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Calendar

A collection of community-oriented events in and around the Northwest!

Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

View Event
Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

View Event
Hidden Gems Weekend Market
Tulalip, WA

we are open this weekend! saturday is looking like a 40% chance of rain (as of now) please bundle up, grab an umbrella & keep the chance of rain in mind regarding your items

We have 300 vendor spaces every weekend, and we accept ALL types of vendors 🤟🏽 we are currently seeking out sellers of:
•oddities and curiosities (taxidermy, preserved bugs, dolls, tarot, etc) 🪲
•indigenous arts n crafts 🪶
•woodwork crafts 🪚
•vintage items (clothing, decor, furniture, houseware) 📷
•plants 🪴
•food vendors who sell Asian, Ethiopian, Indian, vegan, Hawaiian, etc. 🍽️
Keep in mind, this isn’t ALL we’re looking for- it’s just at the top of our list! We are first come, first serve but if you’d like to learn more- just head on over to our website 🙂 and if you know anybody who’d be interested, share this with them- we’d greatly appreciate your help!

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

View Event
Seattle Art Museum
Seattle, WA

SAM presents American Art: The Stories We Carry, a transformation of its American art galleries, created through a wide-ranging collaboration among SAM curators and staff, artists, and advisors from the Seattle community. Funded primarily by a $1 million grant from The Mellon Foundation and a $75,000 grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art, the project features work from SAM’s collection and new works and curation by contemporary artists, and it deepens the museum’s commitment to inclusive exhibition-planning practices with a shared-authorship model that reflects and responds to community knowledge.

View Event

Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

View Event

What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

View Event

Join Beats of Redmond for the longest and biggest 𝐑𝐄𝐃𝐌𝐎𝐍𝐃 𝐑𝐀𝐉𝐀 𝐆𝐀𝐍𝐄𝐒𝐇 𝐔𝐓𝐒𝐀𝐕 𝟐𝟎𝟐𝟑 in WA. Over 3 days, we promise an unforgettable experience that will transport you to the vibrant spirit of Maharashtra’s Ganesh Festival. Our diverse range of activities caters to all ages, ensuring lasting memories.

𝐄𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐒𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐝𝐮𝐥𝐞:
𝟐𝟐𝐧𝐝 𝐒𝐄𝐏𝐓: Join us at 6 PM for the curtain raiser, showcasing the 15-foot Ganesha idol and magnificent decorations. Enjoy a vibrant procession with the Dhol-Tasha-Lazim-Zanza Pathak (Indian Percussion Band) featuring 100 artists.
𝟐𝟑𝐫𝐝 𝐒𝐄𝐏𝐓:Experience the Satyanarayana Puja, followed by Group Atharvashhishya pathan. Enjoy live music, dance performances, shopping bazaar, and food booths.
𝟐𝟒𝐭𝐡 𝐒𝐄𝐏𝐓:Witness cultural performances and the Grand Visarjan procession with Beats Of Redmond’s 100+ performers.

View Event

Our festival in 2023 will be the thirteenth Northwest Tea Festival
Join us for a fun and educational two-day event showcasing the multifaceted world of tea. The goal of the festival is to provide experiences covering all aspects of tea, from the cultural to the historical and the sensory to the scientific. The festival is appropriate for people of all ages and all levels of tea experience, from mildly curious folks to passionate, life-long aficionados.

Each year festival organizers bring together authors, industry experts, buyers, retailers, artists, and educators to help you experience something new and expand your enjoyment of this most fascinating of beverages!

Immerse yourself in the tea experience:

  • Sample some of the finest teas from all over the world.
  • Attend presentations led by leading tea authors and industry experts.
  • Meet premier tea and tea ware suppliers.
View Event
Nooksack Indian Tribe
Everson, WA

Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

View Event
Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

View Event

We are thrilled to announce our very first VOICES event, a day-long event created for BIPOC adoptees and by BIPOC adoptees. This FREE day-long event will be on Sunday, September 24. You can find more details and register on our Eventbrite (see linktr.ee)!

From 11am to 3pm, we will have programming for BIPOC adoptees, by us, including only us. This BIPOC adoptee-only programming includes a workshop with @conversationpodpiece facilitated by @patrickintheworld on narrative reclamation, adoptee storytelling, and social time to hang out with the BIPOC adoptee community.

From 4pm to 9pm, we will open the event to partners, friends, family, allies, and advocates who seek to support us, starting with a panel about adoptees in adulthood and our relationships with adoptive families facilitated by @adoptionmosaic. We will also have activities for intergenerational adoptee youth and social time for community building.

This event is FREE thanks to our partners Theatre Diaspora and MediaRites with funding by Metro Community Placemaking for the “Undefined and Overlooked” project and the generous community donors who have contributed through personal funds! We are still fundraising if you would like to donate: Eventbrite, Venmo, Cashapp, and Paypal. Please note “VOICES Community Event Donation.”

If you are a BIPOC adoptee and would like to table or be a vendor, please fill out the vendor form (linktr.ee). And if you are traveling from out of town, check out our travel guide (linktr.ee).

This event is meant to be a safe, inclusive space for all BIPOC, LGBTQIA2S+, and disabled members of our community. Steeplejack is ADA accessible. We will have an ASL sign language interpreter on site. Please contact us with questions or to communicate other accommodation requests.

A HUUUUUGE thank you goes to Theatre Diaspora (@theatrediaspora) and MediaRites (@mediarites) with funding by Metro Community Placemaking for the “Undefined and Overlooked” project. Their support and partnership are part of the backbone of this event. They are sponsoring the event, providing the space, and supporting the adoptee-centered programming. They have been central to making this happen!

View Event

I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

Attention Halloween lovers!! Need some Spooky art? Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery is proud to present their 1st Halloween themed art show!

Exhibition runs September 2nd-24th.
Gallery Hours: Thu-Sun 12pm-6pm

View Event

An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

View Event
Nooksack Indian Tribe
Everson, WA

Nooksack Indian Tribe is THRILLED to announce the 2023 Nooksack Days Pow Wow!

Camping and showers are available. All are welcome to attend. This is a drug and alcohol free event.

The Nooksack Indian Tribe is celebrating 50 years since their federal recognition on September 22, 1973. They are so excited to have a full week of events to celebrate Nooksack!

View Event
Alaska Native Justice Center
Anchorage & Virtual, AK

We invite you to participate and honor Missing and Murdered Indigenous Womxn, Girls, Two Spirit+ and all relatives through healthy healing. The 3rd annual MMIWG2S+ Alaska Run for Healing, Run for Justice is a virtual 5K run, walk, or other physical activity dedicated to honoring missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and all relatives. This is a free virtual event open to all to share their participation between September 19th-24th. This event is meant to raise awareness and provide a healthy healing activity for our community to join.

Register using this link: https://forms.gle/q8qTqhdGTroooWnq7
To receive your bib and packet.

While this is not a race or competition, you can share your participation in the FB event and registered participants will be entered into a drawing for a swag bag! Check out the FB event each day to see others participation and posts from the working group on how to stay involved!

If you’re in the Anchorage area on September 24th, join us for an in-person participation at 1:00pm at the Alaska Native Heritage Center Lake Tiulana. We are looking for a few volunteers to help us with set-up and breakdown! (Volunteer Form Here). We encourage people to have runs with others in their own communities as well!

View Event
Jack Straw Cultural Center
Seattle, WA

Jack Straw Kicks off the fall with an afternoon of music from Jack Straw Resident Artists Randal Bays and Clint Dye, Nic Masangkay, Medejin, Josh Nucci and friends, and Lindsey Strand-Polyak.

In person or streaming via YouTube and Facebook.

View Event
Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Mi Centro and Tacoma Art Museum (TAM), with support from Tacoma Creates, is excited to partner together to present special guest speaker Cheech Marin and “El Noroeste” art exhibit highlighting over 20 local Chicano/Latine art from across Washington State.

The exhibit dates will be Saturday September 23 – October 1, 2023. The free opening reception and Cheech Marin speaking engagement are scheduled to take place on Saturday, September 23rd from 2-5 p.m., with our guest speaker starting at 3 p.m. Both the exhibit and the opening reception with guest speaker will take place at the Tacoma Art Museum. This is a standing room only event with limited seating. Attendees can register for FREE

View Event

The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

View Event

Arciniega Street Productions proudly presents DRAG LOTERÍA! This monthly all-ages drag show features local Latinx and BIPOC drag artists and merges with an interactive game night that brings culture, community, and an exciting list of prizes.

On Sunday September 24th from 5-7PM, we’ll be at Cafecito Bonito enjoying incredible drag performances to your favorite songs, eating tapas, drinking mocktails and playing a fun cultural game together for several chances to win prizes from our favorite local businesses. **Our host will explain how the game works. Lotería is similar to how bingo is played. It’s kid-friendly and you do not have to be a native Spanish speaker to play!**

Playing cards are $3 per card, cash only. Between rounds of game play, there will be drag performances to your favorite songs by our favorite icons, Selena and Beyonce. PLEASE BRING $INGLES to tip our amazing lineup of drag performers! Our Sunday show features the talents of Dela Rosa, Ivanna, and Beyquance! Don’t miss out!

We strongly encourage folks to get tickets early as this show always sells out. Please bring cash for the drag show and for games. We will have change for larger bills until we run out. Coffee bar, non-alcoholic drink menu, and tapas will be available for separate purchase at Cafecito Bonito. Doors open at 4:45PM. Please note that any party that does not arrive by 5:35PM without notice forfeits their table.

**TICKETS SOLD ONLINE ONLY. NO TICKETS AT THE DOOR**

This is an all-ages event and the drag show is 100% family-friendly. Children are allowed, but all guests under the age of 18 must be accompanied by an adult.

REFUND POLICY: Due to high demand for this ticketed event, we do not offer refunds for any reason *except and unless* the event is canceled. This no-refund policy includes inability to attend as well as no-shows. We appreciate your understanding.

DISCLAIMER: We reserve the right to refuse service to anyone, which includes asking individuals to leave our event if they cause an unwelcome disturbance or trespassing individuals from the property entirely. Cafecito Bonito is a safe space for our community and Drag Loteria is a family-friendly event. We do not welcome hostility or judgment into the space.

NOTE: Lotería is a Mexican cultural game purely for amusement and community-building.

View Event

This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

View Event
Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

View Event
Seattle Art Museum
Seattle, WA

SAM presents American Art: The Stories We Carry, a transformation of its American art galleries, created through a wide-ranging collaboration among SAM curators and staff, artists, and advisors from the Seattle community. Funded primarily by a $1 million grant from The Mellon Foundation and a $75,000 grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art, the project features work from SAM’s collection and new works and curation by contemporary artists, and it deepens the museum’s commitment to inclusive exhibition-planning practices with a shared-authorship model that reflects and responds to community knowledge.

View Event

Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

View Event
Nooksack Indian Tribe
Everson, WA

Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

View Event

I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

View Event
Nooksack Indian Tribe
Everson, WA

Nooksack Indian Tribe is THRILLED to announce the 2023 Nooksack Days Pow Wow!

Camping and showers are available. All are welcome to attend. This is a drug and alcohol free event.

The Nooksack Indian Tribe is celebrating 50 years since their federal recognition on September 22, 1973. They are so excited to have a full week of events to celebrate Nooksack!

View Event
Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Mi Centro and Tacoma Art Museum (TAM), with support from Tacoma Creates, is excited to partner together to present special guest speaker Cheech Marin and “El Noroeste” art exhibit highlighting over 20 local Chicano/Latine art from across Washington State.

The exhibit dates will be Saturday September 23 – October 1, 2023. The free opening reception and Cheech Marin speaking engagement are scheduled to take place on Saturday, September 23rd from 2-5 p.m., with our guest speaker starting at 3 p.m. Both the exhibit and the opening reception with guest speaker will take place at the Tacoma Art Museum. This is a standing room only event with limited seating. Attendees can register for FREE

View Event

The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

View Event

This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

View Event
Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

View Event
Native Organizers Alliance (NOA)
Portland, OR

This two-week Indigenous-led campaign is bringing regional and national attention to the urgent need to recover Snake River salmon and uphold the federal government’s legally-binding commitments to Northwest Tribal Nations.

For millennia, salmon and the Snake and Columbia Rivers they call home sustained Indigenous peoples and cultures throughout the Northwest.

Today, salmon returns are dismal and many Northwest Tribal Nations are calling on the federal government to uphold their commitments and restore abundant salmon.

Show your support and join the All Our Relations Snake River Campaign in Portland, OR on Sept. 25!

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Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Partners in Diversity
Portland, OR

Partners in Diversity looks forward to seeing you at the 2nd biennial NW Equity Summit.

The conference focuses on helping employees and managers at all levels, as well as diversity influencers, be bold and uncompromising — in other words, unapologetic — when it comes to advancing and advocating for equity and inclusion.

Keynote Speakers
Lily Zheng, author of DEI Deconstructed and its sequel Reconstructing DEI
Michelle MiJung Kim, author of the Wake Up: Closing the Gap Between Good Intentions and Real Change
Breakout Session Speakers
Dr. Alisha Moreland-Capuia, Institute for Trauma-Informed Systems Change at McLean/Harvard
Elizabeth Laine, ClearWay Energy Group
Nikotris Perkins, Leadership Consultant, DNA Community Consulting
Breakout Session One
Structured Interviewing 2.0: Leveraging Process to De-Bias People Decisions with Elizabeth Laine
Unlearning White Supremacy Culture with Michelle MiJung Kim
Establishing Trauma Informed, Culturally Responsive Organizations and Leaders in Times Like These with Dr. Alisha Moreland-Capuia
You Can’t Rebuild What You Won’t Tear Down: DEI as Systems Change with Nikotris Perkins
Beyond the Business Case Panel Discussion with Dr. Miles Davis, Linfield University President; Sheila Murty, Executive Vice President of People & Culture for Tillamook County Creamery Association; Mini Ogle, Manager of Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion for Portland General Electric (PGE); and Angela Nelson Vice President for Equity, Diversity, & Inclusion at Travel Portland. Discussion moderated by Monica Lin-Meyer, Senior Managing Consultant & Executive Coach at Ernst & Young Global Consulting Services.
Breakout Session Two
Making Inclusion Measurable 2.0: A Practical Approach for Practitioners with Elizabeth Laine
[Specifically for Professionals of Color] Beyond Survival: Caring for Ourselves to Create a Sustainable Movement with Michelle MiJung Kim
Establishing Trauma Informed, Culturally Responsive Organizations and Leaders in Times Like These with Dr. Alisha Moreland-Capuia
Passion, Position, and Persistence: Outcomes and Centering Impact with Nikotris Perkins
Understanding and Mapping Power with Lily Zheng
Leading from the Middle Panel Discussion with Riikka Salonen, Managing Director of Health Equity at BCT Partners; Lee Fleming, Regional Supplier Diversity Manager for Skanska USA Building Inc; Tamara Kennedy, Director of Economic Development Trade & Economic Development Division for the Port of Portland; and Albert Lee, Executive Director of the Oregon Advocacy Commissions Office. Conversation moderated by Jeff Selby, Interim Director, City of Portland Office of Equity and Human Rights.
Special Breakout Session for CEOs: Inclusive Executive: Your Role in Building a Diverse, Equitable, and Inclusive Workplace with Lily Zheng
The summit features a special breakout session after lunch specifically for CEOs, presidents, executive directors, and provosts (i.e., organization’s top leaders). This session is for paid attendees and requires additional registration available at checkout.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

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Seattle Art Museum
Seattle, WA

SAM presents American Art: The Stories We Carry, a transformation of its American art galleries, created through a wide-ranging collaboration among SAM curators and staff, artists, and advisors from the Seattle community. Funded primarily by a $1 million grant from The Mellon Foundation and a $75,000 grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art, the project features work from SAM’s collection and new works and curation by contemporary artists, and it deepens the museum’s commitment to inclusive exhibition-planning practices with a shared-authorship model that reflects and responds to community knowledge.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

View Event

What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

View Event
Nooksack Indian Tribe
Everson, WA

Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

View Event
Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

View Event
Native Organizers Alliance (NOA)
Pasco, OR

This two-week Indigenous-led campaign is bringing regional and national attention to the urgent need to recover Snake River salmon and uphold the federal government’s legally-binding commitments to Northwest Tribal Nations.

For millennia, salmon and the Snake and Columbia Rivers they call home sustained Indigenous peoples and cultures throughout the Northwest.

Today, salmon returns are dismal and many Northwest Tribal Nations are calling on the federal government to uphold their commitments and restore abundant salmon.

Show your support and join the All Our Relations Snake River Campaign in Portland, OR on Sept. 25!

View Event

I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

View Event

An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

View Event
Nooksack Indian Tribe
Everson, WA

Nooksack Indian Tribe is THRILLED to announce the 2023 Nooksack Days Pow Wow!

