3:00 p.m.
Hemmingson Ballroom

Exhibit on display November 4 – December 3. Gallery hours at the GUUAC are Fridays 4:00-7:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

View Event
American Romanian Cultural Society - ARCS Project
Seattle, WA

HomeLands, the 2022 edition of the RFF, is a genre-spanning selection of internationally acclaimed movies that, complemented by special guest events and film talks, reflect on themes and events of the past year. The carefully curated program celebrates the power of film to map out new meaning in a world where people have been displaced by wars, economic crises, political instability, and natural disasters. Audiences are asked to redefine their sense of belonging—of homelands—in relation to family, neighbors, home countries, and to the planet itself.

After two successful virtual editions in 2020 and 2021, the festival continues this year in a hybrid format, with virtual programs available nationwide on the web, and with in-person screenings from Nov. 11–13 and Nov. 18–20 at Northwest Film Forum.

The festival is co-organized with ARCS Arizona and ARCS Detroit. It keeps its partnership with the Romanian Film Fest Arizona, whose in-person screenings take place Nov. 19–20 at Majestic Tempe 7 in Tempe, AZ. Poster art for 2022 is by Daniel Ursache.

View Event
Silverton Christmas Market
Silverton, OR

The annual event, Silverton Christmas Market, offers a joyous and magical holiday experience for all ages. Stroll along immersive paths draped in more than one million lights. Explore our authentic German Christmas Market for gifts from artisan vendors and imported German nutcrackers, smokers and ornaments. Visit Santa to share your wish list or enjoy music and a brew in the Biergarten, presented by Western Beverage. Cozy up to a wood-burning fire pit or take a ride down the snowless tubing hill. There will be no ice skating this year.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event
Celebrate the legacy of a groundbreaking Seattle musician. Learn more ➞ https://bit.ly/3WpNADd
MOHAI celebrates the 80th birthday of Seattle rock legend Jimi Hendrix with a spectacular weekend-long event. An array of exciting activities is planned, highlighting the artist’s life and career, including a screening of the documentary “Live in Maui”, a special Q & A with his sister Janie Hendrix, and rare display of some of the performer’s most iconic stage outfits. The MOHAI Mercantile will also host a pop-up shop of Hendrix themed gifts and souvenirs. The interactive celebration promises fans and friends 3 days of Hendrix music and more.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Duwamish Longhouse

In place of the Duwamish Annual Gala we are hosting an Online Native Art Auction. Bidding begins November 10th and concluded November 30th at 9pm.

View Event
Duwamish Longhouse
Seattle, WA

Our annual Native Art Market will feature native art vendors and food. Please note: Parking will be very limited.

View Event
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI)
Seattle, WA
Free with admission!
The film chronicles the Jimi Hendrix Experience’s storied visit to Maui, and how the band became ensnared with the ill-fated Rainbow Bridge movie and incorporates never-before-released original footage and new interviews.
This event is part of The Jimi Hendrix 80th Birthday Experience. Learn more ➞ bit.ly/3WpNADd
View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are really excited to host our amazingly talented and hilarious friend Lalo Alcaraz at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery in November.

View Event
Northwest Danish Association
Seattle, WA

Juleauktion 2022 is the Northwest Danish Association (NWDA) annual fundraising event. This virtual auction offers unique gifts from Denmark, gift certificates to local businesses, vacation stays, art and much more. Browse and bid online!

The auction will help fund community programs by NWDA, including scholarships and eldercare.

The auction will run from November 13th to November 28th. Items may be picked up after December 5th.

All items must be picked up at Northwest Danish Association (1833 N. 105th Street, #101, Seattle, WA 98133). Exceptions may be made for gift certificates and some small items, which can be mailed for a small fee.

View Event
Vashon Center for the Arts
Vashon, WA
The gallery presents an art exhibition “Indigenous Art of the Salish Sea”,  a group show of Native American artists from or working in the Salish sea region; paintings, prints, and glasswork, including work by Dan Friday Kwul Kwul Tw. Most people are familiar with formline art of the Alaskan coastal artists. The Salish Sea artists of our region have their own unique style. Collaborating with Stonington Gallery (Seattle) and local native artists, the exhibition introduces the viewer to the wide variety art styles, both traditional and contemporary, created by Salish Sea artists.
View Event
Charlene Teters
Spokane, WA

Opening Reception: November 4, 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Gallery Talk at 4:30 p.m.
Gonzaga University Urban Art Center (GUUAC) located downtown at 125 S. Stevens Street, 3rd Floor

Panel discussion with “Land Acknowledgement” artists Charlene Teters (Spokane), Tiffanie Irizarry (Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe), and Joeseph Arnoux (Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ)
November 8th at 3:00 p.m.
Hemmingson Ballroom

Exhibit on display November 4 – December 3. Gallery hours at the GUUAC are Fridays 4:00-7:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

View Event
American Romanian Cultural Society - ARCS Project
Seattle, WA

HomeLands, the 2022 edition of the RFF, is a genre-spanning selection of internationally acclaimed movies that, complemented by special guest events and film talks, reflect on themes and events of the past year. The carefully curated program celebrates the power of film to map out new meaning in a world where people have been displaced by wars, economic crises, political instability, and natural disasters. Audiences are asked to redefine their sense of belonging—of homelands—in relation to family, neighbors, home countries, and to the planet itself.

After two successful virtual editions in 2020 and 2021, the festival continues this year in a hybrid format, with virtual programs available nationwide on the web, and with in-person screenings from Nov. 11–13 and Nov. 18–20 at Northwest Film Forum.

The festival is co-organized with ARCS Arizona and ARCS Detroit. It keeps its partnership with the Romanian Film Fest Arizona, whose in-person screenings take place Nov. 19–20 at Majestic Tempe 7 in Tempe, AZ. Poster art for 2022 is by Daniel Ursache.