Camping and showers are available. All are welcome to attend. This is a drug and alcohol free event.

The Nooksack Indian Tribe is celebrating 50 years since their federal recognition on September 22, 1973. They are so excited to have a full week of events to celebrate Nooksack!

View Event
Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Mi Centro and Tacoma Art Museum (TAM), with support from Tacoma Creates, is excited to partner together to present special guest speaker Cheech Marin and “El Noroeste” art exhibit highlighting over 20 local Chicano/Latine art from across Washington State.

The exhibit dates will be Saturday September 23 – October 1, 2023. The free opening reception and Cheech Marin speaking engagement are scheduled to take place on Saturday, September 23rd from 2-5 p.m., with our guest speaker starting at 3 p.m. Both the exhibit and the opening reception with guest speaker will take place at the Tacoma Art Museum. This is a standing room only event with limited seating. Attendees can register for FREE

View Event

The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

View Event

This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

View Event
Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

View Event
Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

View Event
Seattle Art Museum
Seattle, WA

SAM presents American Art: The Stories We Carry, a transformation of its American art galleries, created through a wide-ranging collaboration among SAM curators and staff, artists, and advisors from the Seattle community. Funded primarily by a $1 million grant from The Mellon Foundation and a $75,000 grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art, the project features work from SAM’s collection and new works and curation by contemporary artists, and it deepens the museum’s commitment to inclusive exhibition-planning practices with a shared-authorship model that reflects and responds to community knowledge.

View Event

Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

View Event

What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

View Event
Nooksack Indian Tribe
Everson, WA

Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

View Event
Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

View Event

This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

View Event

I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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Nooksack Indian Tribe
Everson, WA

Nooksack Indian Tribe is THRILLED to announce the 2023 Nooksack Days Pow Wow!

Camping and showers are available. All are welcome to attend. This is a drug and alcohol free event.

The Nooksack Indian Tribe is celebrating 50 years since their federal recognition on September 22, 1973. They are so excited to have a full week of events to celebrate Nooksack!

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National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition

Register now to join the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition (NABS) for a conversation on the newly amended Truth and Healing Commission Bill (S.1723).

Dr. Michael Yellow Bird will lead us in a closing mindfulness exercise as we prepare to go into the National Day of Remembrance. You do not want to miss this event!!

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Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center
Pendleton, OR

Towards the end of September, Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center
will be having a Corn Preservation Class at the Mission Longhouse. Class size is limited, be sure to register by calling 541.240.8697 or JenniferCross@yellowhawk.org. There will be supplies provided!

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Mi Centro and Tacoma Art Museum (TAM), with support from Tacoma Creates, is excited to partner together to present special guest speaker Cheech Marin and “El Noroeste” art exhibit highlighting over 20 local Chicano/Latine art from across Washington State.

The exhibit dates will be Saturday September 23 – October 1, 2023. The free opening reception and Cheech Marin speaking engagement are scheduled to take place on Saturday, September 23rd from 2-5 p.m., with our guest speaker starting at 3 p.m. Both the exhibit and the opening reception with guest speaker will take place at the Tacoma Art Museum. This is a standing room only event with limited seating. Attendees can register for FREE

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The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

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Hibulb Cultural Center
Marysville, WA

A weekly open forum for those interested in bringing weaving materials to work on projects. A time to visit, share build skills and complete your beautiful woven art.

This event is included in the price of admission.
Weaving kits available for purchase.
To register, please call 360-716-2600

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This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Raices de Bienestar is honored to present this talk with ¡Salud! The Oregon Pinot Noir Auction on Family Mental Health.
There are only have 25 spots available so sign up! To register or if you have questions about the event just call Claudia at (503) 681-4311.


Raices de Bienestar un honor presentar esta charla con ¡Salud! The Oregon Pinot Noir Auction sobre la salud mental de la Familia.
Sólo tenemos 25 espacios disponibles, así que regístrate! Para registrase o si tiene preguntas sobre el evento solamente tiene que llamar Claudia a (503) 681-4311.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

View Event
Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

View Event
Seattle Art Museum
Seattle, WA

SAM presents American Art: The Stories We Carry, a transformation of its American art galleries, created through a wide-ranging collaboration among SAM curators and staff, artists, and advisors from the Seattle community. Funded primarily by a $1 million grant from The Mellon Foundation and a $75,000 grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art, the project features work from SAM’s collection and new works and curation by contemporary artists, and it deepens the museum’s commitment to inclusive exhibition-planning practices with a shared-authorship model that reflects and responds to community knowledge.

View Event

Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

View Event

What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

View Event

Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

View Event
Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

View Event

This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

View Event

I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

View Event
Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Mi Centro and Tacoma Art Museum (TAM), with support from Tacoma Creates, is excited to partner together to present special guest speaker Cheech Marin and “El Noroeste” art exhibit highlighting over 20 local Chicano/Latine art from across Washington State.

The exhibit dates will be Saturday September 23 – October 1, 2023. The free opening reception and Cheech Marin speaking engagement are scheduled to take place on Saturday, September 23rd from 2-5 p.m., with our guest speaker starting at 3 p.m. Both the exhibit and the opening reception with guest speaker will take place at the Tacoma Art Museum. This is a standing room only event with limited seating. Attendees can register for FREE

View Event

The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

View Event

This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

View Event
Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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Town Hall Seattle
Seattle, WA

Prepare to be captivated by the unique fusion of North African blues and contemporary rhythms as the revolutionary band, Bab L’ Bluz takes the Great Hall Stage.

Fronted by Yousra Mansour, an African-Moroccan woman in a traditionally male role, Bab L’ Bluz is a driving force in reclaiming the blues for North Africa. Their music echoes with the spirit of the Moroccan ‘nayda’ youth movement, infusing rich local heritage with a modern rebellious attitude.

Experience the ancient and current, the funky and rhythmic, all amplified by Arabic lyrics, soaring vocals, and bass-heavy grooves. Bab L’ Bluz’s music pulses from the heart of the Maghreb, transcending borders and bringing people together through the universal language of music.

Don’t miss this exceptional night of cultural celebration and musical revolution at Town Hall Seattle!

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Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

View Event
Hedgebrook
Seattle, WA

Through the long haul of writing alongside or in voices that are outside of the personal “I”, this 3-day intensive navigates balancing research, ethics, representation, and publishing contracts while holding onto your own authentic voice. If you aspire to improve your craft, come learn from seasoned writers that are equipped to challenge, engage, and inform.

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

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Seattle Art Museum
Seattle, WA

SAM presents American Art: The Stories We Carry, a transformation of its American art galleries, created through a wide-ranging collaboration among SAM curators and staff, artists, and advisors from the Seattle community. Funded primarily by a $1 million grant from The Mellon Foundation and a $75,000 grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art, the project features work from SAM’s collection and new works and curation by contemporary artists, and it deepens the museum’s commitment to inclusive exhibition-planning practices with a shared-authorship model that reflects and responds to community knowledge.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

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This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

View Event

An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

View Event
Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Mi Centro and Tacoma Art Museum (TAM), with support from Tacoma Creates, is excited to partner together to present special guest speaker Cheech Marin and “El Noroeste” art exhibit highlighting over 20 local Chicano/Latine art from across Washington State.

The exhibit dates will be Saturday September 23 – October 1, 2023. The free opening reception and Cheech Marin speaking engagement are scheduled to take place on Saturday, September 23rd from 2-5 p.m., with our guest speaker starting at 3 p.m. Both the exhibit and the opening reception with guest speaker will take place at the Tacoma Art Museum. This is a standing room only event with limited seating. Attendees can register for FREE

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ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

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The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

View Event

This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

View Event
Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Please join us and our partners @TlingitHaida, @GoldbeltHeritage @JuneauSchoolsFamilyEngagement, and #JuneauMontessoriSchool as our community gathers together to observe events for Orange Shirt Day 2023.

Orange Shirt Day is an annual International Day of Remembrance for the children removed from their families by the U.S. Indian Boarding School system’s forced assimilation policy. It is a time to honor those who returned home and mourn those who did not, a time for truth-speaking, and for Indigenous and non-Indigenous people to heal as a community.

The Orange Shirt Day Gathering & Indigenous Pop-Up Market will be on Friday, September 29th, 5:00 – 8:00 PM at Harborview Elementary, and will be an evening of community connection and healing through cultural arts.

The Orange Shirt Day Mid-Morning Wave will be Saturday, September 30, from 9:00 – 11:00 AM at the Mendenhall Wetlands Turnout on Egan Highway (Near Sunny Point.) Community members are invited and encouraged to wear the color orange, wear their regalia, bring a drum, and bring banners and signs with loving messages of awareness. Coffee and donuts will be provided.

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Jack Straw Cultural Center
Seattle , WA

Applications are available now for Jack Straw’s 2024 Artist Support, New Media Gallery, and Writers programs! Learn more and apply at https://www.jackstraw.org/programs/residency-programs-faq/
Learn about these programs and how to apply for them, and enjoy live readings and music from Jack Straw artists Ebo Barton, Jim Cantú, Ching-in Chen, and Claudia Castro Luna.

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Native Organizers Alliance (NOA)
Lewiston, ID

This two-week Indigenous-led campaign is bringing regional and national attention to the urgent need to recover Snake River salmon and uphold the federal government’s legally-binding commitments to Northwest Tribal Nations.

For millennia, salmon and the Snake and Columbia Rivers they call home sustained Indigenous peoples and cultures throughout the Northwest.

Today, salmon returns are dismal and many Northwest Tribal Nations are calling on the federal government to uphold their commitments and restore abundant salmon.

Show your support and join the All Our Relations Snake River Campaign in Portland, OR on Sept. 25!

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Seattle, WA

Remember when it was all about groovy dances, alumni reunions, and the thrill of that first football game, maybe even a parade rolling down? Oh, the nostalgia!

This year’s 🍂 Falltactular 🍂 homecoming theme isn’t just a callback – it’s a roaring comeback! After laying low during the global pandemic, it’s time to burst back into the scene, showing off our fabulous fits, celebrating our achievements, and proving that we’re dancing through the storm–confetti and all!

Think of this as the homecoming re-do! 🌟 No date? No problem! Always dreamed of being homecoming royalty? Now’s your chance! Be the king, queen, duke, duchess, or even joker. Round up your friends, community, allies, peers, coworkers and family to be a part of it.

Whether you’re rocking heels or sneakers, coming solo or with your partner-in-crime, this homecoming is all about YOU.

So, put on your dancing shoes, and let’s make memories! Welcome back to the community that adores every bit of you.

🎈 Let’s Homecoming like never before! 🎈

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

View Event
Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

View Event
Northwest Translators and Interpreters Society (NOTIS)
Seattle, WA

Northwest Translators and Interpreters Society is proud to present its 2023 Annual Conference (#NOTIS2023) in honor of International Translation Day (#ITD2023). This lively event brings together translation & interpretation professionals throughout the Pacific Northwest. Come join us for a fun day of networking, conference sessions, panel discussions, and more with the best in the business!

As the United Nations states on their website, “International Translation Day is meant as an opportunity to pay tribute to the work of language professionals, which plays an important role in bringing nations together, facilitating dialogue, understanding and cooperation, contributing to development and strengthening world peace and security.” This is precisely what NOTIS endeavors to do—all year round—and we couldn’t do it without you.

So come on out and celebrate with us on September 30, won’t you? Don’t miss this opportunity to meet your present and future colleagues, earn CEUs, and learn more about the state of T&I in the Pacific Northwest and around the world!

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Join HTL for our September Ḵaa Tukax̱saké Héende Cross-Sector Equity Cohort! This month, we’ll learn about and engage in healing practices as we prepare for Orange Shirt Day on Sept. 30. Sign up now at the link in our bio, and for more info, contact htl@awareak.org.

View Event
Hedgebrook
Seattle, WA

Through the long haul of writing alongside or in voices that are outside of the personal “I”, this 3-day intensive navigates balancing research, ethics, representation, and publishing contracts while holding onto your own authentic voice. If you aspire to improve your craft, come learn from seasoned writers that are equipped to challenge, engage, and inform.

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

View Event
Seattle Art Museum
Seattle, WA

SAM presents American Art: The Stories We Carry, a transformation of its American art galleries, created through a wide-ranging collaboration among SAM curators and staff, artists, and advisors from the Seattle community. Funded primarily by a $1 million grant from The Mellon Foundation and a $75,000 grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art, the project features work from SAM’s collection and new works and curation by contemporary artists, and it deepens the museum’s commitment to inclusive exhibition-planning practices with a shared-authorship model that reflects and responds to community knowledge.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

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Columbia Basin Allied Arts, in collaboration with the Moses Lake Public Library, City of Moses Lake Museum & Art Center, Moses Lake Creative District, Downtown Moses Lake Association, EDUBS C/S, and Artisans Co. present the 2nd Annual UMANI Festival. The event will include a low-rider parade, live music, creative workshops, and more! All celebrating the amazing diversity of Hispanic cultures.

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This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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Experience holistic healing, cultural performances, food, fashion, vendors and stories from Seattle’s BIPOC communities.

Join us for a soulful journey at the Future Ancient Soul Healing Festival! This one-of-a-kind event will take place at Judkins Park in Seattle, WA, USA on Saturday September 30th 2023 from 12-8pm. Immerse yourself in a day filled with ancient healing practices and futuristic vibes.

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Filipino-American Association of the Inland Empire (FAAIE)
Spokane, WA

It’s that exciting time of the year once more! Our annual Pista sa Nayon is set for September 30th. We’re thrilled to announce that this year’s event is proudly sponsored by the City of Spokane, allowing us to share the beauty of Filipino culture with our wonderful community. This is a free event, so we invite everyone to join us and savor the delightful food, captivating entertainment, and all the fun brought to you by FAAIE.
Food is available in limited quantities and will be served on a first-come, first-served basis until supplies last.

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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Community for the Advancement of Family Education (CAFE)
Wenatchee, WA

Resource Fair • Vaccination • Mercadito
Food & Clothing Pantry • Music • Games • and much more!

Feria de Recursos • Vacunación • Mercadito
Despensa de Comida y Ropa • Música • Juegos • y mucho más!

Eres un Vendedor o tienes tu propio negocio? Estamos buscando vendedores para los eventos de Pachanga & Mercadito cada mes. El evento se llevara acabo cada ultimo sabado del mes!
Para llenar la forma simplemente vaya al enlace que esta disponible https://www.jotform.com/form/230435029488055
si ocupa asistencia o tiene preguntas por favor de llamar al (509) 239-5818.