View Event
Silverton Christmas Market
Silverton, OR

The annual event, Silverton Christmas Market, offers a joyous and magical holiday experience for all ages. Stroll along immersive paths draped in more than one million lights. Explore our authentic German Christmas Market for gifts from artisan vendors and imported German nutcrackers, smokers and ornaments. Visit Santa to share your wish list or enjoy music and a brew in the Biergarten, presented by Western Beverage. Cozy up to a wood-burning fire pit or take a ride down the snowless tubing hill. There will be no ice skating this year.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event
Celebrate the legacy of a groundbreaking Seattle musician. Learn more ➞ https://bit.ly/3WpNADd
MOHAI celebrates the 80th birthday of Seattle rock legend Jimi Hendrix with a spectacular weekend-long event. An array of exciting activities is planned, highlighting the artist’s life and career, including a screening of the documentary “Live in Maui”, a special Q & A with his sister Janie Hendrix, and rare display of some of the performer’s most iconic stage outfits. The MOHAI Mercantile will also host a pop-up shop of Hendrix themed gifts and souvenirs. The interactive celebration promises fans and friends 3 days of Hendrix music and more.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Duwamish Longhouse

In place of the Duwamish Annual Gala we are hosting an Online Native Art Auction. Bidding begins November 10th and concluded November 30th at 9pm.

View Event
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Northwest Danish Association
Seattle, WA

Juleauktion 2022 is the Northwest Danish Association (NWDA) annual fundraising event. This virtual auction offers unique gifts from Denmark, gift certificates to local businesses, vacation stays, art and much more. Browse and bid online!

The auction will help fund community programs by NWDA, including scholarships and eldercare.

The auction will run from November 13th to November 28th. Items may be picked up after December 5th.

All items must be picked up at Northwest Danish Association (1833 N. 105th Street, #101, Seattle, WA 98133). Exceptions may be made for gift certificates and some small items, which can be mailed for a small fee.

View Event
Charlene Teters
Spokane, WA

Opening Reception: November 4, 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Gallery Talk at 4:30 p.m.
Gonzaga University Urban Art Center (GUUAC) located downtown at 125 S. Stevens Street, 3rd Floor

Panel discussion with “Land Acknowledgement” artists Charlene Teters (Spokane), Tiffanie Irizarry (Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe), and Joeseph Arnoux (Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ)
November 8th at 3:00 p.m.
Hemmingson Ballroom

Exhibit on display November 4 – December 3. Gallery hours at the GUUAC are Fridays 4:00-7:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

View Event
Silverton Christmas Market
Silverton, OR

The annual event, Silverton Christmas Market, offers a joyous and magical holiday experience for all ages. Stroll along immersive paths draped in more than one million lights. Explore our authentic German Christmas Market for gifts from artisan vendors and imported German nutcrackers, smokers and ornaments. Visit Santa to share your wish list or enjoy music and a brew in the Biergarten, presented by Western Beverage. Cozy up to a wood-burning fire pit or take a ride down the snowless tubing hill. There will be no ice skating this year.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event

About the Book
In prose that is evocative and sensual, unabashedly queer and visceral, raw and autobiographical, Whitehead writes of an Indigenous body in pain, coping with trauma. Deeply rooted within, he reaches across the anguish to create a new form of storytelling he calls “biostory”—beyond genre, and entirely sovereign. Through this narrative perspective, Making Love with the Land recasts mental health struggles and our complex emotional landscapes from a nefarious parasite on his (and our) well-being to kin, even a relation, no matter what difficulties they present to us. Whitehead ruminates on loss and pain without shame or ridicule but rather highlights waypoints for personal transformation. Written in the aftermath of heartbreak, before and during the pandemic, Making Love with the Land illuminates this present moment in which both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people are rediscovering old ways and creating new ones about connection with and responsibility toward each other and the land.

About the Authors
Joshua Whitehead is an Oji-nêhiyaw, Two-Spirit member of Peguis First Nation (Treaty 1), and the author of the award-winning novel Jonny Appleseed. That book established Whitehead as one of the most exciting and important new literary voices on Turtle Island, winning both a Lambda Literary Award and Canada Reads 2021. In Making Love with the Land, his first nonfiction book, Whitehead explores the relationships between body, language, and land through creative essay, memoir, and confession.

Tommy Pico is a poet, podcaster, tv writer, and shower singer. Originally from the Viejas Indian reservation of the Kumeyaay nation, he currently resides in Los Angeles after a 15 year stint in Brooklyn.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Duwamish Longhouse

In place of the Duwamish Annual Gala we are hosting an Online Native Art Auction. Bidding begins November 10th and concluded November 30th at 9pm.

View Event
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Charlene Teters
Spokane, WA

Opening Reception: November 4, 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Gallery Talk at 4:30 p.m.
Gonzaga University Urban Art Center (GUUAC) located downtown at 125 S. Stevens Street, 3rd Floor

Panel discussion with “Land Acknowledgement” artists Charlene Teters (Spokane), Tiffanie Irizarry (Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe), and Joeseph Arnoux (Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ)
November 8th at 3:00 p.m.
Hemmingson Ballroom

Exhibit on display November 4 – December 3. Gallery hours at the GUUAC are Fridays 4:00-7:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

View Event
White Center Community Development Association
Seattle, WA

Free Dinner Provided For Everyone! Thank you to Evergreen, Healthier Here, and the Na’ah Illahee Fund for this event series!

View Event
Silverton Christmas Market
Silverton, OR

The annual event, Silverton Christmas Market, offers a joyous and magical holiday experience for all ages. Stroll along immersive paths draped in more than one million lights. Explore our authentic German Christmas Market for gifts from artisan vendors and imported German nutcrackers, smokers and ornaments. Visit Santa to share your wish list or enjoy music and a brew in the Biergarten, presented by Western Beverage. Cozy up to a wood-burning fire pit or take a ride down the snowless tubing hill. There will be no ice skating this year.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Duwamish Longhouse

In place of the Duwamish Annual Gala we are hosting an Online Native Art Auction. Bidding begins November 10th and concluded November 30th at 9pm.

View Event
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Indigenize Productions
Seattle, WA

New Mexico may have the Sant Fe Indian Market, but Indigenize Productions has the Seattle Gay NDN Market! On Nov 30th, the end of Native Heritage Month, and Just in time for the Holidays, we are bringing together a bunch of lovely Indigenous vendors for you to check out at Cafe Racer, 12pm-6pm! All ages!

View Event
Charlene Teters
Spokane, WA

Opening Reception: November 4, 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Gallery Talk at 4:30 p.m.
Gonzaga University Urban Art Center (GUUAC) located downtown at 125 S. Stevens Street, 3rd Floor

Panel discussion with “Land Acknowledgement” artists Charlene Teters (Spokane), Tiffanie Irizarry (Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe), and Joeseph Arnoux (Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ)
November 8th at 3:00 p.m.
Hemmingson Ballroom

Exhibit on display November 4 – December 3. Gallery hours at the GUUAC are Fridays 4:00-7:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

View Event
Silverton Christmas Market
Silverton, OR

The annual event, Silverton Christmas Market, offers a joyous and magical holiday experience for all ages. Stroll along immersive paths draped in more than one million lights. Explore our authentic German Christmas Market for gifts from artisan vendors and imported German nutcrackers, smokers and ornaments. Visit Santa to share your wish list or enjoy music and a brew in the Biergarten, presented by Western Beverage. Cozy up to a wood-burning fire pit or take a ride down the snowless tubing hill. There will be no ice skating this year.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
PassinArt Theatre Company
Portland, OR

PassinArt: A Theatre Company presents Black Nativity by poet and playwright Langston Hughes. Based on the traditional Nativity story, the spirit-filled, inspiring gospel song play features traditional Christmas carols performed in a gospel style with a few new songs specifically for the show.

View Event
Charlene Teters
Spokane, WA

Opening Reception: November 4, 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Gallery Talk at 4:30 p.m.
Gonzaga University Urban Art Center (GUUAC) located downtown at 125 S. Stevens Street, 3rd Floor

Panel discussion with “Land Acknowledgement” artists Charlene Teters (Spokane), Tiffanie Irizarry (Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe), and Joeseph Arnoux (Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ)
November 8th at 3:00 p.m.
Hemmingson Ballroom

Exhibit on display November 4 – December 3. Gallery hours at the GUUAC are Fridays 4:00-7:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

View Event
Silverton Christmas Market
Silverton, OR

The annual event, Silverton Christmas Market, offers a joyous and magical holiday experience for all ages. Stroll along immersive paths draped in more than one million lights. Explore our authentic German Christmas Market for gifts from artisan vendors and imported German nutcrackers, smokers and ornaments. Visit Santa to share your wish list or enjoy music and a brew in the Biergarten, presented by Western Beverage. Cozy up to a wood-burning fire pit or take a ride down the snowless tubing hill. There will be no ice skating this year.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event

We are excited to welcome to the store Joanna Ho, author of picture books Eyes That Kiss in the Corners and Eyes That Speak to the Stars and young adult novel The Silence that Binds Us!

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The event will include showings of The Woman King a film about strong, black female warriors which was chosen to honor the legacy of a strong, black female warrior for the Black community in Spokane — Sandy Williams. The event will also include an accompanying silent auction with a plethora of wonderful items which will be available for viewing prior to the December 1st auction on the Carl Maxey Center Facebook page. Proceeds of the event will go to benefit the Carl Maxey Center of Spokane.

ADDITIONAL SHOWS OF THE WOMAN KING WILL SCREEN DEC. 2-8 WITH PROCEEDS GOING TO THE CARL MAXEY CENTER.

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Event
Organization
Location
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

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Charlene Teters
Spokane, WA

Opening Reception: November 4, 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Gallery Talk at 4:30 p.m.
Gonzaga University Urban Art Center (GUUAC) located downtown at 125 S. Stevens Street, 3rd Floor

Panel discussion with “Land Acknowledgement” artists Charlene Teters (Spokane), Tiffanie Irizarry (Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe), and Joeseph Arnoux (Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ)
November 8th at 3:00 p.m.
Hemmingson Ballroom

Exhibit on display November 4 – December 3. Gallery hours at the GUUAC are Fridays 4:00-7:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

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Surel's Place
Boise, ID

A celebration of the arts in the Surel Mitchell Live-Work-Create District
In addition to all of our artists and studios, we are working with a group of digital projection artists to light up the buildings of our district!

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Anchorage International Film Festival
Anchorage, AK

The 22nd Annual Anchorage International Film Festival will take place December 2-11, 2022. We are currently planning an in-person event, with all films available to watch at our various venues. Follow us on Facebook for updates throughout the year. And thanks again to all the filmmakers and audience members who helped make AIFF 2021 a wonderful success!

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Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

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Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

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Temple B'nai Torah
Bellevue, WA

Join us for a very special night of music and prayer at TBT. Nefesh Mountain is one of the hottest Jewish bands in the world. They were recently featured in Rolling Stone Magazine, which said, “A masterclass in string music, Nefesh Mountain preach peace, understanding, and acceptance with musical muscle.” The concert will be preceded by a dinner with food from Ezell’s Famous Chicken (and vegetarian options), so bring your appetite and get ready for an evening of music and celebration.

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Event
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Location

In celebration of the Association on American Indian Affairs’ 100th anniversary (1922-2022), the Association is honored to announce the first annual Tribal Museums Day to be held on Saturday, December 3, 2022. We are engaging Tribal Museums and Cultural Centers across Indian Country to share our collective wisdom, values and diverse cultures!
The Association’s vision is to create a world where diverse Native cultures and values are lived, protected and respected. Tribal Museums Day will bring attention to our diverse Nations and cultures, stimulate tourism, and grow Tribal economies. Tribal Museums Day will also support the vision and mission of each Tribal Museum by re-educating the public that our Nations are the primary experts of Indigenous histories, knowledge, cultures, lifeways and values.
Check out a Tribal Museum or Cultural Center near you and you may enjoy:

FREE Admission
Special Exhibits
Gift Shop Discounts (consider holiday gift giving!)
Art Markets
Live Cultural Demonstrations

Live Event
As part of our 100-year anniversary, the Association will also host a live streaming event on Saturday, December 3, 2022 on social media from multiple Tribal Museums to celebrate Tribal Museums Day. The live streaming event will be emceed by Shannon Martin, Match-E-Be-Nash-She-Wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians, an include other interesting wisdom keepers from Indian Country.

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Tulalip Youth Council
Tulalip Bay, WA

Join UNITY for this free training for Native youth ages 14-24. Sign Up today to attend the two day training on December 3-4, 2022 hosted by the Tulalip Tribes of Washington at the Don Hatch Youth Center, WA.

Registration is open to the first 50 Native youth who register! There is no fee to participate.