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Walk the Block is back and bigger than ever.
Walk The Block is Wa Na Wari’s annual outdoor visual and performing arts festival that transforms Central District homes, businesses, parks, porches, and other common spaces into art installations and performance sites. Participants enjoy visual 2d and sculptural art, video installations, live music, dance parties, community stories, and more as they stroll the neighborhood with family and friends. Walk the Block is a chance to experience a slice of African American culture that defined the Central District as the hub for Black life in Washington State for over 70 years. Walk the Block brings visibility to a community that continues to adapt and grow in place, while creating a bridge to new residents who have recently arrived.
Walk the Block is also an important player in the revitalization of Seattle’s cultural community and economy at large. Development led to the displacement of working class people across the city, artists in particular. For a city whose international renown is partly anchored in the contributions of its artists, this continues to be a local challenge. Re-seeding the cultural landscape with opportunities for artists to live, work, and present is increasingly a public policy priority. Walk the Block is a draw for art lovers at large, and for public officials looking to support this vital sector and keep Seattle accessible and diverse all while helping to raise funds and build community with Wa Na Wari.Participants can arrive and begin the walk anytime between 2pm and 5:30pm. Dress warm and wear comfortable shoes.
Participating Artists:
Ephraim Asili (Filmmaker), Rashida Bumbray (Performance), Ayana Evans (Performance), Kevin Jerome Everson (Filmmaker), Ka’ila Farrell Smith Klamath Medoc (Painting), Ryan Feddersen (Performance/Sculpture) Femme Noire ( a Collaboration Between Black Puffin, Seattle Art Museum and Wa Na Wari with artists: Sheila Pree Bright, Jordan Casteel, M. Florine Démosthène, Eva Diallo, Adji Dieye, Marita Dingus, Esiri Erheriene-Essi Angèle Etoundi Essamba, Aramis O. Hamer , Bonnie Hopper, C. Davida Ingram, Rugiyatou Jallow, Lisa Jarret, Rachel Marsil, Thandiwe Muriu, Chidinma Nnoli, Chelsea Odufu, zakkiyyah najeebah dumas – o’neal, Ebony G. Patterson, Zandile Tshabalala, Kiki Turner), Mary Friesen Cree (Photography), Erin Genia Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Dakota (Sculpture), Christopher Harris (Filmmaker), Aisha Harrison (Sculpture), Charlene Komunale (Artist), Kent Monkman Fisher River Cree Nation in Treaty 5 Territory (Manitoba) (Multi-Media Artist), Melanie Stevens (Multi-Media Artist), Yirim Seck and Architects without Borders (Multi-Media Artwork), Ric’kisha Taylor (Multi-Media Artist), Thaddeus Turner (Music), The Last of the Red Hot Mamas (Music), Ya Tseen Tlingit and Unangax̂ (Music). Curated Stages:
Arte Noire, Fat’s Chicken & Waffles …..and more
Sponsors:
4Culture, BECU, Central Area Collaborative, Chihuly Garden & Glass, Converge Media, Gates Foundation, Inatai Foundation, Lululemon, Nesholm Foundation, One Reel, PCC Markets, Salal Credit Union, Seattle Art Museum, Seattle Space Needle, ScandiuzziKrebs, Social Justice Fund, Sup Pop, Team Diva Real Estate, Titos Vodka, Uplift Investment Group and Visit Seattle.
With Funding provided by the Seattle Office of Economic Development
Ticket Packages:
All pre-sale tickets will include a cookie from Shikorina Bakery. (Berbere Caramel or Vegan Gluten free Chocolate Chip.)
Early Entry Run/Walk (Comes with drink ticket)
$50
With this ticket, participants can run or walk the Walk the Block route to try and get their best time, or beat the crowds. This ticket allows for registration at 12:30pm with event access at 1:00pm.
Walk and Art: Map
$30
Enjoy the art walk with map.
Food Ticket
$50
Enjoy food from one Wa Na Wari’s Love Offering Chefs.
Walk the Block Tee-Shirt
$30
Get the 2023 Walk the Block Tee-Shirt with artwork by Amanda Howell Whithurst.
Walk the Block Sweatshirt
$65
Get the 2 we 023 Walk the Block Sweatshirt with artwork by Amanda Howell Whithurst.
FAQ:
When is Walk the Block?
Saturday, September 30th, 2023 from 2pm-6pm. Participants can arrive and begin the walk anytime between 2pm and 5:30pm.
​Where does the event start?
Registration is on the rooftop of Medgar Evers pool located at 500 23rd Ave, Seattle, WA 98122. Medgar Evers is directly across the street from Ezells Fried Chicken at 23rd and Jefferson, just north of Garfield High School. We are not able to ship Walk the Block purchases. If you miss Walk the Block, we can hold hoodies for you at Wa Na Wari, where you can pick them up during our open hours. We are not able to refund food & drink tickets or unused admission tickets.
We are within walking distance of the #2, #48, #3, and #4 buses.
What is the deadline to purchase tickets?
You can purchase tickets up to the day of. For swag tickets the deadline is September 24th, 2023.
Can I get a refund because of the weather, COVID, or my plans have changed?
We’re very sorry but all registrations are final. This event will go on rain or shine. If you can no longer attend your registration can be a donation. Please contact us for a tax receipt if you can’t attend.
How do I get my swag (Race Bib, Map, Drink & Food Tickets, and Umbrella?)
Cookies, food tickets, t-shirts and hoodies will be available for pickup at registration on the day of the event. Registration is on the roof of Medgar Evers Pool, not at Wa Na Wari.
How far is the walk? What if I get tired or need to use the bathroom?
The total distance of the walk is about .8 miles. You can walk, ride a bike, or drive. Rest and bathroom spots will be located on the event map. ​

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Mi Centro and Tacoma Art Museum (TAM), with support from Tacoma Creates, is excited to partner together to present special guest speaker Cheech Marin and “El Noroeste” art exhibit highlighting over 20 local Chicano/Latine art from across Washington State.

The exhibit dates will be Saturday September 23 – October 1, 2023. The free opening reception and Cheech Marin speaking engagement are scheduled to take place on Saturday, September 23rd from 2-5 p.m., with our guest speaker starting at 3 p.m. Both the exhibit and the opening reception with guest speaker will take place at the Tacoma Art Museum. This is a standing room only event with limited seating. Attendees can register for FREE

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ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

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Filipino Community of Seattle
Seattle, WA

Come celebrate the start of Filipino American History Month with a 2-day festival of arts, culture, food, and entertainment!
Day 1 – Saturday: there will be art, music, and dance; there will be food, and there will be FILIPINO CULTURE
Day 2 – Sunday: the Market Day with 10 food vendors and over 20 retail vendors inside the FCC Ballroom
GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!!!
the2ndpalengkeatFCSnight.eventbrite.com for Day 1
the2ndpalengkeatFCS.eventbrite.com for Day 2

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The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

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First Alaskans Institute
Anchorage, AK

Let’s support our Maui ʻohana!

Alaska for Maui is a benefit concert featuring the Hawaiian Reggae band H3. Join us for an evening of fun as we come together to give back to our Maui neighbors who have lost so much.

JOIN US!

A fundraiser to support the Hawaii Community Foundation’s Maui Strong Fund. The fund is providing financial resources to support the immediate and long-term recovery needs for the people and places affected by the devastating Maui wildfires.

Food trucks, cake auction, silent auction, Hawaiian dance performances, and H3. All of the proceeds will go directly to the Maui Strong Fund. If you cannot attend the concert, you can still make a donation to Maui Strong Fund. https://www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org/strengthening/maui-strong-fund

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This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Please join us and our partners @TlingitHaida, @GoldbeltHeritage @JuneauSchoolsFamilyEngagement, and #JuneauMontessoriSchool as our community gathers together to observe events for Orange Shirt Day 2023.

Orange Shirt Day is an annual International Day of Remembrance for the children removed from their families by the U.S. Indian Boarding School system’s forced assimilation policy. It is a time to honor those who returned home and mourn those who did not, a time for truth-speaking, and for Indigenous and non-Indigenous people to heal as a community.

The Orange Shirt Day Gathering & Indigenous Pop-Up Market will be on Friday, September 29th, 5:00 – 8:00 PM at Harborview Elementary, and will be an evening of community connection and healing through cultural arts.

The Orange Shirt Day Mid-Morning Wave will be Saturday, September 30, from 9:00 – 11:00 AM at the Mendenhall Wetlands Turnout on Egan Highway (Near Sunny Point.) Community members are invited and encouraged to wear the color orange, wear their regalia, bring a drum, and bring banners and signs with loving messages of awareness. Coffee and donuts will be provided.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Hedgebrook
Seattle, WA

Through the long haul of writing alongside or in voices that are outside of the personal “I”, this 3-day intensive navigates balancing research, ethics, representation, and publishing contracts while holding onto your own authentic voice. If you aspire to improve your craft, come learn from seasoned writers that are equipped to challenge, engage, and inform.

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MEXAM Northwest Festival
Seattle, WA

Seattle Aquarium invites you as they welcome members of the Hispanic and Latinx community in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month!

Explore the Aquarium’s habitats and enjoy a variety of themed activities, as well as talks with Spanish language interpretation.

Full schedule to come.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

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Seattle Art Museum
Seattle, WA

SAM presents American Art: The Stories We Carry, a transformation of its American art galleries, created through a wide-ranging collaboration among SAM curators and staff, artists, and advisors from the Seattle community. Funded primarily by a $1 million grant from The Mellon Foundation and a $75,000 grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art, the project features work from SAM’s collection and new works and curation by contemporary artists, and it deepens the museum’s commitment to inclusive exhibition-planning practices with a shared-authorship model that reflects and responds to community knowledge.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

View Event

Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

View Event
Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

View Event

This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

View Event

I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

View Event
Croatia Fest
Seattle, WA

An annual Pacific Northwest celebration of Croatian heritage and culture

View Event

An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

View Event
Seattle Catrina Festival
Seattle, WA

Directly from Mexico, @internationalseattlecatrinasfestival bring to Seattle the renowned world-class sculptor and artist, Mr. Hermes Arroyo, will be organizing a beautiful and spectacular exhibition of giant skulls, handcrafted and hand-painted, called “Seagiantskulls.”

The ribbon-cutting ceremony will take place on Sunday, October 1st, at 1:00 PM in Westlake Park, and this art exhibition will be open to the public free of charge from October 1st to October 31st in the following Seattle parks:

2+U, Bell Street Park, McGraw Square, Occidental Park, Pioneer Park, and Westlake Park.

View Event
Pacific Bonsai Museum
Federal Way, WA

Join us for a FUN & FESTIVE afternoon! Enjoy delicious bites and libations, live entertainment, and a stirring paddle raise in support of Pacific Bonsai Museum!

View Event
Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Mi Centro and Tacoma Art Museum (TAM), with support from Tacoma Creates, is excited to partner together to present special guest speaker Cheech Marin and “El Noroeste” art exhibit highlighting over 20 local Chicano/Latine art from across Washington State.

The exhibit dates will be Saturday September 23 – October 1, 2023. The free opening reception and Cheech Marin speaking engagement are scheduled to take place on Saturday, September 23rd from 2-5 p.m., with our guest speaker starting at 3 p.m. Both the exhibit and the opening reception with guest speaker will take place at the Tacoma Art Museum. This is a standing room only event with limited seating. Attendees can register for FREE

View Event
ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

View Event
Filipino Community of Seattle
Seattle, WA

Come celebrate the start of Filipino American History Month with a 2-day festival of arts, culture, food, and entertainment!
Day 1 – Saturday: there will be art, music, and dance; there will be food, and there will be FILIPINO CULTURE
Day 2 – Sunday: the Market Day with 10 food vendors and over 20 retail vendors inside the FCC Ballroom
GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!!!
the2ndpalengkeatFCSnight.eventbrite.com for Day 1
the2ndpalengkeatFCS.eventbrite.com for Day 2

View Event

The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

View Event

This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

View Event
Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

View Event
Native Organizers Alliance (NOA)
Seattle, WA

This two-week Indigenous-led campaign is bringing regional and national attention to the urgent need to recover Snake River salmon and uphold the federal government’s legally-binding commitments to Northwest Tribal Nations.

For millennia, salmon and the Snake and Columbia Rivers they call home sustained Indigenous peoples and cultures throughout the Northwest.

Today, salmon returns are dismal and many Northwest Tribal Nations are calling on the federal government to uphold their commitments and restore abundant salmon.

Show your support and join the All Our Relations Snake River Campaign in Portland, OR on Sept. 25!

View Event
Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

View Event
Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

View Event

Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

View Event

What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

View Event

Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

View Event
Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

View Event

This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

View Event

I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

View Event

An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

View Event
ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

View Event

The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

View Event

This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

View Event
Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

View Event
Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

View Event
Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

View Event

Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

View Event

What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

View Event

Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

View Event
Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

View Event

This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

View Event

I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

View Event

An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

View Event
ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

View Event

The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

View Event

Join Langston in celebrating the literary legacy of Octavia E. Butler on the 30th anniversary of the groundbreaking novel “Parable of the Sower.” Explore the cultural impact of this visionary work with our esteemed panelists, including adrienne maree brown, a transformative justice advocate and Octavia E. Butler scholar; Ayana Jamieson, founder of the Octavia E. Butler Legacy Network; and Daniel Simon, editor of Octavia Butler’s novels and champion of dispossessed voices. Moderated by queer Afrofuturist Isis Asare, this interactive discussion will delve into the power of Butler’s storytelling and its relevance today.

In October 1993, Four Walls Eight Windows published the first edition of Parable of the Sower by Octavia E. Butler. At the time, Butler was at the height of her literary career. The 1995 MacArthur Fellow already published the Patternist Series, Kindred – which would sell over 1M copies and the Xenogenesis Series with Doubleday & Company.

Parable of the Sower – the first book in an unfinished series – would be followed by Parable of the Talents in 1998. Set in a dystopian California in 2024, Parable of the Sower tells the story of how 15-year-old Lauren Oya Olamina creates community and develops a philosophy centered on the belief that God Is Change.

View Event

This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

View Event
Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

View Event
Polish Home Association
Seattle, WA

One of the oldest students-operated troupes in Poland will visit Seattle with their newest show “Sentymentalne Metamorfozy”.
This playful musical describes romantic relationship’s challanges in skits written by Julian Tuwin, Stefania Grodzieńska i Maria Hemara. Music selection includes classic Polish hits and songs written exclusively for the Teatr Hybrydy.

View Event
Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

View Event
Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

View Event

Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

View Event

What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

View Event
Trailing of the Sheep Festival
Hailey, ID

Join us for the 27th annual Trailing of the Sheep Festival October 4-8, 2023 to celebrate the history of sheep ranching in Idaho and the West!

View Event

Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

View Event
Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

View Event

This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

View Event

I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

View Event

An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

View Event
ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

View Event
Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

View Event

The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

View Event

This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

View Event
Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

View Event
Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

View Event
Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

View Event

Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

View Event

What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

View Event
Trailing of the Sheep Festival
Hailey, ID

Join us for the 27th annual Trailing of the Sheep Festival October 4-8, 2023 to celebrate the history of sheep ranching in Idaho and the West!

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

View Event
Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

View Event

This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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Please join the Asian Jewish Initiative of Seattle in the Sukkah for “Stories in the Sukkah” on Thursday, October 5 from 1:00-3:00PM PT at @templedehirschsinai on Capitol Hill! Open to members of the Asian and Jewish communities of Seattle, this program will include background on the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, a harvest holiday focused on agriculture and welcoming guests, followed by group conversations around themes of storytelling, food, and culture. Vegetarian food and drinks will be served and spots are limited. Please register here by September 28! https://tinyurl.com/4nndhdzx

The Asian Jewish Initiative of Seattle is an effort started in 2022 with the goals of fostering community, advancing civil rights, and fighting discrimination. Member organizations include @adlpnw, Chinese Information and Service Center (CISC), American Jewish Committee (AJC) Seattle, @hchseattle, @support_ichs, Khalsa Gurmat Center, @jfs_seattle, the Washington State Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs (CAPAA), @seattlejacl, @jcrcseattle, @ocagreaterseattle, Temple de Hirsch Sinai, Temple Beth Am, the @wsjhs, and @winglukemuseum.

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ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

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This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

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Join Us
We are witnessing a new era of whitewashing. Book bans, censorship, and attempts to sanitize our nation’s past are all on the rise – so it’s more important than ever that we raise our voices and collectively refuse to be silenced. Join us for a conversation with “Love in the Library” author Maggie Tokuda-Hall, who bravely stood up against Scholastic Inc. earlier this year when they attempted to censor her use of terms like “racism” in an author’s note about her grandparents’ incarceration experience.

Documenting stories and fearlessly speaking the truth is core to what we do at Densho. And while we uplift the voices of thought leaders like Maggie and WWII incarceration survivors alike, we need your help in carrying that work into the future. Please join us for this evening of conversation, performance, and capacity-building for Densho.

This one-hour virtual program is free to all who register. In addition to a featured conversation between Maggie Tokuda-Hall and Densho Executive Director Naomi Ostwald Kawamura, the program will include a live musical performance by Tomo Nakayama, a poetry reading by traci kato-kiriyama, and will be hosted by Erin Shigaki and Brady Wakayama.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Seattle, WA

ABC Seattle is now trying out ramen outside for just meet ups! Everyone is still welcome to self-organize a ride from your neighborhood via discord. weather is looking clear to ride as of today!

LOCATION: figurehead brewing (4001 21st Ave W unit b, Seattle, WA 98199) for @yonaka63

*midnite ramen is brought to you by elmer komagata and his wife, izumi. the ramen ‘yatai’ or ramen foodcart started as early as the 1900’s in japan. these carts served from sunset ’til dawn, often known as ‘yonakisoba’ or midnight ramen. they are currently working on construction for a permanent location on stoneway!

WHAT TO BRING: if you plan on riding, bring lights and extra warm layers for when the sun sets! it’s getting cold early now. feel free to bring your own dinner.

*this is open to all bipoc and multi-racial identities

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Unkitawa is excited to announce that their Culture kitchen this Thursday, class is on sugar pumpkins and corn.

Chef Marci is preparing crab, pumpkin frybread and wild rice. The remainder of the class is to teach about all the uses of corn throughout the season and the many health benefits.

Their are looking forward to seeing everyone and share a meal with good conversations.

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Join NAAM for our October First Thursdays program, an advanced film preview of the Seattle Black Panthers Fight for Justice and Freedom Documentary Film. Following the film preview, there will be a Q&A session with activist, author, and former captain of the Seattle Chapter of the Black Panther Party, Mr. Aaron Dixon and director and producer of the documentary film, Mr. Rick DuPree. Mr. Aaron Dixon will also discuss and sign copies of his book My People are Rising: Memoir of a Black Panther Party Captain.

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MEXAM Northwest Festival
Seattle, WA

The Northwest Orchestra and MEXAM NW Festival invite you to this classical and chamber music concert that will take place at Good Shepherd Chapel.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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In the spirit of “gathering (n. / v.), To Gather supports and elevates the work of artists who use movement to excavate the rich stories that exist within the Black and Brown dancing body.