In addition to UNITY hands-on learning during the day, the Tulalip Youth Council invite youth to attend the Coastal Jam on Saturday Night (Open to the community)

Food will be provided by the host Youth Council Saturday Breakfast-Sunday lunch.
Discounted Rooms are available for lodging at Tulalip Casino resort, for more information on the hotel email Jessica Bustad at jbustad@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov

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Heartful Rootz
Shoreline, WA
All are welcome, we invite our community to come and enjoy handmade art by your local Black, Indigenous & People of the global majority artists. One-of-a-kind items will be available, some folks may even offer custom and classes.
Sky Nursery is a gorgeous and uplifting place that brings us all together. They have an array of indoor and outdoor plants and garden items to enjoy.
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Unique Markets
Portland, OR

We’ve curated the best-of-the-best for you! Our diverse collection of 160 designers, emerging brands & artists has something for all – jewelry, housewares, gourmet artisanal gifts, art, fashion, leather goods and so much more!

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Corvallis Multicultural Literacy Center
Corvallis, OR

We’re excited to invite you to the CMLC Winter Bazaar 2022, our closing event of the year! Come find international decor and textiles, jewelry, vintage items, and many more. Get your end-of-the-year shopping done with us, discover unique international pieces, and support a good cause!

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Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
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Communities of Color Coalition

Organizational and self-identified community leaders of color across Washington are cordially invited to join us virtually on Saturday, December 3rd, 10:00 AM -1:00 PM, to represent their organizations or communities and identify shared legislative priorities.

In the spirit of strengthening communities furthest from justice and in alignment with the goals of the Members of Color Caucus’ (Senate, House, LBC), the POCLS is transitioning its leadership to a more BIPOC collective led process. This is in alignment with national movements on centering this work within racial equity and systemic changes with the urgency that solutions (and those who can make change happen) exist already within BIPOC communities and its respective multigenerational leadership. Our new leadership comes from previous Summit participants, alongside community leaders/organizations already doing this work within WA State. We are excited about the transition and welcome those interested to be involved or provide feedback to ensure that this event/process is continually centering voices left out of critical decision making.

One of our core priorities (and lessons learned in previous years) is that we, as a BIPOC community led process, want to establish evaluation and accountability measures to ensure our issues are prioritized and tracked by our elected officials. We are growing our volunteer bill tracking team and welcome participants of the summit to help champion issues at the legislature to ensure our collective priorities are not left behind.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
German American Society of Portland
Portland, OR

The German American Society of Portland presents Weihnachtsmarkt 2022: A German Christmas Market! This year’s market will be held on December 3 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Deutsches Haus on NE 57th and Sandy in Portland. The Weihnachtsmarkt will feature Glühwein (German mulled wine), German food, vendors selling Christmas gifts, baby goats, festive live music, and a real St. Nikolaus!

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Native American Youth and Family Center
Portland, OR

Looking for some Native bling for the holidays? Visit our Winter Native Made Winter Marketplace each weekend through the month of December at the future site of our retail shop, right in the heart of Cully! Support Native artists and find the perfect gift for everyone in your life! There will be live music, refreshment

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Seattle Turkish Film Festival (STFF)
Seattle, WA

We are happy to announce the 10th Seattle Turkish Film Festival Program that features some of the best contemporary Turkish Films. STFF 2022 will take place between December 3-4 at SIFF Uptown. All screenings of this year will be in-person, and we will be following the CDC guidelines for public health to keep everyone safe for future screenings.

Please support us by joining these screenings and events as we are all looking forward to reconnecting in-person with our wonderful community.

Consider donating to support local film industry, and follow us for discount tickets and more!

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Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

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“Winter was the Elder’s time” says Darren Parry. A time for stories & wisdom, passed down from one generation to another. In our inaugural series “Curious Conversations”, we are pleased to welcome one such Elder as he shares a Winter story of Shoshone culture, tragedy, and hope. Weather dependent we will be having a poolside conversation in our gathering pool or a fireside chat in our Forest Yurt for what promises to be a healing, curious, conversation.

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Center for Indigenous Midwifery
King County, WA

Faciliatated by partera Tema Mercado, CPM, LM
Spinning Babies® begins with fetal rotation to reveal the lesser known physiology of birth anatomy. Your passion, our approach. Start seeing solutions in labor progress with this new lens on childbirth. After this workshop you will be able to:
Facilitate comfort in pregnancy and ease in childbirth for your clients
Improve fetal position without manipulation of the fetus
Identify issues faster; gentle actions to shorten a long labor or avoid a cesarean
Use less (or no) force to resolve malposition and labor dystocia
And much, much more!
Spinning Babies® Three PrinciplesSM. Three BalancesSM, and Three Levels Solutions offers the world’s first complete system of birth preparation and labor ease concepts using baby’s position. Physiological techniques change the effective size of the pelvis through the body’s own innate capacity to resolve or prevent labor dystocia. Registration required.

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Muslimahs Against Abuse Center (MAAC)
Des Moines, WA

On behalf of Muslimahs Against Abuse Center (MAAC), we want to inform everyone that our annual Muslimahs Networking Night which was scheduled to happen on November 20th, 2022 has now been moved to December 3rd, 2022 with a venue change as well due to unavoidable circumstances. The new venue will be at Highline College Campus at 2400 S 240th St, Des Moines, WA 98198 from 3:00 pm to 8:00 pm on the new date.

If you have already purchased tickets and would still like to join us for this wonderful evening please note the changes and we will see you soon!

We are so excited to see you all very soon! Limited number of tickets available purchase your before we sell out. Tickets will not be sold at the door this year!

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Charlene Teters
Spokane, WA

Opening Reception: November 4, 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Gallery Talk at 4:30 p.m.
Gonzaga University Urban Art Center (GUUAC) located downtown at 125 S. Stevens Street, 3rd Floor

Panel discussion with “Land Acknowledgement” artists Charlene Teters (Spokane), Tiffanie Irizarry (Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe), and Joeseph Arnoux (Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ)
November 8th at 3:00 p.m.
Hemmingson Ballroom

Exhibit on display November 4 – December 3. Gallery hours at the GUUAC are Fridays 4:00-7:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

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VietQ Seattle
Seattle, WA

Come and party with other QT Viet folks. Food, karaoke, and dance. Optional white elephant if you wish to participate bring a gift.

Parking Instructions: Free Street parking available.

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Tacoma Urban League
Tacoma, WA
Bring the whole family and join Tacoma Urban League for our 9th Annual Holiday Luau hosted by Asia Pacific Cultural Center.
Enjoy a delicious menu and entertainment representing the South Pacific Islands of Tonga, Fiji, Tahiti, Hawaii, New Zealand, and Samoa.
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Sankofa Film Society & Theatre
Seattle, WA

Celebration of 10 years of the Miss & Mr Community Pageantry 2022-23 (21+ event)

If your interested in running for either titles. ( Miss, Ms or Mr, Mx)

Pageant Night Categories are
* Daytime Realness
* Talent
* Formal Wear / Evening Gown
* Q&A

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Grupo Folklorico Herencias Mexicanas
Everett, WA

Over two years in the making, let Grupo Folklorico Herencias Mexicanas transport you from the PNW to Mexico as we celebrate the customs and traditions of some of Mexico’s most recognized festivals. Join us for a night of amazing folklorico dances and vendors.

Featuring: Folklor Oaxaqueño

Doors Open: 6:00 PM

Show Begins: 7:00 PM

Vendor List:

  • Tierra del Sol Creations
  • Sin Nombre Designs
  • Y & A Natural Design
  • El Tesoro Jewels

Children 5 and under are free and do not require a ticket, but they must sit on the lap of a ticketed adult.

Masks are not required but encouraged.

Don’t forget to enter your dancer code at checkout to to help each dancer reach their ticket sales goal.

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Event
Organization
Location
Tulalip Youth Council
Tulalip Bay, WA

Join UNITY for this free training for Native youth ages 14-24. Sign Up today to attend the two day training on December 3-4, 2022 hosted by the Tulalip Tribes of Washington at the Don Hatch Youth Center, WA.

Registration is open to the first 50 Native youth who register! There is no fee to participate.

In addition to UNITY hands-on learning during the day, the Tulalip Youth Council invite youth to attend the Coastal Jam on Saturday Night (Open to the community)

Food will be provided by the host Youth Council Saturday Breakfast-Sunday lunch.
Discounted Rooms are available for lodging at Tulalip Casino resort, for more information on the hotel email Jessica Bustad at jbustad@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov

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Heartful Rootz
Shoreline, WA
All are welcome, we invite our community to come and enjoy handmade art by your local Black, Indigenous & People of the global majority artists. One-of-a-kind items will be available, some folks may even offer custom and classes.
Sky Nursery is a gorgeous and uplifting place that brings us all together. They have an array of indoor and outdoor plants and garden items to enjoy.
View Event
Unique Markets
Portland, OR

We’ve curated the best-of-the-best for you! Our diverse collection of 160 designers, emerging brands & artists has something for all – jewelry, housewares, gourmet artisanal gifts, art, fashion, leather goods and so much more!

View Event
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Basque Museum and Cultural Center
Boise, ID

Please join us on the Basque Block on Sunday, December 4 from 11am-4pm, for our first annual Eguberriko Azoka, or Basque Christmas Market. There will be food and drink, vendors from near and far, and activities for the kids. This event is a collaboration between the Basque Museum and Euzkaldunak in conjunction with Boiseko Gazteak’s Winter Performance.

The Azoka will take place before, during, and after Boiseko Gazteak’s performance. There will be a Christmas photo booth starting at 2:30 where kids will have a chance to get photographed with Olentzero on a sheep wagon.

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Native American Youth and Family Center
Portland, OR

Looking for some Native bling for the holidays? Visit our Winter Native Made Winter Marketplace each weekend through the month of December at the future site of our retail shop, right in the heart of Cully! Support Native artists and find the perfect gift for everyone in your life! There will be live music, refreshment

View Event
Cowlitz Tribe
Toledo, WA

Come join staff from the Cowlitz Tribe Natural Resources Department and Cowlitz Garden to plant camas bulbs for a second year as part of the Gospodor property restoration project.
We will be planting common camas (Camassia quamash) bulbs and learning about camas.
Lunch, snacks, and warm drinks will be provided in collaboration with the Senior Nutrition Program.
All ages are welcome!
Due to limited parking on-site, we will have transit vehicles making trips back and forth between the site and the Park & Ride located nearby starting around 11:00AM.

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Seattle Turkish Film Festival (STFF)
Seattle, WA

We are happy to announce the 10th Seattle Turkish Film Festival Program that features some of the best contemporary Turkish Films. STFF 2022 will take place between December 3-4 at SIFF Uptown. All screenings of this year will be in-person, and we will be following the CDC guidelines for public health to keep everyone safe for future screenings.

Please support us by joining these screenings and events as we are all looking forward to reconnecting in-person with our wonderful community.

Consider donating to support local film industry, and follow us for discount tickets and more!

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Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

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Stroum Jewish Community Center
Mercer Island, WA

This Hanukkah, sing and dance along with a cappella and Jewish music sensations the Maccabeats! Originally formed as a Yeshiva University student vocal group, the Maccabeats are phenomenal performers with a massive fan base, over 20 million views on YouTube, numerous TV appearances, and four successful albums, including their bestselling “A Maccabeats Hanukkah.” With little more than their unadulterated voices, a little Jewish humor, and a philosophy of integrating traditional and secular sounds, they entertain and inspire audiences of all backgrounds and ages with an eclectic repertoire of Jewish and Israeli songs, pop hits, and signature mash-ups, like breakout Hanukkah parody, “Candlelight.” Their all-ages Hanukkah shows will have the whole family rocking out! Best for ages 4+

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Portland Japanese Garden
Portland, OR

Enjoy a free koto harp performance by Oregon Koto-Kai at 1:15pm at the Cathy Rudd Cultural Corner in the Jordan Schnitzer Japanese Arts Learning Center. This family-friendly performance will also feature storytelling. Members will tell the story Mochi Mochi No Ki (The Tree of Courage). The moving story is about a young boy, raised by his grandfather, confronting and overcoming his fears.