To Gather is a celebration of dance artists residing and creating along the West Coast. Over two weekends, guest curators Nia-Amina Minor and David Rue invite choreographers and performers to convene and present new work to the Seattle community. To Gather supports and elevates the work of artists who use movement to excavate the rich stories that exist within the Black and Brown dancing body. In the spirit of “gathering (n. / v.),” this program encourages audiences and artists alike to witness, engage, and commune while supporting new works.

Week 1 features the work of guest choreographer Maurya Kerr (tinypistol) & local Seattle artists, including Akoiya Harris, Symone Sanz, and Cipher Goings + Benjamin Hunter.

Week 2 features the work of guest choreographer Bernard Brown (bbmoves) & local Seattle artists, including Jade Solomon Curtis, Emma Wambui, and Umalalengua Okan + Milvia Berenice Pacheco Salvatierra in collaboration with Naomi Macalalad Bragin.

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Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

View Event

Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

View Event

What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

View Event
Trailing of the Sheep Festival
Hailey, ID

Join us for the 27th annual Trailing of the Sheep Festival October 4-8, 2023 to celebrate the history of sheep ranching in Idaho and the West!

View Event

Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

View Event
Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

View Event

Free admission

The St. Nicholas Dancers will be back with periodic performances in the tent

Traditional assortment of hand made Greek pastries at the Coffee Shop and Bakery

Food booths: Gyros, Calamari, Greek Fries, Souvlaki (sausage), Loukomathes

Appetizers: Spanakopita, tiropita, dolmathes served all 3 days from the church kitchen

Dinner entrees served from the kitchen

View Event

This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

View Event

I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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TCMoFA is returning to 509 4th ave east for fall arts walk!
This exhibition will feature indigenous artists only, and will be open through the weekend into Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

In honor of Indigenous Peoples’ Day, the Thurston County Museum of Fine Arts is becoming the Coast Salish Museum of Fine Arts
Their Fall Arts Walk exhibition featuring exclusively Indigenous artists will take place on traditional Squaxin, Nisqually, and Cowlitz land in the Salish Sea region of Turtle Island.

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

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Earshot Jazz Society of Seattle
Seattle , WA

The Earshot Jazz Festival returns this year with performances from both resident and world renowned artists at venues all around Seattle!
Earshot Jazz Festival is back with “Seattle’s most important annual jazz event” (DownBeat), once again presenting today’s brilliant jazz artists over the course of 30 fall days in venues all around the city. In programming across four weeks, they’ve created a series that embodies the history, evolution, and spirit of jazz as it exists around the world as well as right here at home. Noted as, “a festival of adventurous au courant jazz” (JazzTimes), the festival kicks off on October 6 and winds down on November 5. In between are concerts and events by established legends and exciting emerging artists, truly representing today’s most dynamic and diffuse art form.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

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This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

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Northwest African American Museum (NAAM)
Seattle, WA

NAAM is thrilled to welcome esteemed guests and museum supporters to enjoy an intimate cocktail affair with live music, artistic performances, and an inspirational program. Our theme TRANSFORMATIONS, looks to present audiences with a new transformative way to engage with the museum as we head into a new era of NAAM.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Seattle Latino Film Festival
, WA

Seattle Latino Film Festival was founded in 2009 by Jorge Enrique Gonzalez Pacheco, a Cuban international award-winning poet, film industry professional, and cultural entrepreneur. Jorge had a vision to create a film festival in Seattle for Latino artists and filmmakers. The Seattle Latino Film Festival is the only one of its kind in the entire Northwest of the United States. Although the organization operates under budget, the staff are passionate about the films that the festival presents, and are grateful to the film industry for supporting this organization.

The Festival runs during the month of October to coincide with the National Hispanic Heritage Month. SLFF includes international filmmakers, producers, and actors with the specific purpose of engaging the Seattle community with cross-cultural perspectives, and to create a forum to explore those perspectives, many of which are integral to the experience of “Latinidad.”

SLFF is a source of education and entertainment for friends, families and allies. Every October, for ten days, many Hispanic countries appear on movie screens throughout the Seattle Metro area. Festival attendees sample the many distinctive cultural “flavors” uncommon to this side of the world, alleviating the ignorance of who we are.

Our films are diverse and multi-thematic, celebrating our daily experiences including music, literature, dance, and painting through a variety of cinematographic genres.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival has established partnerships with organizations such as the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture, ArtsFund, 4Culture, WA State Arts Commission, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle University, College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington, the Northwest Film Forum, Heritage Bank, King5 News, Univision Seattle, Delta Air Lines & Aeromexico, Microsoft, Seattle Art Museum, Huelva Iberoamerican Film Festival in Spain, Berlin in Germany, Cine Latino de Toulose in France among others. Our Film Festival attracts a politically-aware and diverse demographic. Since its first festival in 2009, we attract over 1000 attendees each year. We have been the recipient a three-year Civic Partner Grant from the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival is an entirely volunteer-run organization. Each person who contributes time to the organization is considered a key player. Our volunteers continue to establish new partnerships.

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Undocumented / Sin papeles
(Canada, 90 min. 2022)
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE
**** Chilean Actor & Director Christian de la Cortina, and the Mexican Actor Jorge Martinez Colorado will attend.
Director: Christian de la Cortina
Producer: Vanesa Caceres
Cast: Christian de la Cortina, Kimberly Huffman, Sonia Martinez, Luis Oliva, Jorge Martinez Colorado
Genre: Immigration & Drama
Language: English, Spanish w/ English subtitles
Synopsis: Fearing for his life, Fernando, a Mexican man with a mysterious past, seeks asylum in the United States. After spending six months in an ICE detention center, he is released with an electronic ankle monitor, awaiting the processing of his status in the country. Fernando finds an illegal job on a dairy farm in Vermont, where he meets other undocumented workers, Pablo, Juan, and Carolina. What could have been a safe haven turns into a hellish situation. Fernando will have no choice but to take matters into his own hands, but his actions will have significant consequences for everyone involved.
Sinopsis: Temiendo por su vida, Fernando, un mexicano con un pasado misterioso, busca asilo en los EE.UU. Después de pasar seis meses en una cárcel de ICE, es liberado con un grillete (tobillera electrónica) esperando que su estatus en el país sea tratado. Fernando logra conseguir un trabajo ilegal en una granja lechera de Vermont donde se encuentran otros trabajadores sin papeles, Pablo, Juan y Carolina. Lo que podría haber sido un refugio seguro termina siendo un infierno. A Fernando no le quedará otra que hacer algo al respecto, pero sus acciones tendrán grandes consecuencias para todos.

*Movie Content Warnings: Violence & Nude Scenes.
Prior to the movie we will screen the 2 minutes poetry short Enough, directed by the Colombian Susana Montoya Quinchia, based on a poem, a Mexican immigrant takes the stage in front of an imaginary audience and explores the different personas she’s had to create to be accepted in American society. Through the distinct stereotypes shes been forced to inhabit, her real self is revealed.

*Ticket Price includes Movie & Party with Authentic Mexican Food.
RED CARPET WILL STARTS AT 6:30 PM UNTIL 7:30 PM
RECEPTION WILL STARTS AT 9:30 PM UNTIL 11:00 PM

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Arciniega Street Productions
Anchorage, AK

Arciniega Street is proud to partner with Momentum Studios once again to bring you VIBRAS – the highly anticipated Q3 installment of our quarterly drag, diva and burlesque show: VIBES.

This sexy and artistic show indeed serves up all the vibes, featuring an absolutely STACKED lineup of exciting Latine artists who will be giving the hottest drag and burlesque performances to your favorite high energy Latin music. Due to popular demand, we’ve added a second show date for this production, so VIBRAS is happening Friday, October 6th at 7PM and Sunday, October 8th at 7PM at Momentum Studios (formerly Studio C) in Midtown. This incredible, dynamic all-Latin cast is star-studded across the line. VIBRAS will be hosted by Dela Rosa, with electric performances by burlesque artists Isabella Novela and Sweet Rika, drag artists athena nuff, Ivanna Kischacok, and featuring two very special guests: flying in from Seattle, drag artist Glenn Coco and flying in from Portland, award-winning burlesque artist, Chola Magnolia!

Cash bar on site. This is a 21+ only show, proof of ID required upon entry. We have other all-ages shows on our page, just not this one! Please drink responsibly.

Doors open at 6:45. Don’t miss out!

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Eugene, OR

Come celebrate and explore the diverse and dynamic experiences of the South Asian diaspora through art, comedy, dance, music, spoken word, and more.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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In the spirit of “gathering (n. / v.), To Gather supports and elevates the work of artists who use movement to excavate the rich stories that exist within the Black and Brown dancing body.

To Gather is a celebration of dance artists residing and creating along the West Coast. Over two weekends, guest curators Nia-Amina Minor and David Rue invite choreographers and performers to convene and present new work to the Seattle community. To Gather supports and elevates the work of artists who use movement to excavate the rich stories that exist within the Black and Brown dancing body. In the spirit of “gathering (n. / v.),” this program encourages audiences and artists alike to witness, engage, and commune while supporting new works.

Week 1 features the work of guest choreographer Maurya Kerr (tinypistol) & local Seattle artists, including Akoiya Harris, Symone Sanz, and Cipher Goings + Benjamin Hunter.

Week 2 features the work of guest choreographer Bernard Brown (bbmoves) & local Seattle artists, including Jade Solomon Curtis, Emma Wambui, and Umalalengua Okan + Milvia Berenice Pacheco Salvatierra in collaboration with Naomi Macalalad Bragin.

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MEXAM Northwest Festival
Seattle, WA

Buy tickets: https://cart.seattlesymphony.org/25672/25675

Los Angeles-based Guatemalan singer-songwriter Gaby Moreno has redefined Americana music with critically acclaimed musical collaborations in both English and Spanish, and songs written for mainstream film and TV, including the theme song for NBC’s Parks and Recreation.

She has released four albums, toured with David Gray, Tracy Chapman, Ani DiFranco, Punch Brothers, Calexico, Neko Case, Los Lobos and Nickel Creek, and has shared the international stage with luminaries such as Bono and Andrea Boccelli, as well as being a frequent guest on Chris Thile’s Live From Here public radio show.

Moreno’s latest studio album, Alegoría, received a 2023 GRAMMY® nomination for Best Latin Rock or Alternative Album. Moreno brings her one-of-a-kind sound to Benaroya Hall for one night only.

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Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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Greater Kent Historical Society
Kent, WA

Join us for the 7th annual We Are History Keepers event. Learn how you can preserve and share your community’s untold stories. The workshop will be on October 7th from 9:30am-1pm at Kent Commons. This free event is open to everyone.

Please RSVP using this link- https://forms.gle/iHbrTN6s7q1wYnSL8

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Trailing of the Sheep Festival
Hailey, ID

Join us for the 27th annual Trailing of the Sheep Festival October 4-8, 2023 to celebrate the history of sheep ranching in Idaho and the West!

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

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Free admission

The St. Nicholas Dancers will be back with periodic performances in the tent

Traditional assortment of hand made Greek pastries at the Coffee Shop and Bakery

Food booths: Gyros, Calamari, Greek Fries, Souvlaki (sausage), Loukomathes

Appetizers: Spanakopita, tiropita, dolmathes served all 3 days from the church kitchen

Dinner entrees served from the kitchen

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Spokane United We Stand
Spokane, WA

Live Performances
Arts&Crafts
FREE Chai & Indian Sweets Samples
Cultural Demos
Meet & Greet Local Organizations & Artists
FREE ADMISSION. Plus More!


Diwali, also known as the Festival of Lights, is one of the most important festivals of the year in India, celebrating the victory of good over evil and light over darkness. It tops all other festivals with its long-lasting and multi-faith celebrations in India.
The importance of Diwali for Indians is like Christmas’s for Westerners.

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This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

View Event

Save the date and come and celebrate with us, We have a great line up of Indigenous music performers, dancers, and good food. There will be vendors too.

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TCMoFA is returning to 509 4th ave east for fall arts walk!
This exhibition will feature indigenous artists only, and will be open through the weekend into Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

In honor of Indigenous Peoples’ Day, the Thurston County Museum of Fine Arts is becoming the Coast Salish Museum of Fine Arts
Their Fall Arts Walk exhibition featuring exclusively Indigenous artists will take place on traditional Squaxin, Nisqually, and Cowlitz land in the Salish Sea region of Turtle Island.

View Event

An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

View Event
ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

View Event
Earshot Jazz Society of Seattle
Seattle , WA

The Earshot Jazz Festival returns this year with performances from both resident and world renowned artists at venues all around Seattle!
Earshot Jazz Festival is back with “Seattle’s most important annual jazz event” (DownBeat), once again presenting today’s brilliant jazz artists over the course of 30 fall days in venues all around the city. In programming across four weeks, they’ve created a series that embodies the history, evolution, and spirit of jazz as it exists around the world as well as right here at home. Noted as, “a festival of adventurous au courant jazz” (JazzTimes), the festival kicks off on October 6 and winds down on November 5. In between are concerts and events by established legends and exciting emerging artists, truly representing today’s most dynamic and diffuse art form.

View Event
Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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Casa Latinos Unidos
Corvallis, OR

Casa Latinos Unidos is very excited to invite you to the event celebrating the cultures that we are organizing with great love for all of you:”Hispana Afternoon”!

At Casa Latinos Unidos (CLU), we would love to have you come with all your family and friends. No prior registration required but you do want to enjoy and celebrate in community. This event is an opportunity to celebrate together our Hispanic heritage, remember what unites us and enjoy an afternoon full of activities for the whole family.

Come and be a part of this celebration of diversity, where we will learn from each other and strengthen the bonds that unite us as a community. The “Hispanic Afternoon” is an event open to all!

Don’t miss it, there will be music, food, and lots of surprises. We hope to see you there!


Casa Latinos Unidos es muy emocionados de invitarlos al evento de celebración de las culturas que estamos organizando con mucho cariño para todos ustedes: ¡”Tardeada Hispana”!

En Casa Latinos Unidos (CLU), nos ecantaría que vengas con toda tu familia y amigos. No se requiere inscripción previa pero sí muchas ganas de disfrutar y celebrar en comunidad. Este evento es una oportunidad para celebrar juntos nuestra herencia hispana, recordar lo que nos une y disfrutar de una tarde llena de actividades para toda la familia.

Ven y sé parte de esta celebración de la diversidad, donde aprenderemos unos de otros y fortaleceremos los lazos que nos unen como comunidad. ¡La “Tardeada Hispana” es un evento abierto a todos!

No te lo pierdas, habrá música, comida, y muchas sorpresas. ¡Esperamos verte allí!

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Celebrate Potlatch Fund, the Community, Arts, and Culture. This is their main event of the year and they are excited to be back in-person with our relatives! Join them on the lands of the Tulalip Tribes to uplift the past 20 years of Potlatch Fund, working to support our relatives in art, capacity, nonprofits, and building community. They look forward to seeing you there in celebration of the next 20 years!

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The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

Join us at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery for the opening reception of our 4th Annual Dia de los Muertos Art Show.
Opening Reception October 7th 5pm-7pm
Exhibition dates October 7th-November 5th
Gallery Hours Thursday-Sunday 12pm-6pm

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This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Social Justice Fund NW
Seattle, WA

You’re invited to SJF’s 45th Birthday Party on Saturday, October 7th! This will be another special hybrid event so whether you join us in-person in Seattle at the historic Washington Hall or attend virtually, we’re excited to build community with you.

Because this is an extra special celebration, we’re shaking things up: this year we’ll have no keynote speaker and instead our focus will be on YOU, our community. We’re inviting some of SJF’s most dedicated members, volunteers, and folks we look up to as progressive leaders to share the stage. We’ll have inspiring speeches, updates from the SJF staff, delicious food for in-person attendees from Off The Rez, and we guarantee you’ll learn more about what organizing currently looks like throughout our five-state region.

This year we’re grounding in celebration and joy by hosting an SJF Birthday Party; we’re not choosing this theme because times feel light or overly celebratory—just the opposite, in fact. We chose it because we believe joy and abundance are critical to center when doing social justice work. Stopping to fill our cups allows us to give more to community, more to the movement. We invite you to come and celebrate our journey as an organization, but also to celebrate the collective work and labor that we’ve put in together over the past weeks, months, and (45!!) years as folks committed to building and supporting progressive social movements.

Want to volunteer your time for social justice events? Sign up as day-of event support or get out in community a Table Captain! Table Captains help spread the word and bring in 7-10 folks with them, either in-person or virtually—making our party that much more of a celebration!

We can’t wait to party with you!

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Langston
Seattle , WA

Lakema Bell’s One Woman Show, Tell It Like It ‘TIS‘ invites you to embark on a heartfelt journey through a spectrum of emotions, from spiritual ritual laughter to moments of shock, joy, sadness, and ultimate victory.

As Lakema gracefully navigates through the pervasive challenges of white supremacy, you’ll witness her reawakening, as she rediscovers her voice and rekindles her joy. Her odyssey takes her through the depths of mental illness, the anguish of her children’s suffering, the weight of internalized racial inferiority, the quest to emerge from her mother’s shadow, and the determination to raise her own children in a manner different from her upbringing.

Lakema Bell is a luminary in the realm of African-Centered Thought Artistry. She is a catalyst for change, a dedicated community activist, a mesmerizing African dancer and instructor, a masterful choreographer, an adept event and grant manager, a motivational powerhouse, a trusted coach, a devoted wife of 23 years, and a nurturing mother of four.

At the helm of The Skin I’m In LLC, an African-centered organization, Lakema empowers individuals to embrace self-confidence and body positivity through the transformative medium of African Dance. Her culturally curated experiences, facilitation skills, and unwavering commitment serve as the tools for self-discovery and self-awareness.

Get tickets today to experience this exceptional blend of artistry and storytelling hosted by LANGSTON Seattle, where Black Brilliance shines.

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Grupo Folklorico Herencias Mexicanas
Everett, WA

Herencias Mexicanas is excited to announce their annual showcase! Join them on 10/7/23 at the PUD Auditorium. Featuring a special performance by Joyas Mestizas

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Seattle Latino Film Festival
, WA

Seattle Latino Film Festival was founded in 2009 by Jorge Enrique Gonzalez Pacheco, a Cuban international award-winning poet, film industry professional, and cultural entrepreneur. Jorge had a vision to create a film festival in Seattle for Latino artists and filmmakers. The Seattle Latino Film Festival is the only one of its kind in the entire Northwest of the United States. Although the organization operates under budget, the staff are passionate about the films that the festival presents, and are grateful to the film industry for supporting this organization.

The Festival runs during the month of October to coincide with the National Hispanic Heritage Month. SLFF includes international filmmakers, producers, and actors with the specific purpose of engaging the Seattle community with cross-cultural perspectives, and to create a forum to explore those perspectives, many of which are integral to the experience of “Latinidad.”

SLFF is a source of education and entertainment for friends, families and allies. Every October, for ten days, many Hispanic countries appear on movie screens throughout the Seattle Metro area. Festival attendees sample the many distinctive cultural “flavors” uncommon to this side of the world, alleviating the ignorance of who we are.

Our films are diverse and multi-thematic, celebrating our daily experiences including music, literature, dance, and painting through a variety of cinematographic genres.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival has established partnerships with organizations such as the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture, ArtsFund, 4Culture, WA State Arts Commission, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle University, College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington, the Northwest Film Forum, Heritage Bank, King5 News, Univision Seattle, Delta Air Lines & Aeromexico, Microsoft, Seattle Art Museum, Huelva Iberoamerican Film Festival in Spain, Berlin in Germany, Cine Latino de Toulose in France among others. Our Film Festival attracts a politically-aware and diverse demographic. Since its first festival in 2009, we attract over 1000 attendees each year. We have been the recipient a three-year Civic Partner Grant from the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival is an entirely volunteer-run organization. Each person who contributes time to the organization is considered a key player. Our volunteers continue to establish new partnerships.

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Arciniega Street Productions
Anchorage, AK

Arciniega Street is proud to partner with Momentum Studios once again to bring you VIBRAS – the highly anticipated Q3 installment of our quarterly drag, diva and burlesque show: VIBES.

This sexy and artistic show indeed serves up all the vibes, featuring an absolutely STACKED lineup of exciting Latine artists who will be giving the hottest drag and burlesque performances to your favorite high energy Latin music. Due to popular demand, we’ve added a second show date for this production, so VIBRAS is happening Friday, October 6th at 7PM and Sunday, October 8th at 7PM at Momentum Studios (formerly Studio C) in Midtown. This incredible, dynamic all-Latin cast is star-studded across the line. VIBRAS will be hosted by Dela Rosa, with electric performances by burlesque artists Isabella Novela and Sweet Rika, drag artists athena nuff, Ivanna Kischacok, and featuring two very special guests: flying in from Seattle, drag artist Glenn Coco and flying in from Portland, award-winning burlesque artist, Chola Magnolia!

Cash bar on site. This is a 21+ only show, proof of ID required upon entry. We have other all-ages shows on our page, just not this one! Please drink responsibly.

Doors open at 6:45. Don’t miss out!

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Eugene, OR

Come celebrate and explore the diverse and dynamic experiences of the South Asian diaspora through art, comedy, dance, music, spoken word, and more.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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In the spirit of “gathering (n. / v.), To Gather supports and elevates the work of artists who use movement to excavate the rich stories that exist within the Black and Brown dancing body.

To Gather is a celebration of dance artists residing and creating along the West Coast. Over two weekends, guest curators Nia-Amina Minor and David Rue invite choreographers and performers to convene and present new work to the Seattle community. To Gather supports and elevates the work of artists who use movement to excavate the rich stories that exist within the Black and Brown dancing body. In the spirit of “gathering (n. / v.),” this program encourages audiences and artists alike to witness, engage, and commune while supporting new works.

Week 1 features the work of guest choreographer Maurya Kerr (tinypistol) & local Seattle artists, including Akoiya Harris, Symone Sanz, and Cipher Goings + Benjamin Hunter.

Week 2 features the work of guest choreographer Bernard Brown (bbmoves) & local Seattle artists, including Jade Solomon Curtis, Emma Wambui, and Umalalengua Okan + Milvia Berenice Pacheco Salvatierra in collaboration with Naomi Macalalad Bragin.

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yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Trailing of the Sheep Festival
Hailey, ID

Join us for the 27th annual Trailing of the Sheep Festival October 4-8, 2023 to celebrate the history of sheep ranching in Idaho and the West!

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

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Free admission

The St. Nicholas Dancers will be back with periodic performances in the tent

Traditional assortment of hand made Greek pastries at the Coffee Shop and Bakery

Food booths: Gyros, Calamari, Greek Fries, Souvlaki (sausage), Loukomathes

Appetizers: Spanakopita, tiropita, dolmathes served all 3 days from the church kitchen

Dinner entrees served from the kitchen

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This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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TCMoFA is returning to 509 4th ave east for fall arts walk!
This exhibition will feature indigenous artists only, and will be open through the weekend into Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

In honor of Indigenous Peoples’ Day, the Thurston County Museum of Fine Arts is becoming the Coast Salish Museum of Fine Arts
Their Fall Arts Walk exhibition featuring exclusively Indigenous artists will take place on traditional Squaxin, Nisqually, and Cowlitz land in the Salish Sea region of Turtle Island.

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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Northwest African American Museum (NAAM)

Enjoy a reading of “Ayomide and Seyi’s Kitchen: A Kids’ Guide to Plant Based Nutrition from A to Z” written by Margaret Towolawi, MD and illustrated by Anabella Ortiz.

The book is narrated by six year old Ayomide who takes you on a fictional tour of various plant-based foods, including some interesting facts – with his four year old little sister, Seyi, alongside him. This ABC book is a “bite-sized” course on plant-based nutrition while keeping readers engaged through beautiful illustrations.

The Interactive Story Time will go live on our official YouTube channel at 1PM. Ring the bell on our Youtube page to be notified about all upcoming Interactive Story Time releases.

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Come learn the art of Paddle Making with Duane Summers (Duwamish)

Dates: Oct 8th & 22nd
Nov 12th & Nov 19th
Dec 10th & Dec 17th

More information contact: john.romero.sr@unkitawa.org

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ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

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Earshot Jazz Society of Seattle
Seattle , WA

The Earshot Jazz Festival returns this year with performances from both resident and world renowned artists at venues all around Seattle!
Earshot Jazz Festival is back with “Seattle’s most important annual jazz event” (DownBeat), once again presenting today’s brilliant jazz artists over the course of 30 fall days in venues all around the city. In programming across four weeks, they’ve created a series that embodies the history, evolution, and spirit of jazz as it exists around the world as well as right here at home. Noted as, “a festival of adventurous au courant jazz” (JazzTimes), the festival kicks off on October 6 and winds down on November 5. In between are concerts and events by established legends and exciting emerging artists, truly representing today’s most dynamic and diffuse art form.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

Join us at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery for the opening reception of our 4th Annual Dia de los Muertos Art Show.
Opening Reception October 7th 5pm-7pm
Exhibition dates October 7th-November 5th
Gallery Hours Thursday-Sunday 12pm-6pm

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This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Seattle Latino Film Festival
, WA

Seattle Latino Film Festival was founded in 2009 by Jorge Enrique Gonzalez Pacheco, a Cuban international award-winning poet, film industry professional, and cultural entrepreneur. Jorge had a vision to create a film festival in Seattle for Latino artists and filmmakers. The Seattle Latino Film Festival is the only one of its kind in the entire Northwest of the United States. Although the organization operates under budget, the staff are passionate about the films that the festival presents, and are grateful to the film industry for supporting this organization.

The Festival runs during the month of October to coincide with the National Hispanic Heritage Month. SLFF includes international filmmakers, producers, and actors with the specific purpose of engaging the Seattle community with cross-cultural perspectives, and to create a forum to explore those perspectives, many of which are integral to the experience of “Latinidad.”

SLFF is a source of education and entertainment for friends, families and allies. Every October, for ten days, many Hispanic countries appear on movie screens throughout the Seattle Metro area. Festival attendees sample the many distinctive cultural “flavors” uncommon to this side of the world, alleviating the ignorance of who we are.

Our films are diverse and multi-thematic, celebrating our daily experiences including music, literature, dance, and painting through a variety of cinematographic genres.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival has established partnerships with organizations such as the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture, ArtsFund, 4Culture, WA State Arts Commission, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle University, College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington, the Northwest Film Forum, Heritage Bank, King5 News, Univision Seattle, Delta Air Lines & Aeromexico, Microsoft, Seattle Art Museum, Huelva Iberoamerican Film Festival in Spain, Berlin in Germany, Cine Latino de Toulose in France among others. Our Film Festival attracts a politically-aware and diverse demographic. Since its first festival in 2009, we attract over 1000 attendees each year. We have been the recipient a three-year Civic Partner Grant from the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival is an entirely volunteer-run organization. Each person who contributes time to the organization is considered a key player. Our volunteers continue to establish new partnerships.

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Arciniega Street Productions
Anchorage, AK

Arciniega Street is proud to partner with Momentum Studios once again to bring you VIBRAS – the highly anticipated Q3 installment of our quarterly drag, diva and burlesque show: VIBES.

This sexy and artistic show indeed serves up all the vibes, featuring an absolutely STACKED lineup of exciting Latine artists who will be giving the hottest drag and burlesque performances to your favorite high energy Latin music. Due to popular demand, we’ve added a second show date for this production, so VIBRAS is happening Friday, October 6th at 7PM and Sunday, October 8th at 7PM at Momentum Studios (formerly Studio C) in Midtown. This incredible, dynamic all-Latin cast is star-studded across the line. VIBRAS will be hosted by Dela Rosa, with electric performances by burlesque artists Isabella Novela and Sweet Rika, drag artists athena nuff, Ivanna Kischacok, and featuring two very special guests: flying in from Seattle, drag artist Glenn Coco and flying in from Portland, award-winning burlesque artist, Chola Magnolia!

Cash bar on site. This is a 21+ only show, proof of ID required upon entry. We have other all-ages shows on our page, just not this one! Please drink responsibly.

Doors open at 6:45. Don’t miss out!

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Portland Indigenous Marketplace
Portland, OR
Oct 9th is coming up and please remember to bring some cash!! Some vendors only accept cash, most take cards but not all.
First Join us at the PSU Native American Student and Community Center for the
Indigenous Peoples Day Marketplace!!
Find over 30 vendors, music, raffle, art and so much more!!
Time: 10am-3pm
Location: 710 SW Jackson St 97201 in SW Portland, Oregon
Trimet/Blue/Yellow/Green Line and over 20 buses!!
Paid Street Parking and PSU Parking Garages/Lots
Then at a different location
Indigenous Peoples Day Celebration at Barbies Village!
THANK YOU TO @FutureGeneraionsCollaberative and @GreatSpiritChurch for hosting this event (Portland Indigenous Marketplace is organizing the vendors but the rest of the event is put on by these amazing community partners!)
Time: 5pm-8pm
Location: 935 NE 33rd Ave, 97232
Free Street Parking
TriMet #19 and #12
Evening Schedule
4-5pm- Doors Open
5-6pm Dinner/Vendors
6-7pm Children’s Mini Pow Wow/Vendors
7-8pm Guest Speaker Jana Schmieding/Vendors
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TIPI RAISING & HONORING
Mon. Oct. 9th | ISUB Plaza Lawn | 10:00 AM
Join the Native American Student
Association in learning as they demonstrate construction of the traditional tipi, honor special guests, and enjoy the sounds of Vandal Nation Student Drum Group.


Healing, Hope, Education: The Power of Indigenous Resiliency
Mon. Oct. 9th| ISUB Clearwater/ Whitewater Room |5:00-6:00 PM
Keynote Speaker: Arnold Thomas

You’re invited! Join the Native American Student Association in a Tipi Raising & Honoring in the morning and end your day with an inspiring message from honored guest Arnold Thomas.

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

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Cascadia College is hosting an Indigenous People’s Day event in partnership with the City of Bothell and Northshore School District on Monday, October 9th at 11:00 am. The event, open to the public, will be held in the Global Learning and the Arts Building on the Cascadia College-University of Washington Bothell joint campus and will feature Warren KingGeorge, Muckleshoot Tribe historian, as the keynote speaker. There will be various discussion tables to connect and build bridges within the community.

Cascadia recently started an American Indian and Indigenous Studies (AIIS) program, the only such program available to students at a community college. Students can learn through multiple classes about indigenous culture and history and connect it to their other studies.

This year’s focus is on bridging experiences within our communities. “Indigenous People’s Day is an opportunity to reflect upon experiences of native people,” said Dr. Victor Begay, American Indian and Indigenous Studies professor. “These conversations are important and timely as we navigate an inclusive world.”

Cascadia College’s values include diversity, equity and inclusion, as well as sustainability. The Global Learning and the Arts building was the second LEED Platinum building in the state, and the college is certified as the only platinum college in the nation for Green Grounds management.

“Our values of sustainability, equity, and inclusion connect with knowledge and cultural identities across communities,” said Stephan Classen, Assistant Director of Sustainable Practices at Cascadia. “When we can invite our communities to come together, we all grow stronger together.”

Digital image: Solo Song sculpture by Tulalip artist Ty Juvinel depicts a figure, facing skyward, singing, drumming, and crying in the Coast Salish native cultural style which gives voice to the isolation and strong spirit of Native cultures.

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Alaska Public Media
Anchorage, AK
Join us live in person on Indigenous Peoples Day, Monday, October 9, 2023 featuring a program at the Moseley Sports Center on Alaska Pacific University:
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11:00am Doors Open
11:30am Buffet Lunch
12:00pm Program Begins
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With Anchorage School District observing the holiday, please bring your family.
This year’s event is cohosted by Alaska Pacific University, Alaska Native Heritage Center, Alaska Native Professional Association, Alaska Native Sisterhood Camp 87, Alaska’s People, Alaska Public Interest Research Group, Anchorage School District Indigenous Education Program, Anchorage School District Gui Kima Program, Cook Inlet Tribal Council, and Native Village of Eklutna.
You won’t want to miss this event celebrating our vibrant Indigenous histories, cultures and communities. There will also be an appearance from PBS Molly of Denali!
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Free to attend, but donations are accepted to the Shel ch’naq’ahnilu Fund at alaskapacific.edu/donate to support Indigenous student activities & scholarships for the future.
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Parking is limited on campus. There is a free shuttle available from the Alaska Airlines Center. Elder and Media Parking is available directly at Moseley Sports Center.
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Join SO Health-E in honoring and celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day on Mon, Oct 9.

Events will occur in the SOU courtyard and the Student Union Atrium.

Events for children will be held at the ASSOU (Associated Students of Southern Oregon University) Center.

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This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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TCMoFA is returning to 509 4th ave east for fall arts walk!
This exhibition will feature indigenous artists only, and will be open through the weekend into Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

In honor of Indigenous Peoples’ Day, the Thurston County Museum of Fine Arts is becoming the Coast Salish Museum of Fine Arts
Their Fall Arts Walk exhibition featuring exclusively Indigenous artists will take place on traditional Squaxin, Nisqually, and Cowlitz land in the Salish Sea region of Turtle Island.