View Event
Center for Indigenous Midwifery
King County, WA

Faciliatated by partera Tema Mercado, CPM, LM
Spinning Babies® begins with fetal rotation to reveal the lesser known physiology of birth anatomy. Your passion, our approach. Start seeing solutions in labor progress with this new lens on childbirth. After this workshop you will be able to:
Facilitate comfort in pregnancy and ease in childbirth for your clients
Improve fetal position without manipulation of the fetus
Identify issues faster; gentle actions to shorten a long labor or avoid a cesarean
Use less (or no) force to resolve malposition and labor dystocia
And much, much more!
Spinning Babies® Three PrinciplesSM. Three BalancesSM, and Three Levels Solutions offers the world’s first complete system of birth preparation and labor ease concepts using baby’s position. Physiological techniques change the effective size of the pelvis through the body’s own innate capacity to resolve or prevent labor dystocia. Registration required.

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Centilia Cultural Center
Seattle, WA

Get your holiday shopping done early while you support BIPOC Small Business, Makers, Artists & Creatives all Evening long.

NO ENTRY FEE – ALL ARE WELCOME – ART – VENDORS – FOOD – LIVE MUSIC – PLANTS – DRINKS

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Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event
Holocaust Center for Humanity

Hear from executive coach and memoir author, Gail Weiss Gaspar, about how she reckoned with family secrets and the legacy of her father’s experience as a Holocaust survivor and how you can grow from trauma that may be holding you back from the life you want.

Gail Weiss Gaspar, MA, ACC, is a certified coach, an executive career strategist and the author of Carrying my Father’s Torch: From Holocaust Trauma to Transformation. She has a B.A. in Psychology from Ithaca College, an M.A. in Education/Human Resource Development from The George Washington University, and Professional Certifications from both The Coaches Training Institute (CTI) and International Coach Federation (ICF).

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event

Join disability justice advocate, Kristie Cabrera, and Indigenous ethnobotanist Dr. Enrique Salmón around the virtual table to unearth ways we can grow a food culture that centers accessibility and leaps courageously into the vibrant potential of the “gray spaces” that lie beyond extractive relationships to food and land.
Hosted by Food Culture Collective (FC Cltv), this free event is the most recent in our ongoing Around the Table conversation series.

This conversation will touch on the relational harmony evoked through Indigenous ecology and plant wisdom, and what disability justice looks like in the context of a radically accessible food culture.

Together, we’ll dig into the question of who gets to belong to the land and why, as we reimagine a world where belonging means to care for the lands, waters and people that nourish us.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

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Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

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Leonor R. Fuller Gallery
Olympia, WA

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Opening reception: Friday, November 11th 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Artist Talk: Saturday, November 19th 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Artist and Curator Selena Kearney, in collaboration with the Paimārire Studio on the Native Art Campus of The Evergreen State College, presents Coast Salish wool weavers and their processes. Ceremonial Coast Salish weavings offer protection for the wearer and exist in both the spirit and human worlds. Weavers bring thoughts of care and devotion to the loom as they produce their works. This exhibition of Coast Salish weavings highlights the stories and kinship embedded in the art form focused on strengthening bonds and helping others.

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From unreliability to intimacy, first-person offers the writer a rich arsenal with which to build tension, plot and characterization. But for Katie Kitamura, the shift to writing in the first person was also very personal, and had to do with her own relationship to my writing—where she located herself in her own fiction. In this craft talk, Kitamura will look at first person examples from some of her favorite writers, as well as her own work, to examine the opportunities and risks of the first person voice. Kitamura will be joined in conversation by Lucy Tan.

Word Works craft talks by novelists, essayists, poets, and memoirists focus on writing as process rather than finished product, examining how language works to inspire and provoke new ideas through live close readings of the writer’s own or others’ work. These talks are designed to apply to writers of all genres as well as illuminate well-known works for avid readers. The talks are followed by an interview with a noted editor, writer, or critic.

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In this immersive show, you turn the mic on while we take it off! Sing your favorite jams and you may get paired with a Candybox Revue burlesque performer dancing the art of the tease LIVE to your voice (or that of your reluctant friend)! This mashup has all the fun of karaoke mixed with burlesque performers improving!

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Event
Organization
Location
Cowlitz Tribe
DuPont, WA

The Cowlitz Indian Tribe Warriors Program is hosting a Cowlitz Holiday Bazaar fundraiser! This is a free event perfect for holiday shopping as handmade items will be sold. If you would like to enter the raffle, bring food or new socks to donate.

The bazaar will take place on Saturday, December 10th, 9am-5pm. See graphic for additional information!

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Nordic Northwest
Portland, OR
ScanFair brings Scandinavia to Portland through traditional food and drink vendors; an entertainment program focused on cultural heritage; games, activities, and crafts; and welcoming local community organizations.
Tickets are valid for both days! Just keep your wristband to access the 2nd day of festivities.
Saturday December 10th: 10am – 5pm
Sunday December 11th: 10am – 4pm
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Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event

The Winter Market at Rainier Beach Urban Farm & Wetlands is back! It’s happening Saturday and Sunday, December 10-11; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Come stock up on local winter produce like apples, potatoes and winter squash! We’ll also have your favorite local honey, jams, and pantry goods. This year we’re excited to showcase goods made by Tilth Alliance staff that have been sewn, crocheted, crafted and more! Our Maritime Northwest Garden Guide and other books, gardening tools, and other gift items will also be available.

We accept cash, credit, EBT, Fresh Bucks and offer SNAP Market Match.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Native Art Market Tacoma
Tacoma , WA

We are excited once again to offer our handmade goods for our 2 day holiday market from 11-4 on December 10th & 11th at ALMA Tacoma. We will have a diverse variety of items perfect for your holiday shopping.

View Event
Native American Youth and Family Center
Portland, OR

Visit our Winter Native Made Winter Marketplace each weekend through the month of December at the future site of our retail shop, right in the heart of Cully! Support Native artists and find the perfect gift for everyone in your life! There will be live music, refreshments and food in the surrounding Cully neighborhood!

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event
Indo Idaho Inc
Meridian, ID

Come and join us in celebrating christmas with Indo Idaho community.
Since this will be potluk, don’t forget to bring your favorite dish/drinks to share with everyone!
Hope to see you there!

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Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle
Seattle, WA

Strike A Pose is an monthly event that celebrates the ballroom community and showcase local BIPOC artists in a safe and affirming space.