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

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Friends of Sheldon Jackson Museum
Sitka, AK

On Monday, October 9th, Indigenous People’s Day, at 2-3pm pdt, Sheldon Jackson Museum artist-in-residence Golga Oscar (Yup’ik) will give a talk entitled “Indigenizing the Mind in Western Spaces.”
The talk will be held at the Sheldon Jackson Museum at 104 College Drive and simultaneously on zoom.

Zoom details:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86062826605…
Or visit www.zoom.com and input
Meeting ID: 860 6282 6605
Passcode: GOLGA

Visitors may call the museum at 907-747-8981 to reserve a seat.

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Earshot Jazz Society of Seattle
Seattle , WA

The Earshot Jazz Festival returns this year with performances from both resident and world renowned artists at venues all around Seattle!
Earshot Jazz Festival is back with “Seattle’s most important annual jazz event” (DownBeat), once again presenting today’s brilliant jazz artists over the course of 30 fall days in venues all around the city. In programming across four weeks, they’ve created a series that embodies the history, evolution, and spirit of jazz as it exists around the world as well as right here at home. Noted as, “a festival of adventurous au courant jazz” (JazzTimes), the festival kicks off on October 6 and winds down on November 5. In between are concerts and events by established legends and exciting emerging artists, truly representing today’s most dynamic and diffuse art form.

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Join WSU in celebrating Indigenous Peoples’ Day next week, on Monday, October 9th! Experience the rich history and vibrant culture of the Nimíipuu (Nez Perce) Tribe at special events throughout the day, organized by Native American Programs.
3:00 p.m. – Nimíipuu Tribe Past, Present, & Future, Elson S. Floyd Cultural Center
4:00 p.m. – Nimíipuu WSU Student & Alumni Panel, Elson S. Floyd Cultural Center
3:00-5:00 p.m. – Native Artist & Vendors Popup Shop, Elson S. Floyd Cultural Center
5:00 p.m. – Dinner, Elson S. Floyd Cultural Center (Please RSVP)
7:00 p.m. – According to Coyote Performance, CUB Auditorium
events are free and open to the public, honoring the heritage and contributions of Indigenous communities.

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Future Generations Collaborative
Portland, OR
Indigenous People’s Day is right around the corner and we are so excited to have some amazing events planned for Monday, October 9th. Come to the Marketplace and support our Indigenous vendors then hop over to the NAYA Community Garden. Wrap the day up at Barbie’s Village with dinner, a mini children’s pow-wow, and our amazing guest speaker, @janaunplgd ! Questions? DM us!
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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

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United Indians of All Tribes Foundation (UIATF)
Seattle, WA

Join us for Indigenous Peoples’ Day 2023 at Daybreak Star, hosted by Daybreak Star Radio!

5:00 pm: Bingo

6:00 pm: Dinner

7:00 – 9:00 pm: Jam Session

We encourage you to wear traditional regalia and bring a drum, rattle, flute, etc. for the jam session!

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Children of the Setting Sun Productions
Bellingham, WA

Join us in celebrating Indigenous Peoples’ Day as we learn from and honor the enduring leadership of Indigenous people near and far in caring for our resilient Earth.

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

Join us at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery for the opening reception of our 4th Annual Dia de los Muertos Art Show.
Opening Reception October 7th 5pm-7pm
Exhibition dates October 7th-November 5th
Gallery Hours Thursday-Sunday 12pm-6pm

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This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

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In honor of Indigenous Peoples’ Day, celebrate poetry created and performed by Native poets.

Washington State Poet Laureate Arianne True will begin the event with a reading, followed by an open mic for Indigenous community members to share their poetry. A sign-up sheet will be available at the event and participation by Native poets of all experience levels is encouraged.

At the request of a key event participant, we ask attendees to avoid using strong fragrances.

Can’t make it in person? Watch the livestream on Zoom!

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Seattle Latino Film Festival
, WA

Seattle Latino Film Festival was founded in 2009 by Jorge Enrique Gonzalez Pacheco, a Cuban international award-winning poet, film industry professional, and cultural entrepreneur. Jorge had a vision to create a film festival in Seattle for Latino artists and filmmakers. The Seattle Latino Film Festival is the only one of its kind in the entire Northwest of the United States. Although the organization operates under budget, the staff are passionate about the films that the festival presents, and are grateful to the film industry for supporting this organization.

The Festival runs during the month of October to coincide with the National Hispanic Heritage Month. SLFF includes international filmmakers, producers, and actors with the specific purpose of engaging the Seattle community with cross-cultural perspectives, and to create a forum to explore those perspectives, many of which are integral to the experience of “Latinidad.”

SLFF is a source of education and entertainment for friends, families and allies. Every October, for ten days, many Hispanic countries appear on movie screens throughout the Seattle Metro area. Festival attendees sample the many distinctive cultural “flavors” uncommon to this side of the world, alleviating the ignorance of who we are.

Our films are diverse and multi-thematic, celebrating our daily experiences including music, literature, dance, and painting through a variety of cinematographic genres.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival has established partnerships with organizations such as the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture, ArtsFund, 4Culture, WA State Arts Commission, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle University, College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington, the Northwest Film Forum, Heritage Bank, King5 News, Univision Seattle, Delta Air Lines & Aeromexico, Microsoft, Seattle Art Museum, Huelva Iberoamerican Film Festival in Spain, Berlin in Germany, Cine Latino de Toulose in France among others. Our Film Festival attracts a politically-aware and diverse demographic. Since its first festival in 2009, we attract over 1000 attendees each year. We have been the recipient a three-year Civic Partner Grant from the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival is an entirely volunteer-run organization. Each person who contributes time to the organization is considered a key player. Our volunteers continue to establish new partnerships.

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Indigenous Idaho Alliance
Nampa

Join the Anthropology Club, Inclusive Excellence, and the Schools of Social Sciences & Public Affairs and Arts & Humanities as we honor Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

Free and open to the public! Refreshments will be served.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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Indigenize Productions
Seattle, WA

The Indigenize Productions Indigenous Peoples Day After Party is back baby! (say that 5 times, fast lol)

Come ready to dance, sing and vibe out!
Make some friends, bring some friends, be a friend, just dont watch the tv show Friends!
Bring ur drums, ur rattle, ur regalia, ur sacred ass and let’s stomp on whatshisnames old ugly day together!

Venmo or cash, tix at door.

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yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

View Event

Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

View Event

What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

View Event
Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

View Event

This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

View Event

I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

View Event

An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

View Event
ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

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Earshot Jazz Society of Seattle
Seattle , WA

The Earshot Jazz Festival returns this year with performances from both resident and world renowned artists at venues all around Seattle!
Earshot Jazz Festival is back with “Seattle’s most important annual jazz event” (DownBeat), once again presenting today’s brilliant jazz artists over the course of 30 fall days in venues all around the city. In programming across four weeks, they’ve created a series that embodies the history, evolution, and spirit of jazz as it exists around the world as well as right here at home. Noted as, “a festival of adventurous au courant jazz” (JazzTimes), the festival kicks off on October 6 and winds down on November 5. In between are concerts and events by established legends and exciting emerging artists, truly representing today’s most dynamic and diffuse art form.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

Join us at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery for the opening reception of our 4th Annual Dia de los Muertos Art Show.
Opening Reception October 7th 5pm-7pm
Exhibition dates October 7th-November 5th
Gallery Hours Thursday-Sunday 12pm-6pm

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This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Seattle Latino Film Festival
, WA

Seattle Latino Film Festival was founded in 2009 by Jorge Enrique Gonzalez Pacheco, a Cuban international award-winning poet, film industry professional, and cultural entrepreneur. Jorge had a vision to create a film festival in Seattle for Latino artists and filmmakers. The Seattle Latino Film Festival is the only one of its kind in the entire Northwest of the United States. Although the organization operates under budget, the staff are passionate about the films that the festival presents, and are grateful to the film industry for supporting this organization.

The Festival runs during the month of October to coincide with the National Hispanic Heritage Month. SLFF includes international filmmakers, producers, and actors with the specific purpose of engaging the Seattle community with cross-cultural perspectives, and to create a forum to explore those perspectives, many of which are integral to the experience of “Latinidad.”

SLFF is a source of education and entertainment for friends, families and allies. Every October, for ten days, many Hispanic countries appear on movie screens throughout the Seattle Metro area. Festival attendees sample the many distinctive cultural “flavors” uncommon to this side of the world, alleviating the ignorance of who we are.

Our films are diverse and multi-thematic, celebrating our daily experiences including music, literature, dance, and painting through a variety of cinematographic genres.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival has established partnerships with organizations such as the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture, ArtsFund, 4Culture, WA State Arts Commission, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle University, College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington, the Northwest Film Forum, Heritage Bank, King5 News, Univision Seattle, Delta Air Lines & Aeromexico, Microsoft, Seattle Art Museum, Huelva Iberoamerican Film Festival in Spain, Berlin in Germany, Cine Latino de Toulose in France among others. Our Film Festival attracts a politically-aware and diverse demographic. Since its first festival in 2009, we attract over 1000 attendees each year. We have been the recipient a three-year Civic Partner Grant from the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival is an entirely volunteer-run organization. Each person who contributes time to the organization is considered a key player. Our volunteers continue to establish new partnerships.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

View Event

Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

View Event

What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

View Event

Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

View Event
Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

View Event

This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

View Event
Social Justice Film Festival & Institute
Seattle , WA

The Social Justice Film Festival serves as a dynamic forum where art and social justice intersect to build community beyond borders and lift-up voices, issues, and stories of public importance.

As one of the few film organizations exclusively focused on social justice, they feature a diversity of mostly independent films and programs that promote civic engagement. They welcome first-time and aspiring filmmakers, especially from underrepresented communities, in addition to more established social justice filmmakers.

In-Person October 11-15, 2023
Streaming Online October 16-22, 2023

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

View Event

An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

View Event
ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

View Event
Earshot Jazz Society of Seattle
Seattle , WA

The Earshot Jazz Festival returns this year with performances from both resident and world renowned artists at venues all around Seattle!
Earshot Jazz Festival is back with “Seattle’s most important annual jazz event” (DownBeat), once again presenting today’s brilliant jazz artists over the course of 30 fall days in venues all around the city. In programming across four weeks, they’ve created a series that embodies the history, evolution, and spirit of jazz as it exists around the world as well as right here at home. Noted as, “a festival of adventurous au courant jazz” (JazzTimes), the festival kicks off on October 6 and winds down on November 5. In between are concerts and events by established legends and exciting emerging artists, truly representing today’s most dynamic and diffuse art form.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

Join us at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery for the opening reception of our 4th Annual Dia de los Muertos Art Show.
Opening Reception October 7th 5pm-7pm
Exhibition dates October 7th-November 5th
Gallery Hours Thursday-Sunday 12pm-6pm

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This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Anxestral Gallery
Seattle, WA

Arts & the City, MEXAM NW Festival and the Consulate of Mexico in Seattle invite you to a magical night of live music, art and community where you can enjoy and sing the best-known boleros in the voice of our guest artist.

The event will take place at Anxestral Gallery, where you will also be able to see the “Contemporary Mexico” art exhibition, with incredible pieces by some of the artists that are transforming the art scene in Mexico.

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Seattle Latino Film Festival
, WA

Seattle Latino Film Festival was founded in 2009 by Jorge Enrique Gonzalez Pacheco, a Cuban international award-winning poet, film industry professional, and cultural entrepreneur. Jorge had a vision to create a film festival in Seattle for Latino artists and filmmakers. The Seattle Latino Film Festival is the only one of its kind in the entire Northwest of the United States. Although the organization operates under budget, the staff are passionate about the films that the festival presents, and are grateful to the film industry for supporting this organization.

The Festival runs during the month of October to coincide with the National Hispanic Heritage Month. SLFF includes international filmmakers, producers, and actors with the specific purpose of engaging the Seattle community with cross-cultural perspectives, and to create a forum to explore those perspectives, many of which are integral to the experience of “Latinidad.”

SLFF is a source of education and entertainment for friends, families and allies. Every October, for ten days, many Hispanic countries appear on movie screens throughout the Seattle Metro area. Festival attendees sample the many distinctive cultural “flavors” uncommon to this side of the world, alleviating the ignorance of who we are.

Our films are diverse and multi-thematic, celebrating our daily experiences including music, literature, dance, and painting through a variety of cinematographic genres.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival has established partnerships with organizations such as the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture, ArtsFund, 4Culture, WA State Arts Commission, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle University, College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington, the Northwest Film Forum, Heritage Bank, King5 News, Univision Seattle, Delta Air Lines & Aeromexico, Microsoft, Seattle Art Museum, Huelva Iberoamerican Film Festival in Spain, Berlin in Germany, Cine Latino de Toulose in France among others. Our Film Festival attracts a politically-aware and diverse demographic. Since its first festival in 2009, we attract over 1000 attendees each year. We have been the recipient a three-year Civic Partner Grant from the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival is an entirely volunteer-run organization. Each person who contributes time to the organization is considered a key player. Our volunteers continue to establish new partnerships.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

View Event
Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

View Event

Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

View Event

What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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After years of relentless dedication and hard work, Tasveer is ecstatic to stand proudly beside a festival that has not just transcended boundaries but shattered them entirely. This year, Tasveer has etched its name in history as the first-ever Oscar-qualifying film festival within the South Asian realm.

This prestigious recognition from the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences is a culmination of our tireless efforts and unwavering commitment to the South Asian dream. It signifies a monumental shift in the landscape of South Asian cinema, streamlining the path for deserving films. Winning at Tasveer now opens a direct gateway for these films to enter the esteemed Oscar race, eliminating the need for intermediaries and allowing authentic South Asian narratives to shine unfiltered and unmediated.

No longer confined to the limitations of a handful of film festivals like Sundance, Tribeca, or Cannes, which often restrict the visibility and screening opportunities for South Asian films, this recognition empowers our cinema to compete on the grandest stage.

Oct 12th-15th: In theaters in Seattle
Oct 16th-22nd: Virtual on TasveerTV

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

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This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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Social Justice Film Festival & Institute
Seattle , WA

The Social Justice Film Festival serves as a dynamic forum where art and social justice intersect to build community beyond borders and lift-up voices, issues, and stories of public importance.

As one of the few film organizations exclusively focused on social justice, they feature a diversity of mostly independent films and programs that promote civic engagement. They welcome first-time and aspiring filmmakers, especially from underrepresented communities, in addition to more established social justice filmmakers.

In-Person October 11-15, 2023
Streaming Online October 16-22, 2023

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

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Earshot Jazz Society of Seattle
Seattle , WA

The Earshot Jazz Festival returns this year with performances from both resident and world renowned artists at venues all around Seattle!
Earshot Jazz Festival is back with “Seattle’s most important annual jazz event” (DownBeat), once again presenting today’s brilliant jazz artists over the course of 30 fall days in venues all around the city. In programming across four weeks, they’ve created a series that embodies the history, evolution, and spirit of jazz as it exists around the world as well as right here at home. Noted as, “a festival of adventurous au courant jazz” (JazzTimes), the festival kicks off on October 6 and winds down on November 5. In between are concerts and events by established legends and exciting emerging artists, truly representing today’s most dynamic and diffuse art form.

View Event
Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

View Event

The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

Join us at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery for the opening reception of our 4th Annual Dia de los Muertos Art Show.
Opening Reception October 7th 5pm-7pm
Exhibition dates October 7th-November 5th
Gallery Hours Thursday-Sunday 12pm-6pm

View Event

This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

View Event
Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

View Event
Seattle Latino Film Festival
, WA

Seattle Latino Film Festival was founded in 2009 by Jorge Enrique Gonzalez Pacheco, a Cuban international award-winning poet, film industry professional, and cultural entrepreneur. Jorge had a vision to create a film festival in Seattle for Latino artists and filmmakers. The Seattle Latino Film Festival is the only one of its kind in the entire Northwest of the United States. Although the organization operates under budget, the staff are passionate about the films that the festival presents, and are grateful to the film industry for supporting this organization.

The Festival runs during the month of October to coincide with the National Hispanic Heritage Month. SLFF includes international filmmakers, producers, and actors with the specific purpose of engaging the Seattle community with cross-cultural perspectives, and to create a forum to explore those perspectives, many of which are integral to the experience of “Latinidad.”

SLFF is a source of education and entertainment for friends, families and allies. Every October, for ten days, many Hispanic countries appear on movie screens throughout the Seattle Metro area. Festival attendees sample the many distinctive cultural “flavors” uncommon to this side of the world, alleviating the ignorance of who we are.

Our films are diverse and multi-thematic, celebrating our daily experiences including music, literature, dance, and painting through a variety of cinematographic genres.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival has established partnerships with organizations such as the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture, ArtsFund, 4Culture, WA State Arts Commission, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle University, College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington, the Northwest Film Forum, Heritage Bank, King5 News, Univision Seattle, Delta Air Lines & Aeromexico, Microsoft, Seattle Art Museum, Huelva Iberoamerican Film Festival in Spain, Berlin in Germany, Cine Latino de Toulose in France among others. Our Film Festival attracts a politically-aware and diverse demographic. Since its first festival in 2009, we attract over 1000 attendees each year. We have been the recipient a three-year Civic Partner Grant from the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival is an entirely volunteer-run organization. Each person who contributes time to the organization is considered a key player. Our volunteers continue to establish new partnerships.

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The Northwest Orchestra and MEXAM NW Festival invite you to this classical and chamber music concert that will take place at the First Congregational Church.

View Event
Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

View Event
Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

View Event
Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

View Event

Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

View Event

What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Maude Kerns Art Center
Eugene, OR

The Maude Kerns Art Center celebrates the 30th annual Día de los Muertos Exhibit in 2023 with artwork, community altars, and a special Day of the Dead Gift Shop. The exhibit opens October 13th and runs through November 3rd.

The Mexican Day of the Dead celebration acknowledges the link between the communities of the living and the dead. The holiday blends the ancient harvest rituals of the Aztec god of death and the Roman Catholic holidays of All Souls and All Saints days. On November 1 and 2, the dead are thought to return to partake in the activities of the living. Holiday activities include the creation of altars that welcome deceased loved ones.

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After years of relentless dedication and hard work, Tasveer is ecstatic to stand proudly beside a festival that has not just transcended boundaries but shattered them entirely. This year, Tasveer has etched its name in history as the first-ever Oscar-qualifying film festival within the South Asian realm.

This prestigious recognition from the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences is a culmination of our tireless efforts and unwavering commitment to the South Asian dream. It signifies a monumental shift in the landscape of South Asian cinema, streamlining the path for deserving films. Winning at Tasveer now opens a direct gateway for these films to enter the esteemed Oscar race, eliminating the need for intermediaries and allowing authentic South Asian narratives to shine unfiltered and unmediated.

No longer confined to the limitations of a handful of film festivals like Sundance, Tribeca, or Cannes, which often restrict the visibility and screening opportunities for South Asian films, this recognition empowers our cinema to compete on the grandest stage.

Oct 12th-15th: In theaters in Seattle
Oct 16th-22nd: Virtual on TasveerTV

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

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This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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Social Justice Film Festival & Institute
Seattle , WA

The Social Justice Film Festival serves as a dynamic forum where art and social justice intersect to build community beyond borders and lift-up voices, issues, and stories of public importance.

As one of the few film organizations exclusively focused on social justice, they feature a diversity of mostly independent films and programs that promote civic engagement. They welcome first-time and aspiring filmmakers, especially from underrepresented communities, in addition to more established social justice filmmakers.

In-Person October 11-15, 2023
Streaming Online October 16-22, 2023

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

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Seattle Polish Film Festival
Seattle, WA

Seattle Polish Film Festival (SPFF) is an annual event showcasing the best of Polish cinema since the early 1990s. The SPFF is produced and presented by the Seattle-Gdynia Sister City Association.

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Earshot Jazz Society of Seattle
Seattle , WA

The Earshot Jazz Festival returns this year with performances from both resident and world renowned artists at venues all around Seattle!
Earshot Jazz Festival is back with “Seattle’s most important annual jazz event” (DownBeat), once again presenting today’s brilliant jazz artists over the course of 30 fall days in venues all around the city. In programming across four weeks, they’ve created a series that embodies the history, evolution, and spirit of jazz as it exists around the world as well as right here at home. Noted as, “a festival of adventurous au courant jazz” (JazzTimes), the festival kicks off on October 6 and winds down on November 5. In between are concerts and events by established legends and exciting emerging artists, truly representing today’s most dynamic and diffuse art form.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

Join us at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery for the opening reception of our 4th Annual Dia de los Muertos Art Show.
Opening Reception October 7th 5pm-7pm
Exhibition dates October 7th-November 5th
Gallery Hours Thursday-Sunday 12pm-6pm

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This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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PODER of Idaho is excited to announce the Inaugural Hispanic Heritage Month Gala, which will be held Friday, October 13th at the Hispanic Cultural Center in Nampa, ID. This highly anticipated event serves as a platform for PODER of Idaho to fundraise, celebrate, and showcase their important work and programs, such as the Latinos Unidos Conference, Idaho Latino Vote, Sana Hermana Program, Sigue Sonando: DACA Renewal Fund, and Manejando Sin Miedo. They defend and support Latino, undocumented, migrant and DACA communities throughout Idaho through actions, events, and various campaigns on immigration, economic justice, education, and gender equity.

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Diwali, also known as the Festival of Lights, is one of the most important festivals of the year in India, celebrating the victory of good over evil and light over darkness. It tops all other festivals with its long-lasting and multi-faith celebrations in India.
The importance of Diwali for Indians is like Christmas’s for Westerners.

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Seattle Latino Film Festival
, WA

Seattle Latino Film Festival was founded in 2009 by Jorge Enrique Gonzalez Pacheco, a Cuban international award-winning poet, film industry professional, and cultural entrepreneur. Jorge had a vision to create a film festival in Seattle for Latino artists and filmmakers. The Seattle Latino Film Festival is the only one of its kind in the entire Northwest of the United States. Although the organization operates under budget, the staff are passionate about the films that the festival presents, and are grateful to the film industry for supporting this organization.

The Festival runs during the month of October to coincide with the National Hispanic Heritage Month. SLFF includes international filmmakers, producers, and actors with the specific purpose of engaging the Seattle community with cross-cultural perspectives, and to create a forum to explore those perspectives, many of which are integral to the experience of “Latinidad.”

SLFF is a source of education and entertainment for friends, families and allies. Every October, for ten days, many Hispanic countries appear on movie screens throughout the Seattle Metro area. Festival attendees sample the many distinctive cultural “flavors” uncommon to this side of the world, alleviating the ignorance of who we are.

Our films are diverse and multi-thematic, celebrating our daily experiences including music, literature, dance, and painting through a variety of cinematographic genres.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival has established partnerships with organizations such as the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture, ArtsFund, 4Culture, WA State Arts Commission, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle University, College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington, the Northwest Film Forum, Heritage Bank, King5 News, Univision Seattle, Delta Air Lines & Aeromexico, Microsoft, Seattle Art Museum, Huelva Iberoamerican Film Festival in Spain, Berlin in Germany, Cine Latino de Toulose in France among others. Our Film Festival attracts a politically-aware and diverse demographic. Since its first festival in 2009, we attract over 1000 attendees each year. We have been the recipient a three-year Civic Partner Grant from the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival is an entirely volunteer-run organization. Each person who contributes time to the organization is considered a key player. Our volunteers continue to establish new partnerships.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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Portland, OR

Every fall, the dead are commemorated in Portland’s longest-running Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead) celebration. This year, Milagro observes their 28th Día de Muertos with an original production, Las Adelitas. Las Adelitas will be infused with folkloric dance and music, accompanied by theatrical elements that celebrate the ancestors through the building of altars and the sharing of cultural traditions. Workshops will share altar building crafts such as sugar skulls and paper flowers for decorating home altars.

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yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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Seattle Indian Health Board
Seattle, WA

Seattle Indian Health Board October 14 at Daybreak Star Cultural Center for the 27th Annual Spirit Walk & Warrior Run—an opportunity to gather and support our thriving cultures and healthy Native communities!

You can participate in a 5K trail run or a free, accessible 2K walk, followed by food, entertainment, and an Indigenous vendors’ market for the whole family.

Proceeds from the Spirit Walk & Warrior Run will fund projects that increase access to culturally attuned care. When you support our work, you help ensure that Native people continue to thrive on Native land in the Seattle area.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Maude Kerns Art Center
Eugene, OR

The Maude Kerns Art Center celebrates the 30th annual Día de los Muertos Exhibit in 2023 with artwork, community altars, and a special Day of the Dead Gift Shop. The exhibit opens October 13th and runs through November 3rd.

The Mexican Day of the Dead celebration acknowledges the link between the communities of the living and the dead. The holiday blends the ancient harvest rituals of the Aztec god of death and the Roman Catholic holidays of All Souls and All Saints days. On November 1 and 2, the dead are thought to return to partake in the activities of the living. Holiday activities include the creation of altars that welcome deceased loved ones.

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After years of relentless dedication and hard work, Tasveer is ecstatic to stand proudly beside a festival that has not just transcended boundaries but shattered them entirely. This year, Tasveer has etched its name in history as the first-ever Oscar-qualifying film festival within the South Asian realm.

This prestigious recognition from the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences is a culmination of our tireless efforts and unwavering commitment to the South Asian dream. It signifies a monumental shift in the landscape of South Asian cinema, streamlining the path for deserving films. Winning at Tasveer now opens a direct gateway for these films to enter the esteemed Oscar race, eliminating the need for intermediaries and allowing authentic South Asian narratives to shine unfiltered and unmediated.

No longer confined to the limitations of a handful of film festivals like Sundance, Tribeca, or Cannes, which often restrict the visibility and screening opportunities for South Asian films, this recognition empowers our cinema to compete on the grandest stage.

Oct 12th-15th: In theaters in Seattle
Oct 16th-22nd: Virtual on TasveerTV

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Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Share your memories and help preserve the past! Bring your photographs, letters, small objects, and printed materials to have them scanned for a public digital archive about Black Spokane.
We encourage you to share items that represent your life or your family’s lives in the Black community, whether very recently or long ago.
Your items will be scanned and immediately returned to you along with a copy of the digital files. You’ll also have the option to create an audio recording sharing the story behind your items.

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

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TurkFest
Seattle, WA

Come celebrate Turkish Republic’s 100th year with us at Seattle Center Armory.
Would you like to make Turkish coffee? Help our performers or just help the festival out? We have lots of volunteering opportunities:
https://www.signupgenius.com/go/4090B4DA8A62CA0F85-turkfest#/

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This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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Social Justice Film Festival & Institute
Seattle , WA

The Social Justice Film Festival serves as a dynamic forum where art and social justice intersect to build community beyond borders and lift-up voices, issues, and stories of public importance.

As one of the few film organizations exclusively focused on social justice, they feature a diversity of mostly independent films and programs that promote civic engagement. They welcome first-time and aspiring filmmakers, especially from underrepresented communities, in addition to more established social justice filmmakers.

In-Person October 11-15, 2023
Streaming Online October 16-22, 2023

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Black Panther Party’s Legacy Walking Tour of Albina
led by Mr. Kent Ford, co-founder of Portland’s chapter of the ’60s-era black empowerment organization.
Listen to his memories of revolutionary activism and community service, and be inspired for today’s fight for social change.

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MEXAM Northwest Festival
Seattle, WA

Join the Seattle Symphony to celebrate Día de los Muertos! Featuring vibrant Mexican music and composers, enjoy a fun-filled family event with dazzling guest artists, decorated ofrendas and colorful festivities.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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Unkitawa
Kent, WA

Unkitawa is having a 3 hr information session on Pow Wow etiquette, protocol and dance style/regalia discussion with Arlie, Jessie, Ryan and Serene.

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Latinx Unidos of the South Sound (LUSS)
Tacoma, WA

Tacoma Arts Live, in partnership with Latinx Unidos del South Sound (LUSS), is pleased to announce the seventh annual Festival Latinx on Saturday, October 14 from 12:00-5:00 p.m. at Tacoma Armory (1001 S Yakima in Tacoma). Festival Latinx is a celebration of the Latinx communities of the South Sound with music, dance, art, crafts, and more. This event is FREE to attend. This year’s theme is Alegría (Happiness).

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Tacoma Arts Live
Tacoma, WA

Attendees will experience live performances that reflect the diversity of Latinx communities, with musical acts including festival favorite Mariachi Guadalajara de Seattle kicking off the festival at noon. Dance performances feature lively choreography and colorful costumes. Bailadores de Bronce – the Northwest’s premiere Mexican ballet folklórico company – will open the dance stage, followed by students in Tacoma Arts Live’s school-based folklórico program in East Tacoma, and Costa Rican group Caña Dulce. Afro-Puerto Rican ensemble, Hijos de Agüeybaná, under the direction of drum master Otoqui Reyes will present the powerful tradition of bomba drum and dance, followed by Argentine vocalist and bandoneon player Mirta Wymerszberg’s program of tango dance and live music with Sol de Noche. Huehca Omeyocan will close out the mainstage with the inspiring traditions of Mexica (Aztec) music and dance, adorned in captivating regalia.

Celebrated Tacoma visual artist Gerardo Peña Aka Periko will create debut an original mural where festival attendees can contribute their own stories of what brings them Alegría (Happiness). Surrounding the mural will be a hands-on arts and craft zone serving children and creators of all ages. LUSS and Calavera Collective will host traditional craft activities with additional children’s activities from the Tacoma Public Library, the Children’s Museum of Tacoma, and Symphony Tacoma.

A mercadito – or little market – will feature dozens of Latinx visual artists and vendors offering handmade jewelry, imported and local handcrafts, bilingual books, and small-batch creations. Additionally, various nonprofit and advocacy organizations serving the Latinx and broader communities will be on hand with information and resources. The festival will continue its longtime commitment to community health by partnering with the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department, Molina Healthcare, and other services. Finally, the event will also feature local Latinx food and drink vendors such as Lopez Cocinita LAB and Komadre Kombucha, serving Mexican and Caribbean inspired flavors.

With five hours of free music, dance, art, crafts, food and hands on activities, Festival Latinx welcomes community members of all ages to explore the rich tapestry of diverse Latin American heritage that is reflected in the Latinx communities of our region!

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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While exploring the cultural significance and life-cycle of salmon, Sarah’s workshop will relate art to connection with place, honoring this connection, and the land that we are. She will share her perspective on Climate Justice as an indigenous person and member of the Cowlitz Tribe. She will facilitate a salmon painting workshop and the importance of respecting native artwork.

This is the finale of the 3-part workshop series presented, by Thurston Climate Action Team, exploring how art can bring about positive changes in ourselves, our communities, and beyond. Through meditation, ritual, art, and deep listening, we will envision futures where we all can thrive, make art, and support one another in developing our own art for change.

We will explore the question: How can we, as Artists and Change Makers, spark and sustain a creative revolution in Thurston County to create a future where we all can thrive?

Join them for a deep dive into the power of art. We’ll explore the transformative power of art, make art together, and support one another in developing our own art for change.

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ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

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Seattle Polish Film Festival
Seattle, WA

Seattle Polish Film Festival (SPFF) is an annual event showcasing the best of Polish cinema since the early 1990s. The SPFF is produced and presented by the Seattle-Gdynia Sister City Association.

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Earshot Jazz Society of Seattle
Seattle , WA

The Earshot Jazz Festival returns this year with performances from both resident and world renowned artists at venues all around Seattle!
Earshot Jazz Festival is back with “Seattle’s most important annual jazz event” (DownBeat), once again presenting today’s brilliant jazz artists over the course of 30 fall days in venues all around the city. In programming across four weeks, they’ve created a series that embodies the history, evolution, and spirit of jazz as it exists around the world as well as right here at home. Noted as, “a festival of adventurous au courant jazz” (JazzTimes), the festival kicks off on October 6 and winds down on November 5. In between are concerts and events by established legends and exciting emerging artists, truly representing today’s most dynamic and diffuse art form.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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Eastside Native American Education Program (ENAEP)
Kirkland, WA

ENAEP’s Annual Pow-Wow to honor our wonderful Veterans. Host drum: 206!

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The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

Join us at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery for the opening reception of our 4th Annual Dia de los Muertos Art Show.
Opening Reception October 7th 5pm-7pm
Exhibition dates October 7th-November 5th
Gallery Hours Thursday-Sunday 12pm-6pm

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Join Latinos en Spokane to continue celebrating Latino and Hispanic Heritage Month in Spokane with an electrifying evening of Lucha Libre on October 14th , 5pm at the West Central Community Center!

Event Highlights:


  • 5 rounds of heart-pounding Lucha Libre action!
  • Featuring 20 professional Luchadores from Lucha Volcanica!
  • ALL AGES & family friendly!
  • Experience the rich cultural tradition of Lucha Libre, dating back to ancient Aztec and Maya sports.
  • This event marks a historic moment for Spokane as it hosts its very first Lucha Libre Night, bringing this vibrant tradition to our community.
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Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR)
Redmond, WA

Join CAIR Washington for an evening with two of the most renowned students of knowledge the ummah has to offer. Shaykh Hasib Noor and Ustadh Ubaydullah Evans will be in town for one evening only to speak at the CAIR-WA banquet, where we can benefit from their expertise and knowledge.