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Event
Organization
Location
Nordic Northwest
Portland, OR
ScanFair brings Scandinavia to Portland through traditional food and drink vendors; an entertainment program focused on cultural heritage; games, activities, and crafts; and welcoming local community organizations.
Tickets are valid for both days! Just keep your wristband to access the 2nd day of festivities.
Saturday December 10th: 10am – 5pm
Sunday December 11th: 10am – 4pm
View Event
Buzzing Bee Events invites you to the second annual Jingle & Mingle Holiday Market at Tulalip Casino (Orca Ballrooms).
Featuring more than 100 vendors, a bar and more!
This is a great place to start your holiday shopping and support your local community by buying local instead at large national chain stores!
Many vendors will be offering great sales!
Santa will also be making an appearance!
View Event
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event

The Winter Market at Rainier Beach Urban Farm & Wetlands is back! It’s happening Saturday and Sunday, December 10-11; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Come stock up on local winter produce like apples, potatoes and winter squash! We’ll also have your favorite local honey, jams, and pantry goods. This year we’re excited to showcase goods made by Tilth Alliance staff that have been sewn, crocheted, crafted and more! Our Maritime Northwest Garden Guide and other books, gardening tools, and other gift items will also be available.

We accept cash, credit, EBT, Fresh Bucks and offer SNAP Market Match.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Stroum Jewish Community Center
Mercer Island, WA

Join us for an interactive Hanukkah storytime with two Sephardic children’s authors (one local, one world-renowned) as they share their Jewish Cuban family stories. Julie Anna Blank (“Hanukkah in Little Havana”) and Ruth Behar (“Tía Fortuna’s New Home: A Jewish Cuban Journey”) read their beautifully illustrated books for us. Then we’ll sing Hanukkah songs together, including Ladino/Sephardic favorite “Ocho Kandelikas.” You can also make a Hanukkah menorah out of snacks to enjoy during the event! Books make great Hanukkah presents, and the event is free with purchase.

In partnership with Jewish Book Council.
Sponsored by Samis Foundation.

Tickets
$5 (under age 2 FREE)
FREE with book purchase:

$15 Book: “Tía Fortuna’s New Home”
$20 Book: “Hanukkah in Little Havana”

View Event
Native Art Market Tacoma
Tacoma , WA

We are excited once again to offer our handmade goods for our 2 day holiday market from 11-4 on December 10th & 11th at ALMA Tacoma. We will have a diverse variety of items perfect for your holiday shopping.

View Event
Native American Youth and Family Center
Portland, OR

Visit our Winter Native Made Winter Marketplace each weekend through the month of December at the future site of our retail shop, right in the heart of Cully! Support Native artists and find the perfect gift for everyone in your life! There will be live music, refreshments and food in the surrounding Cully neighborhood!

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event
Northwest African American Museum (NAAM)

In celebration of Kwanzaa, enjoy a reading of My First Kwanzaa by Britney House. The book is a warm and lively introduction to a very special holiday that will help even the youngest children join in! This program is sponsored by City of Seattle Cultural Educatiand premieres on NAAM’s Youtube Channel every second Sunday of the month.

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Roots and Beats Project
Portland, OR

Our Winter Celebration will be a multimedia experience, alive with music, art, stories and stunning visuals! There will be delicious catering, a curated bar menu, silent auction and raffle as well as performances from local hip-hop and electronic musicians, Aztec dance, immersive video projection, and a chance to hear about our recent successes and exciting projects on the horizon.

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Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Surge Reproductive Justice
Seattle, WA

Join us in this long awaited celebration of our first community led research through the Our Words Build Power Campaign. The our words build power campaign is a community-centered research process around the structural and individual impacts on QTBIPOC health and wellness during the COVID-19 pandemic. Analyzed through a reproductive justice lens, and focused specifically on documenting our communities’ narratives of resistance and resilience in order to inform ongoing local and statewide advocacy and community organizing campaigns.

It’s been a time coming but this research is finally ready to be shared! We have partnered with local artists to compile the research gathered into a zine.

Come grab a copy, learn more about the Campaign, where it’s headed next, and how you can get involved.

We’ll be having catering from ChuMinh Tofu and Antojitos Lita Rosita.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event
Jewish Family Service
Seattle, WA

Join Rabbi Laura, Director of Project Kavod, for a light-filled, creative study and workshop on the themes of Chanukah. We’re excited to offer this event both in-person and virtually after several years of exclusive remote access. Please consider joining us on-site at JFS for a festive nosh and opportunity to connect to community during our festival of lights.

View Event
United Indians of All Tribes Foundation (UIATF)
Seattle, WA

Save the date for the annual holiday party for our United Indians of All Tribes families!

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event
National Association of Minority Contractors (NAMC) Oregon
Portland, OR

We could not be more excited to welcome you to the Oregon Convention Center, where we will celebrate the accomplishments of the NAMC Family and the broader community! For more information or to purchase tickets for the 2022 NAMC-Oregon Holiday Celebration, Email: events@namc-oregon.org

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Urban League of Portland
Portland, OR

We invite you to our 5th Urban League for All of Us Community Conversation in the Portland Metro area! Please save the date of December 15th 6:00 pm to 7:30 pm, this event will be virtual and in-person (location and final details to follow). Speakers will feature President and CEO, Nkenge Harmon Johnson, and other community members who will be our local hosts who will discuss the intersections of our public defense system and public safety. Please register for this event!

Registration for in-person attendance is capped at 75, please register as soon as possible.

View Event
The Rhapsody Project
Seattle, WA

Party and raise funds for the Rhapsody Workshop at King St Station, with a live music revue, food by Chef Tarik, and so much more.

The Rhapsody Workshop at King St Station will be our first-ever permanent home, and this party will teach you all about what’s to come, introduce you to our partners in the project, and fill you full of amazing, free food by Chef Tarik along with live music played by many branches of our community.