The banquet will be hosted by Zahra Billoo, the Executive Director of CAIR-SFBA and a civil rights advocate. CAIR Washington is presenting a Community Service Award to Dr. Ahsen Nadeem, beloved outgoing MAPS Youth Director, and will hear from special guest Imam Farid Sulayman, whose story of travel delays and watchlist issues was recently featured on the front page of the Sunday Seattle Times. This packed program is one that you won’t want to miss.

This year’s theme is “Unity in the Pursuit of Justice”. No matter what, our communities come together to uphold the civil rights of our brothers and sisters, and to pursue justice for those who need it. Most recently, our community came together at a crucial moment to help fund an Afghan brother’s travel costs in order to make a vital asylum interview.

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El Centro de la Raza
Seattle, WA

Join El Centro de la Raza on Saturday, October 14, 2023 for their annual Building the Beloved Community Gala and take part in an exciting event that raises funds for 43 programs and services that benefit more than 20,000 individuals and families across our region. The evening will include live music, a reception, silent and live auctions, a three-course meal, and the presentation of our Roberto Maestas Legacy Awards and Scholarships!

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This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Spokane, WA

Diwali, also known as the Festival of Lights, is one of the most important festivals of the year in India, celebrating the victory of good over evil and light over darkness. It tops all other festivals with its long-lasting and multi-faith celebrations in India.
The importance of Diwali for Indians is like Christmas’s for Westerners.

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Seattle Latino Film Festival
, WA

Seattle Latino Film Festival was founded in 2009 by Jorge Enrique Gonzalez Pacheco, a Cuban international award-winning poet, film industry professional, and cultural entrepreneur. Jorge had a vision to create a film festival in Seattle for Latino artists and filmmakers. The Seattle Latino Film Festival is the only one of its kind in the entire Northwest of the United States. Although the organization operates under budget, the staff are passionate about the films that the festival presents, and are grateful to the film industry for supporting this organization.

The Festival runs during the month of October to coincide with the National Hispanic Heritage Month. SLFF includes international filmmakers, producers, and actors with the specific purpose of engaging the Seattle community with cross-cultural perspectives, and to create a forum to explore those perspectives, many of which are integral to the experience of “Latinidad.”

SLFF is a source of education and entertainment for friends, families and allies. Every October, for ten days, many Hispanic countries appear on movie screens throughout the Seattle Metro area. Festival attendees sample the many distinctive cultural “flavors” uncommon to this side of the world, alleviating the ignorance of who we are.

Our films are diverse and multi-thematic, celebrating our daily experiences including music, literature, dance, and painting through a variety of cinematographic genres.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival has established partnerships with organizations such as the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture, ArtsFund, 4Culture, WA State Arts Commission, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle University, College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington, the Northwest Film Forum, Heritage Bank, King5 News, Univision Seattle, Delta Air Lines & Aeromexico, Microsoft, Seattle Art Museum, Huelva Iberoamerican Film Festival in Spain, Berlin in Germany, Cine Latino de Toulose in France among others. Our Film Festival attracts a politically-aware and diverse demographic. Since its first festival in 2009, we attract over 1000 attendees each year. We have been the recipient a three-year Civic Partner Grant from the City of Seattle Office and Art and Culture.

The Seattle Latino Film Festival is an entirely volunteer-run organization. Each person who contributes time to the organization is considered a key player. Our volunteers continue to establish new partnerships.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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Portland, OR

Every fall, the dead are commemorated in Portland’s longest-running Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead) celebration. This year, Milagro observes their 28th Día de Muertos with an original production, Las Adelitas. Las Adelitas will be infused with folkloric dance and music, accompanied by theatrical elements that celebrate the ancestors through the building of altars and the sharing of cultural traditions. Workshops will share altar building crafts such as sugar skulls and paper flowers for decorating home altars.

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yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement (STALM)
Snoqualmie, WA

Join the Seattle Running Collective and the Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Movement for a mindful hike at Snoqualmie Falls, a sacred site to the Snoqualmie People.

The Ancestral Lands Movement seeks to spread awareness of the Snoqualmie people who have lived in the southern Salish Sea region since time immemorial and share the significance of these lands and provide information on how people can help the Tribe in respecting, restoring, and protecting these lands.

This hike will allow us to all move together and reflect on our impact on the lands and how each of us can become better stewards for future generations. This is a family-friendly event.

The hike is about 1.4 miles roundtrip. While the hike itself is not ADA accessible, there are viewing areas that are ADA accessible.

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Explore the beauty and history of weaving and beading in our Pacific Islander cultures!

Weaving and Beading are an integral part of the lives of many Pacific Islander communities, connecting our culture, history, and identity to each other and the land. Join UTOPIA PDX as they explore the cultural significance of weaving Lauhala and beading Osous (Carolinian Beading Art).

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Maude Kerns Art Center
Eugene, OR

The Maude Kerns Art Center celebrates the 30th annual Día de los Muertos Exhibit in 2023 with artwork, community altars, and a special Day of the Dead Gift Shop. The exhibit opens October 13th and runs through November 3rd.

The Mexican Day of the Dead celebration acknowledges the link between the communities of the living and the dead. The holiday blends the ancient harvest rituals of the Aztec god of death and the Roman Catholic holidays of All Souls and All Saints days. On November 1 and 2, the dead are thought to return to partake in the activities of the living. Holiday activities include the creation of altars that welcome deceased loved ones.

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After years of relentless dedication and hard work, Tasveer is ecstatic to stand proudly beside a festival that has not just transcended boundaries but shattered them entirely. This year, Tasveer has etched its name in history as the first-ever Oscar-qualifying film festival within the South Asian realm.

This prestigious recognition from the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences is a culmination of our tireless efforts and unwavering commitment to the South Asian dream. It signifies a monumental shift in the landscape of South Asian cinema, streamlining the path for deserving films. Winning at Tasveer now opens a direct gateway for these films to enter the esteemed Oscar race, eliminating the need for intermediaries and allowing authentic South Asian narratives to shine unfiltered and unmediated.

No longer confined to the limitations of a handful of film festivals like Sundance, Tribeca, or Cannes, which often restrict the visibility and screening opportunities for South Asian films, this recognition empowers our cinema to compete on the grandest stage.

Oct 12th-15th: In theaters in Seattle
Oct 16th-22nd: Virtual on TasveerTV

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Check one, two, three 🎤 “Sound Check! The Music We Make”, is a new exhibit at Wing Luke Museum on view from Sunday October 15, 2023 until September 14, 2024 🎧🎶💿🎹

Sound Check! celebrates the role of music in the lives of AANHPI communities. Dive into community-based stories as well as the experiences of AANHPI professionals in the music industry. Audiophiles and historians will be able to browse archival materials, photos, and artworks while also indulging in interactive audio-visual installations.

Featured artists include Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto of Soundgarden; singer-songwriter Carly Ann Calbero; jazz drummer Akira Tana; musician Roger Rigor; hip hop artist Geo Quibuyen of Blue Scholars and many more.


Don’t forget about the perks of becoming a Museum Member like unlimited free general admission and opportunities to see exhibits first at special Museum Member Receptions!

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

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TurkFest
Seattle, WA

Come celebrate Turkish Republic’s 100th year with us at Seattle Center Armory.
Would you like to make Turkish coffee? Help our performers or just help the festival out? We have lots of volunteering opportunities:
https://www.signupgenius.com/go/4090B4DA8A62CA0F85-turkfest#/

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This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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Social Justice Film Festival & Institute
Seattle , WA

The Social Justice Film Festival serves as a dynamic forum where art and social justice intersect to build community beyond borders and lift-up voices, issues, and stories of public importance.

As one of the few film organizations exclusively focused on social justice, they feature a diversity of mostly independent films and programs that promote civic engagement. They welcome first-time and aspiring filmmakers, especially from underrepresented communities, in addition to more established social justice filmmakers.

In-Person October 11-15, 2023
Streaming Online October 16-22, 2023

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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MEXAM Northwest Festival
Renton, WA

Join the Seattle Aquarium and MEXAM NW Festival for a walking tour along the Cedar River.

A guided tour by environmental conservation experts to see the spawning salmon and learn about these amazing animals, an excellent opportunity to take a nature walk with nature conservation specialists and learn more about the epic journey salmon take from the ocean to the Cedar River to reproduce, learn why these amazing fish are so important to the environmental health of the Pacific Northwest, and discover how we can help these special creatures return to the Cedar River.

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Bellevue, WA

Come visit Gigi at the Diwali Expo on Oct 15, 2023! ENTRY IS FREE! The expo will be showcasing the finest jewelry, Indian Pakistani clothing, men’s wear, kids wear, sarees, lehngas, jutti’s, clutches, stoles and so much more! Can’t wait to see you then!

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

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Seattle Polish Film Festival
Seattle, WA

Seattle Polish Film Festival (SPFF) is an annual event showcasing the best of Polish cinema since the early 1990s. The SPFF is produced and presented by the Seattle-Gdynia Sister City Association.

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About the Webinar: It is clear through the expectation of sleep deprived parenthood that our communities have become unwelcoming to the rhythm of the newborn. We are told not to expect any sleep during the newborn stage while also being told that rest is a crucial part of postpartum healing and infant development. In this webinar we will discuss the rhythm of newborn sleep and how to safely adapt to this rhythm in a way that will set the foundation for a familial routine around rest.

About Jazzy: Jazzy Bryant is a mixed Black and Indigenous nonbinary birth worker who is passionate about radical care and reproductive justice as a liberatory and community led framework. Like many intuitive caregivers, Jazzy has always been called to care for those around them, especially the youngins and parenting folk in their life. Early on they discovered the power of nourishing bonds and openhearted support in building resilience and self determination that can last many lifetimes. On their own healing journey, Jazzy discovered the importance of birth and postpartum care in improving perinatal outcomes within their communities as well as a way of remembering Black and Indigenous knowledges around childrearing. Jazzy honors and channels their ancestors as they continue to remember and decolonize their authentic ways of being.

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Earshot Jazz Society of Seattle
Seattle , WA

The Earshot Jazz Festival returns this year with performances from both resident and world renowned artists at venues all around Seattle!
Earshot Jazz Festival is back with “Seattle’s most important annual jazz event” (DownBeat), once again presenting today’s brilliant jazz artists over the course of 30 fall days in venues all around the city. In programming across four weeks, they’ve created a series that embodies the history, evolution, and spirit of jazz as it exists around the world as well as right here at home. Noted as, “a festival of adventurous au courant jazz” (JazzTimes), the festival kicks off on October 6 and winds down on November 5. In between are concerts and events by established legends and exciting emerging artists, truly representing today’s most dynamic and diffuse art form.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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The Halluci Nation is hitting the road again this fall!!
Tag your crew and tell them what city they’ll get to see your beautiful faces at!!

Check the more info link for details regarding concert locations, times, and tickets.

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

Join us at the Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery for the opening reception of our 4th Annual Dia de los Muertos Art Show.
Opening Reception October 7th 5pm-7pm
Exhibition dates October 7th-November 5th
Gallery Hours Thursday-Sunday 12pm-6pm

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This course, open to the public, will introduce Chinese medical theories, treatments, history, the basics of holism, and research.

Participants will learn about acupoints, herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, gua sha, cupping, and bleeding. Dietary therapy, channel system, organ networks, along with yin/yang theory, Chinese pathology, and concepts of qi will be explored as well. This five-week online class is presented by esteemed OCOM faculty members, all teaching their specialized perspectives via lecture, demonstration, and discussion.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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After holding over 75 authentic African dinners since 2016 with chefs for each dinner coming from over 40 countries across Africa and the diaspora, we have attracted over 5,000 attendees who have literally turned into a family.

One Vibe African Dinner Experiences were first held at Cafe Avole in 2016 where they were known as “Avole Night” and have since then been held at Rumba Notes, Kezira Cafe, and Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute where the dinner series is returning as “Taste of Madaraka Festival” on Sunday September 17th.

We will galvanize our community around sumptuous meals every third Sunday of the month until March 2024.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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Portland, OR

Every fall, the dead are commemorated in Portland’s longest-running Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead) celebration. This year, Milagro observes their 28th Día de Muertos with an original production, Las Adelitas. Las Adelitas will be infused with folkloric dance and music, accompanied by theatrical elements that celebrate the ancestors through the building of altars and the sharing of cultural traditions. Workshops will share altar building crafts such as sugar skulls and paper flowers for decorating home altars.

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yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Maude Kerns Art Center
Eugene, OR

The Maude Kerns Art Center celebrates the 30th annual Día de los Muertos Exhibit in 2023 with artwork, community altars, and a special Day of the Dead Gift Shop. The exhibit opens October 13th and runs through November 3rd.

The Mexican Day of the Dead celebration acknowledges the link between the communities of the living and the dead. The holiday blends the ancient harvest rituals of the Aztec god of death and the Roman Catholic holidays of All Souls and All Saints days. On November 1 and 2, the dead are thought to return to partake in the activities of the living. Holiday activities include the creation of altars that welcome deceased loved ones.

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After years of relentless dedication and hard work, Tasveer is ecstatic to stand proudly beside a festival that has not just transcended boundaries but shattered them entirely. This year, Tasveer has etched its name in history as the first-ever Oscar-qualifying film festival within the South Asian realm.

This prestigious recognition from the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences is a culmination of our tireless efforts and unwavering commitment to the South Asian dream. It signifies a monumental shift in the landscape of South Asian cinema, streamlining the path for deserving films. Winning at Tasveer now opens a direct gateway for these films to enter the esteemed Oscar race, eliminating the need for intermediaries and allowing authentic South Asian narratives to shine unfiltered and unmediated.

No longer confined to the limitations of a handful of film festivals like Sundance, Tribeca, or Cannes, which often restrict the visibility and screening opportunities for South Asian films, this recognition empowers our cinema to compete on the grandest stage.

Oct 12th-15th: In theaters in Seattle
Oct 16th-22nd: Virtual on TasveerTV

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Check one, two, three 🎤 “Sound Check! The Music We Make”, is a new exhibit at Wing Luke Museum on view from Sunday October 15, 2023 until September 14, 2024 🎧🎶💿🎹

Sound Check! celebrates the role of music in the lives of AANHPI communities. Dive into community-based stories as well as the experiences of AANHPI professionals in the music industry. Audiophiles and historians will be able to browse archival materials, photos, and artworks while also indulging in interactive audio-visual installations.

Featured artists include Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto of Soundgarden; singer-songwriter Carly Ann Calbero; jazz drummer Akira Tana; musician Roger Rigor; hip hop artist Geo Quibuyen of Blue Scholars and many more.


Don’t forget about the perks of becoming a Museum Member like unlimited free general admission and opportunities to see exhibits first at special Museum Member Receptions!

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Frank S. Matsura: Portraits from the Borderland features studio images by Washington-based Japanese photographer Frank Sakae Matsura (1873-1913) alongside period-specific American Indian regalia from the Columbia Plateau. Exploring Indigenous representation through a multi-dimensional lens, the photographs and objects on view detail some of Matsura’s most culturally significant work against a backdrop of regional transformation.

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This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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Social Justice Film Festival & Institute
Seattle , WA

The Social Justice Film Festival serves as a dynamic forum where art and social justice intersect to build community beyond borders and lift-up voices, issues, and stories of public importance.

As one of the few film organizations exclusively focused on social justice, they feature a diversity of mostly independent films and programs that promote civic engagement. They welcome first-time and aspiring filmmakers, especially from underrepresented communities, in addition to more established social justice filmmakers.

In-Person October 11-15, 2023
Streaming Online October 16-22, 2023

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

View Event

An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

View Event
ACT A Contemporary Theatre
Seattle, WA

Guitars tuned. Mic checked. Get ready to rock! This darkly funny, electric new play with music tells the story of a Khmer Rouge survivor returning to Cambodia for the first time in thirty years, as his daughter prepares to prosecute one of Cambodia’s most infamous war criminals. Backed by a live band playing contemporary Dengue Fever hits and classic Cambodian oldies, this thrilling story toggles back and forth in time as father and daughter face the music of the past. Lauren Yee brings us an intimate rock epic about family secrets set against a dark chapter of Cambodian history.

Children under 5, including babes in arms, will not be admitted.

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Seattle Polish Film Festival
Seattle, WA

Seattle Polish Film Festival (SPFF) is an annual event showcasing the best of Polish cinema since the early 1990s. The SPFF is produced and presented by the Seattle-Gdynia Sister City Association.

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Earshot Jazz Society of Seattle
Seattle , WA

The Earshot Jazz Festival returns this year with performances from both resident and world renowned artists at venues all around Seattle!
Earshot Jazz Festival is back with “Seattle’s most important annual jazz event” (DownBeat), once again presenting today’s brilliant jazz artists over the course of 30 fall days in venues all around the city. In p