Dress code: Playfully Snazzy

Happy Hour: 6pm – 7pm

Live Music: 7pm – 9pm

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID
Come see art inspired by the McConnell Mansion, in the McConnell Mansion, September 28th from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served and Moscow Brewing Company will be there pouring beer. The art will be on display from September 27th until December 16th.
*SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED* Art pieces are due by September 21st. Swing by the Centennial Annex at 327 East Second St, Moscow, from 10:00 – 4:00. If you need other arrangements, please call 208-882-1004 or email lchslibrary@latahcountyid.gov
View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Hello lovely KVRU Fam Bam!
It has been a rough few year and we continue to be strong and build. I believe that radio is transformative and I know you do to… so everyone is invited KVRU & SEED Staff, Volunteers, Advisory Board Members, Community Partners, Producers, DJs, Media Educators to….
….BUILD with me! (see attached flyers)
BUILD RECONNECTION to close our year!
Who? you and us
What? Close out the year at our annual volunteer appreciation and holiday party
When? 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm – Friday, December 16, 2022
Where? the Rainier Arts Center like last year
How? Bring 1 main dish, 1 side dish, or 1 dessert
How? Bring a gift to exchange in our 1st annual white elephant gift exchange. This is the game of friendly gift stealing, but you need to bring a gift to get one. $10 or less limit.
How? Also, we might do karaoke or sing-a-longs
RSVP by emailing Lulu with attendance and dish

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Suquamish Tribe
Suquamish, WA

Free admission. Local vendors. Handmade gifts.

View Event
United Indians of All Tribes Foundation (UIATF)
Seattle, WA

Indigenous artists will be selling and showcasing handmade authentic arts and crafts. Beautiful work such as clothing, jewelry, woodworking, drums, art prints, and more by Native American Artists with many styles and tribes represented will be at Daybreak Star. This is a free event open to the public

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Native American Youth and Family Center
Portland, OR

Visit our Winter Native Made Winter Marketplace each weekend through the month of December at the future site of our retail shop, right in the heart of Cully! Support Native artists and find the perfect gift for everyone in your life! There will be live music, refreshments and food in the surrounding Cully neighborhood!

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event
Latah County Historical Society
Moscow, ID

We will also be collecting non-perishable food for local foodbanks

View Event
Queer The Land

Queer the Land is partnering with The Pride Foundation and local queer CHamoru artist Lourdez Velasco, known on social media as @TenderVirgo, to bring you a collaging practice that will guide you in reclaiming home and honoring your and our collective ancestors.

During this free event, participants will practice analog collaging skills and use creative materials to bring to life interpretations, memories, and reconfigurations of “home.” Some images will be provided in a buffet -style. Still, participants are encouraged to bring magazines, fabrics, items found in nature, paints, and other elements to tell a story through their collages.

This is a free event, but donations are encouraged. You can donate at https://alliedmedia.org/post/donate-to-queer-the-land. Donations go to support the liberatory work and capacity building of our Queer the Land team, the efforts and labor of our facilitator, and toward materials and food for our event. Donations also help sponsor the participation of QTBIPOC- identified folx in other events and program offerings. This event will have some sweet treats, so come with a sweet tooth and a desire to create with community.

View Event
Totem Star
Seattle, WA

Winter Magic is our annual youth music showcase that
happens every winter season! It’s a space where Totem
Star artists take their original work that they’ve
created and perform it live. It is a night filled with so
much authenticity, inspiration, and creativity.

View Event
Portland Mercado
Portland, OR

Join us at the Portland Mercado on December 17th for a community celebration of “Las Posadas”.
We will have live music, vendors, food and drinks!
Location: Portland Mercado – 7238 SE Foster Rd, Portland, OR 97206
We hope to see you and your family!

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Suquamish Tribe
Suquamish, WA

Free admission. Local vendors. Handmade gifts.

View Event
United Indians of All Tribes Foundation (UIATF)
Seattle, WA

Indigenous artists will be selling and showcasing handmade authentic arts and crafts. Beautiful work such as clothing, jewelry, woodworking, drums, art prints, and more by Native American Artists with many styles and tribes represented will be at Daybreak Star. This is a free event open to the public

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Native American Youth and Family Center
Portland, OR

Visit our Winter Native Made Winter Marketplace each weekend through the month of December at the future site of our retail shop, right in the heart of Cully! Support Native artists and find the perfect gift for everyone in your life! There will be live music, refreshments and food in the surrounding Cully neighborhood!

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event
White Center Community Development Association
Seattle, WA

Free Dinner Provided For Everyone! Thank you to Evergreen, Healthier Here, and the Na’ah Illahee Fund for this event series!

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event
Microenterprise Service of Oregon (MESO)
Portland, OR

With the generous support of Prosper Portland, MESO will be hosting our second annual MESO Makers Winter Market at Alberta Commons corner of MLK & Sumner St.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Shades of Light brings together ceramics, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and textiles from the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Linking these objects is the subtle role of light across a broad range of Korean creative practices. A Buddhist sculpture by Jang Jin-ik uses light as its medium, while our appreciation of ceramics and textiles may be determined by how light reflects off the surface of an object, or even travels through it. In other cases the interplay of light and dark is precisely what gives an image form. The exhibition highlights the superlative celadon glazes of the Goryeo period (918–1392) and the later taste for white porcelain in the Joseon period (1392–1897). Alongside historical examples are recent works by contemporary women artists Kim Yikyung and Joo Jiwan, who investigate these ceramic traditions in their own practice.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Since Otis Quaicoe’s move from Accra, Ghana, to Portland in 2017, his figural paintings have adjusted and shifted in congruence with a heightened cultural awareness of his relocated body. As he looked at Blackness and race in American society from the perspective of an African immigrant, Quaicoe became more interested in depicting the nuances of skin tone that emerge in velvety grayscale.

Quaicoe’s portraits do not just invoke identity of the painful bonds tying two continents together, but they simultaneously break down these layers of history and draw us into a more intimate conversation that transcends nationalities and brightens the discourse of the African diaspora experience.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

What is the relationship of humans to their environment? Japanese artists have considered this question in myriad ways, influenced as deeply by the tempestuous natural forces shaping life in this Pacific Rim island archipelago as by long-standing traditions of natural imagery in Japanese art, literature, and culture. The human connection to the natural world has taken on new meanings in the wake of March 11, 2011, when the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, followed by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, struck the northeast coast of Japan. This exhibition explores artistic responses to the environmental forces–some benign, some terrifying–that regulate life on this planet. The works featured here consider the ecological relationship between humans and our environment, encompassing mundane moments of daily life, meditative abstractions, and dystopian visions of the future.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

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Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota m