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Attend festivals, performances, exhibits, workshops and more! Use simple filters to find specific types of events near you.

Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

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Lan Su Chinese Garden
Portland, OR

We’re celebrating the beauty and cultural significance of chrysanthemums throughout November, in perfect harmony with the traditional Chinese Double Ninth Festival. These exquisite flowers hold a rich and storied history in Chinese culture, symbolizing traits such as longevity, nobility, and endurance.

Join us for a series of horticultural programs centered around chrysanthemums, paying tribute to their illustrious heritage. This includes the return of our enchanting nighttime floral designer showcase, “Nights of the Golden Flower.” You can also partake in enlightening plant walks and witness insightful cultivation demonstrations, all designed to deepen your appreciation for this cherished bloom and its profound role in Chinese heritage.

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Thanks to the popularity of the instantly recognizable Great Wave—cited everywhere from book covers and Lego sets to anime and emoji— Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) has become one of the most famous and influential artists in the world. This major exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), takes a new approach to the work of the versatile master, pairing more than 100 of his woodblock prints, paintings, and illustrated books from the MFA’s renowned collection with more than 200 works by his teachers, students, rivals, and admirers. Join us to explore Hokusai’s impact through the centuries and around the globe, on artists including Yoshitomo Nara, Chiho Aoshima, and Helen Frankenthaler.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Check one, two, three 🎤 “Sound Check! The Music We Make”, is a new exhibit at Wing Luke Museum on view from Sunday October 15, 2023 until September 14, 2024 🎧🎶💿🎹

Sound Check! celebrates the role of music in the lives of AANHPI communities. Dive into community-based stories as well as the experiences of AANHPI professionals in the music industry. Audiophiles and historians will be able to browse archival materials, photos, and artworks while also indulging in interactive audio-visual installations.

Featured artists include Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto of Soundgarden; singer-songwriter Carly Ann Calbero; jazz drummer Akira Tana; musician Roger Rigor; hip hop artist Geo Quibuyen of Blue Scholars and many more.


Don’t forget about the perks of becoming a Museum Member like unlimited free general admission and opportunities to see exhibits first at special Museum Member Receptions!

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Advance Native Political Leadership
Anchorage, AK

Exciting Announcement! Alaska, home to the largest Native population share in the nation, is taking a powerful step towards amplifying Native voices in elected office. Did you know that out of the 178,000+ Native people residing in the state, only 58 currently hold elected positions?

Joining forces with @nativepeoplesaction, the #NativeLeadershipInstitute will be empowering Native leaders in Alaska to run for office – and win! Despite representing at least 24.4% of the population, Native peoples hold a mere 3% of elected offices in our great state.

📢 We’re thrilled to announce our first in-person training class in Alaska scheduled for November 8-12, 2023. This first-of-its kind program will equip Native leaders in Alaska with the skills, knowledge, and support they need to make a significant impact in the political landscape.

Are you ready to make history? Join us for this transformative training, and help reshape Native representation in Alaska’s elected offices. Together, let’s weave the threads of our ancestral teachings into the fabric of Alaska’s political landscape, fostering inclusivity, environmental stewardship, and cultural preservation for generations to come!

To learn more about the #NativeLeadershipInstitute and start your application, click on the link in our bio.

This training is offered at no cost to participants. Transportation, accommodation, and meals will be provided by Advance Native Political Leadership Action Fund.

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Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement (STALM)
, WA
The Tribe’s Environmental and Natural Resources Team has been hard at work planning some fantastic upcoming restoration projects on Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands that you can contribute to! What better way to help redefine recreation by building reciprocity with the lands – while also enjoying all the benefits of being outside in community (both human and ecological)? Here’s the link to more from the ENR team about each event and the RSVP links! https://enr.snoqualmietribe.us/events/
Can’t make it? Stay tuned for additional opportunities!
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This exhibit showcases the work of folx who are part of the SWANA (Southwest Asia and North Africa) stitching community. The works encompass diasporic, immigrant, mixed, and queer stitches in a contemporary context with an ancestral throughline across time and space, oceans, continents, languages and mediums. The textile works range from Palestinian Tatreez embroidery and Egyptian Khayamiya appliqué to Armenian Janyak needlelace and many other regional stitches. Additionally, there will be new works drawing from multiple artistic disciplines, both ancient and modern, including writing, multimedia, propaganda, visual and plastic art, and inter-and-multi-disciplinary works. The event will include presentations by the artists and other cultural programming as well. And of course all SWANA events include food, music and dance.

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to announce that we have teamed up with the City of Shoreline and the Spartan Recreation Center to host the Arte de la Raza exhibition running Nov.2nd-Jan. 24th and featuring:
Che Lopez
Iris Sanchez
Jake Prendez
Rolando Avila
Teresa Martinez
Yessica Marquez
The exhibition opens Nov. 2nd which is also the same day as their Dia de los Muertos Festival!!

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Welcome!

Please Sign Up and Join Us For This Great Opportunity to Let Your Voices Be Heard.

We are excited to share this event with our southern Oregon students, for students 8th-12th Grades, who identify as African American and/or Black.

This program is a four-hour workshop at the University of Oregon, that will give students an opportunity to focus on “Celebrating Our Voices.”

Students will:

Learn to compose and develop stories to help, put in to words, THEIR TRUE experiences in their communities, schools, and state.
Have the opportunity to meet other African American/Black students from across the state in order to network and share experiences.
Create a Journalistic piece of work that will focus on THEIR voices and experiences.

In conjunction with the main organizers of the event, the partners of the Southern Oregon Black and African American Student Success Alliance (SOBAASS) are also providing an opportunity for our students to attend this amazing workshop.

Students will need to register for this event HERE, no later than 5 p.m. on Tuesday, November 1, 2022. We will reach out to students and Parents once we have your application, for permission slips.

We will also contact each student’s school, once we have their application, to have this program declared as an “EXCUSED Absence.”

Transportation will be provided from southern Oregon from a centralized location. Expect to leave, by bus, no later than 7:30 a.m. and return by 8 p.m. on November 8th.

We will provide a continental breakfast, lunch, and snacks for the day.

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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Uprise Collective
Hybrid

We are thrilled to announce our sixth annual Selah Storytelling Series! This year we will have amazing storytellers share stories of Creation, Resistance, and Healing in a hybrid space both in person and on zoom!
Stay tuned to learn about our storytellers, the location, and this years Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thankstaking celebration!
Access:
In person: ADA space with ADA bathrooms. Masks required. More details to come on parking and seating.
On-line: ASL and CART provided.
Details:
In its sixth year, the Selah Series provides a BIPOC-centered storytelling space for community members to share the fruits of their ancestors’ wisdom, resistance, and survivance, and an opportunity for all of us to build community that is reflective of our collective strength.
Creation Stories
November 2, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will be sharing stories of the creation of the Earth and the universe that come from indigenous cultural histories. From the Turtle Continent to the Popol Vuh to Mawu the Moon Being, this event is about reclaiming how the world was made.
Resistance Stories
November 9, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will share stories of protest, organizing, collective bargaining, and community care. What can we learn from those that came before us? What tactics are we using now to reimagine systems? The road map to social uplift has been written, and written well.
Healing Stories:
November 16, 2022, 6:00pm-8:00pm PST
How do we practice care in our communities outside of Western, capitalist, white supremacist models? The focus of this event will be on the holistic, indigenous, decolonized wellness that targeted communities use to engage in healing. From naturopathy to indigenous herbalism to healing tones, the focus of the event is to honor ancestral knowledge and our special knack for survival.
We also have a culminating meal-share event on Saturday, November 25th, Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thanks-taking. We’ll eat, build community, and BIPOC performers will share their gifts.

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s'gʷi gʷi ʔ altxʷ House of Welcome / Evergreen Longhouse
Olympia, WA

This show is dedicated to Veterans, past and present and will be held at the Evergreen Gallery from October 16 – December 30, 2023. There will be a Grand Opening on Thursday, October 19 from 3 – 6 pm.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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American Romanian Cultural Society - ARCS Project
Seattle , WA

The Romanian Film Festival Seattle is excited to celebrate its 10th anniversary edition this year. Running Nov. 4-12, the festival will mark the return to SIFF Uptown Cinema Nov. 4-5 (its home until 2019), and will continue the following weekend at Northwest Film Forum. Not in Seattle? We’ll have a great selection of films online as well!

Started in 2014 with the scope of bringing Romanian cinema to audiences in Seattle, the festival has adapted and blossomed over the years. It soldiered through the pandemic, thanks to a loyal audience that followed it as it transformed to a virtual program. This year it continues to enjoy a hybrid format, with an online selection available in the continental US and in-person screenings at SIFF Cinema Uptown and Northwest Film Forum.

Through the years, each edition has brought thought-provoking and award-winning productions from Romania and Eastern Europe, giving a platform to upcoming and established directors alike.

This year’s theme “One Eye Laughing, One Eye Crying” is a nod to its first edition in 2014 – the duality of the Romanian spirit that propels it forward in spite of constant hardships. The first year saw an overwhelming success following a grassroots effort to mobilize the Romanian community in the greater Seattle area.

This year’s nuanced edition celebrates the rich cultural fabric of Romania, while exploring current topics with the unflinchingly honest perspectives that fans of the festival have come to expect from Romanian cinema. The program will comprise of critically-acclaimed films and newly released films, and featuring special guests from Romania.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Wa Na Wari
Seattle, WA

We are very excited to announce that the first graduating cohort of our Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute is ready to share their work with the world. They have spent the last year creating art from the oral histories they recorded, and the upcoming exhibit at Wa Na Wari is the culmination of that work. We invite you to join us for the opening of this exhibit:
“Honored to Tell”: An exhibit of art and oral histories created by the first cohort to graduate from the Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute
Featured artists: Brenetta Ward, Akoiya Harris, Ariel Paine, Sierra Parsons, Ricky Reyes, Nia Amina Minor, Brea Wilson, Eboni Wyatt
Art Opening & Reception: Saturday, November 4, 2023, from 6-8pm
6:30pm Hear from the artists
7:00pm Dance performance by Akoiya Harris and Nia Amina Minor
At Wa Na Wari, 911 24th Ave. in Seattle’s historic Central District
Refreshments provided
Listen to the stories of Black waterfront workers, Black educators, Black barbers and beauticians, and Black dancers; stories that the artists have incorporated into textile art, dance, film, zines, listening stations, and more.
The exhibit will be on view until January 20, 2024.
More info at https://www.wanawari.org/sbshi_show

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Wild Diversity
Portland, OR

This event is reserved for Adults who identify as BIPOC and/or are part of the LGBTQ community. Must create a free Participant Account to sign up for this workshop.

As the cloudy season hugs us it is time to huddle together and share stories about adventure and resilience and the outdoors. This storytelling season will bring us together to hear trials and triumphs in the outdoors, conservation and adventure. Join for this wonderful community night. Come and listen or sign up to tell your story. 

Storyteller Sign Up: https://forms.gle/AVZxPXMnq8zoDa2e7

Our Host & Facilitator:

Rico she/her

myyoshaiwara@gmail.com

Mariko Yoshiwara

Please ensure that your profile is up to date and that you have signed the updated waivers and provided all info requested. 

There is available parking in our parking lot and street parking. WD is not responsible for stolen or damaged property.

To receive a full refund or credit participants must cancel their registration 7 days prior to a day event or 16 days prior to a multi-day event. Read our full Cancelation and Refund Policy here.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

View Event
Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

View Event

Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

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Lan Su Chinese Garden
Portland, OR

We’re celebrating the beauty and cultural significance of chrysanthemums throughout November, in perfect harmony with the traditional Chinese Double Ninth Festival. These exquisite flowers hold a rich and storied history in Chinese culture, symbolizing traits such as longevity, nobility, and endurance.

Join us for a series of horticultural programs centered around chrysanthemums, paying tribute to their illustrious heritage. This includes the return of our enchanting nighttime floral designer showcase, “Nights of the Golden Flower.” You can also partake in enlightening plant walks and witness insightful cultivation demonstrations, all designed to deepen your appreciation for this cherished bloom and its profound role in Chinese heritage.

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Thanks to the popularity of the instantly recognizable Great Wave—cited everywhere from book covers and Lego sets to anime and emoji— Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) has become one of the most famous and influential artists in the world. This major exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), takes a new approach to the work of the versatile master, pairing more than 100 of his woodblock prints, paintings, and illustrated books from the MFA’s renowned collection with more than 200 works by his teachers, students, rivals, and admirers. Join us to explore Hokusai’s impact through the centuries and around the globe, on artists including Yoshitomo Nara, Chiho Aoshima, and Helen Frankenthaler.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Check one, two, three 🎤 “Sound Check! The Music We Make”, is a new exhibit at Wing Luke Museum on view from Sunday October 15, 2023 until September 14, 2024 🎧🎶💿🎹

Sound Check! celebrates the role of music in the lives of AANHPI communities. Dive into community-based stories as well as the experiences of AANHPI professionals in the music industry. Audiophiles and historians will be able to browse archival materials, photos, and artworks while also indulging in interactive audio-visual installations.

Featured artists include Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto of Soundgarden; singer-songwriter Carly Ann Calbero; jazz drummer Akira Tana; musician Roger Rigor; hip hop artist Geo Quibuyen of Blue Scholars and many more.


Don’t forget about the perks of becoming a Museum Member like unlimited free general admission and opportunities to see exhibits first at special Museum Member Receptions!

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Advance Native Political Leadership
Anchorage, AK

Exciting Announcement! Alaska, home to the largest Native population share in the nation, is taking a powerful step towards amplifying Native voices in elected office. Did you know that out of the 178,000+ Native people residing in the state, only 58 currently hold elected positions?

Joining forces with @nativepeoplesaction, the #NativeLeadershipInstitute will be empowering Native leaders in Alaska to run for office – and win! Despite representing at least 24.4% of the population, Native peoples hold a mere 3% of elected offices in our great state.

📢 We’re thrilled to announce our first in-person training class in Alaska scheduled for November 8-12, 2023. This first-of-its kind program will equip Native leaders in Alaska with the skills, knowledge, and support they need to make a significant impact in the political landscape.

Are you ready to make history? Join us for this transformative training, and help reshape Native representation in Alaska’s elected offices. Together, let’s weave the threads of our ancestral teachings into the fabric of Alaska’s political landscape, fostering inclusivity, environmental stewardship, and cultural preservation for generations to come!

To learn more about the #NativeLeadershipInstitute and start your application, click on the link in our bio.

This training is offered at no cost to participants. Transportation, accommodation, and meals will be provided by Advance Native Political Leadership Action Fund.

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Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement (STALM)
, WA
The Tribe’s Environmental and Natural Resources Team has been hard at work planning some fantastic upcoming restoration projects on Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands that you can contribute to! What better way to help redefine recreation by building reciprocity with the lands – while also enjoying all the benefits of being outside in community (both human and ecological)? Here’s the link to more from the ENR team about each event and the RSVP links! https://enr.snoqualmietribe.us/events/
Can’t make it? Stay tuned for additional opportunities!
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This exhibit showcases the work of folx who are part of the SWANA (Southwest Asia and North Africa) stitching community. The works encompass diasporic, immigrant, mixed, and queer stitches in a contemporary context with an ancestral throughline across time and space, oceans, continents, languages and mediums. The textile works range from Palestinian Tatreez embroidery and Egyptian Khayamiya appliqué to Armenian Janyak needlelace and many other regional stitches. Additionally, there will be new works drawing from multiple artistic disciplines, both ancient and modern, including writing, multimedia, propaganda, visual and plastic art, and inter-and-multi-disciplinary works. The event will include presentations by the artists and other cultural programming as well. And of course all SWANA events include food, music and dance.

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES AND WAHONE (WE ARE HERE OREGON NATIVE EMPLOYEES) ARE HOSTING A NATIVE AMERICAN & ALASKA NATIVE HERITAGE CELEBRATION. THIS YEAR WE ARE HONORING THE SUPREME COURT’S UPHOLDING OF THE INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT. JOIN US FOR PRESENTATIONS AND SPEAKERS, CHECK OUT THE TALENTED INDIGENOUS VENDORS AND ARTISTS, SHARE A MEAL OF TRADITIONAL FOODS, AND VIEW A SERIES OF SHORT FILMS BY FORMER FOSTER YOUTH AND INDIGENOUS FILMMAKERS.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to announce that we have teamed up with the City of Shoreline and the Spartan Recreation Center to host the Arte de la Raza exhibition running Nov.2nd-Jan. 24th and featuring:
Che Lopez
Iris Sanchez
Jake Prendez
Rolando Avila
Teresa Martinez
Yessica Marquez
The exhibition opens Nov. 2nd which is also the same day as their Dia de los Muertos Festival!!

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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Uprise Collective
Hybrid

We are thrilled to announce our sixth annual Selah Storytelling Series! This year we will have amazing storytellers share stories of Creation, Resistance, and Healing in a hybrid space both in person and on zoom!
Stay tuned to learn about our storytellers, the location, and this years Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thankstaking celebration!
Access:
In person: ADA space with ADA bathrooms. Masks required. More details to come on parking and seating.
On-line: ASL and CART provided.
Details:
In its sixth year, the Selah Series provides a BIPOC-centered storytelling space for community members to share the fruits of their ancestors’ wisdom, resistance, and survivance, and an opportunity for all of us to build community that is reflective of our collective strength.
Creation Stories
November 2, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will be sharing stories of the creation of the Earth and the universe that come from indigenous cultural histories. From the Turtle Continent to the Popol Vuh to Mawu the Moon Being, this event is about reclaiming how the world was made.
Resistance Stories
November 9, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will share stories of protest, organizing, collective bargaining, and community care. What can we learn from those that came before us? What tactics are we using now to reimagine systems? The road map to social uplift has been written, and written well.
Healing Stories:
November 16, 2022, 6:00pm-8:00pm PST
How do we practice care in our communities outside of Western, capitalist, white supremacist models? The focus of this event will be on the holistic, indigenous, decolonized wellness that targeted communities use to engage in healing. From naturopathy to indigenous herbalism to healing tones, the focus of the event is to honor ancestral knowledge and our special knack for survival.
We also have a culminating meal-share event on Saturday, November 25th, Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thanks-taking. We’ll eat, build community, and BIPOC performers will share their gifts.

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s'gʷi gʷi ʔ altxʷ House of Welcome / Evergreen Longhouse
Olympia, WA

This show is dedicated to Veterans, past and present and will be held at the Evergreen Gallery from October 16 – December 30, 2023. There will be a Grand Opening on Thursday, October 19 from 3 – 6 pm.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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American Romanian Cultural Society - ARCS Project
Seattle , WA

The Romanian Film Festival Seattle is excited to celebrate its 10th anniversary edition this year. Running Nov. 4-12, the festival will mark the return to SIFF Uptown Cinema Nov. 4-5 (its home until 2019), and will continue the following weekend at Northwest Film Forum. Not in Seattle? We’ll have a great selection of films online as well!

Started in 2014 with the scope of bringing Romanian cinema to audiences in Seattle, the festival has adapted and blossomed over the years. It soldiered through the pandemic, thanks to a loyal audience that followed it as it transformed to a virtual program. This year it continues to enjoy a hybrid format, with an online selection available in the continental US and in-person screenings at SIFF Cinema Uptown and Northwest Film Forum.

Through the years, each edition has brought thought-provoking and award-winning productions from Romania and Eastern Europe, giving a platform to upcoming and established directors alike.

This year’s theme “One Eye Laughing, One Eye Crying” is a nod to its first edition in 2014 – the duality of the Romanian spirit that propels it forward in spite of constant hardships. The first year saw an overwhelming success following a grassroots effort to mobilize the Romanian community in the greater Seattle area.

This year’s nuanced edition celebrates the rich cultural fabric of Romania, while exploring current topics with the unflinchingly honest perspectives that fans of the festival have come to expect from Romanian cinema. The program will comprise of critically-acclaimed films and newly released films, and featuring special guests from Romania.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Wa Na Wari
Seattle, WA

We are very excited to announce that the first graduating cohort of our Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute is ready to share their work with the world. They have spent the last year creating art from the oral histories they recorded, and the upcoming exhibit at Wa Na Wari is the culmination of that work. We invite you to join us for the opening of this exhibit:
“Honored to Tell”: An exhibit of art and oral histories created by the first cohort to graduate from the Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute
Featured artists: Brenetta Ward, Akoiya Harris, Ariel Paine, Sierra Parsons, Ricky Reyes, Nia Amina Minor, Brea Wilson, Eboni Wyatt
Art Opening & Reception: Saturday, November 4, 2023, from 6-8pm
6:30pm Hear from the artists
7:00pm Dance performance by Akoiya Harris and Nia Amina Minor
At Wa Na Wari, 911 24th Ave. in Seattle’s historic Central District
Refreshments provided
Listen to the stories of Black waterfront workers, Black educators, Black barbers and beauticians, and Black dancers; stories that the artists have incorporated into textile art, dance, film, zines, listening stations, and more.
The exhibit will be on view until January 20, 2024.
More info at https://www.wanawari.org/sbshi_show

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Wenatchee Valley Museum & Cultural Center
Wenatchee, WA

On Thursday, Nov. 9, 2023, between 7-9 PM, attendees will have the chance to view this widely acclaimed film, which won the 2023 Dreamspeakers Feature Documentary award.
Since 1493, the so-called Doctrine of Discovery has justified the dispossession and decimation of the Indigenous inhabitants of North America and brought us to our present environmental breaking point. The Doctrine of Recovery is an Indigenous antidote to rebalance Earth systems, restore the sacred feminine, and ensure our species survival.
Three generations of Tribal women – Casey Camp-Horinek, Crystle Lightning, and Juliet Langley Hayes – speak on what has gone unspoken, and unapologetically expose the influence of founding patriarchs and white supremacy in places most never thought to look, and in doing so demonstrate the ongoing and devastating formula patterned by the Doctrine of Discovery.

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Seattle Public Library
Seattle, WA

Bryan Washington, the bestselling, award-winning author of Memorial and Lot, visits Seattle upon the occasion of his latest release, Family Meal, an irresistible, intimate novel about two young men, once best friends, whose lives collide again after a loss. Kim Fu, local author of most recently Lesser Known Monsters of the 21st Century, will join Bryan in onstage conversation.

In Family Meal, Cam is living in Los Angeles and falling apart after the love of his life has died. Kai’s ghost won’t leave Cam alone; his spectral visits wild, tender, and unexpected. When Cam returns to his hometown of Houston, he crashes back into the orbit of his former best friend, TJ, and TJ’s family bakery. TJ’s not sure how to navigate this changed Cam, impenetrably cool and self-destructing, or their charged estrangement. Can they find a way past all that has been said – and left unsaid – to save each other? Could they find a way back to being okay again, or maybe for the first time?

When secrets and wounds become so insurmountable that they devour us from within, hope and sustenance and friendship can come from the most unlikely source. Spanning Los Angeles, Houston, and Osaka, Family Meal is a story about how the people who know us the longest can hurt us the most, but how they also set the standard for love. With his signature generosity and eye for food, sex, love, and the moments that make us the most human, Bryan Washington returns with a brilliant new novel.

Bryan Washington is the author of the story collection Lot and the bestselling novel Memorial. He is also the winner of a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 Award, a New York Public Library Young Lions Award, an Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence, an International Dylan Thomas Prize, a Lambda Literary Award, and an O. Henry Prize, and was a finalist for the James Tait Black Prize, the Joyce Carol Oates Prize, a PEN/Robert W. Bingham prize finalist, and a National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction. He is a columnist for The New York Times Magazine and his fiction has appeared in The New Yorker and The Best American Short Stories. He divides his time between Houston and Osaka.

Kim Fu is the author most recently of Lesser Known Monsters of the 21st Century, finalist for the Giller Prize. She is also the author of For Today I Am a Boy which won the Edmund White Award for Debut Fiction and was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award, as well as a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice. Her second novel, The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore, was a finalist for the Washington State Book Award and the OLA Evergreen Award. Fu’s writing has appeared in Granta, the Atlantic, the New York Times, Hazlitt, and the TLS. She lives in Seattle.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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THE ALASKA FOOD POLICY COUNCIL, ALASKA FARM BUREAU, AND WESTERN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH & EDUCATION ARE PARTNERING FOR THE 7TH SESQUIANNUAL ALASKA FOOD FESTIVAL & CONFERENCE, IN COMBINATION WITH THE ALASKA FARM CONVENTION & TRADESHOW.
Alaska Farm Bureau supports, educates, and advocates for Alaska Agriculture, helping build and grow farmers and ranchers across Alaska. Alaska Farm Bureau is the largest agriculture-related organization in the State of Alaska. We are here to support Alaska growers regardless of the product grown or method of production. Alaska agriculture affects us all.
Alaska Food Policy Council’s goal is to create a healthier, more secure, and more self-reliant Alaska by improving our food system. The AFPC is open to anyone interested in improving Alaska’s food systems – agencies and individuals representing federal and state agencies, tribal entities, schools, university programs, farmers, fisheries, and food systems businesses.
Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) mission is to advance innovations that improve profitability, stewardship, and quality of life in American agriculture by investing in groundbreaking research and education. To achieve that, Western SARE believes that our programs must include the involvement of agricultural producers from inception to finish, and therefore we require producer involvement in the planning, design, implementation, and educational outreach of any funded project.
AFPC’S GOALS FOR THE CONFERENCE
AND FESTIVAL ARE TO:
(1) increase awareness of Alaska food issues among the general population;
(2) provide training, resources, and networking opportunities to increase involvement in local food issues by community members and decision-makers; and
3) increase connections and build community between the public, Alaska food businesses, NGOs, governmental entities, Tribal entities, and others to support local economic development and innovative solutions.
*Please note that the content and views presented during this event do not necessarily represent those of the Alaska Food Policy Council or our partners. As a non-partisan, non-profit organization, we seek a broad presentation of viewpoints and participation.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

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Lan Su Chinese Garden
Portland, OR

We’re celebrating the beauty and cultural significance of chrysanthemums throughout November, in perfect harmony with the traditional Chinese Double Ninth Festival. These exquisite flowers hold a rich and storied history in Chinese culture, symbolizing traits such as longevity, nobility, and endurance.

Join us for a series of horticultural programs centered around chrysanthemums, paying tribute to their illustrious heritage. This includes the return of our enchanting nighttime floral designer showcase, “Nights of the Golden Flower.” You can also partake in enlightening plant walks and witness insightful cultivation demonstrations, all designed to deepen your appreciation for this cherished bloom and its profound role in Chinese heritage.

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Thanks to the popularity of the instantly recognizable Great Wave—cited everywhere from book covers and Lego sets to anime and emoji— Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) has become one of the most famous and influential artists in the world. This major exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), takes a new approach to the work of the versatile master, pairing more than 100 of his woodblock prints, paintings, and illustrated books from the MFA’s renowned collection with more than 200 works by his teachers, students, rivals, and admirers. Join us to explore Hokusai’s impact through the centuries and around the globe, on artists including Yoshitomo Nara, Chiho Aoshima, and Helen Frankenthaler.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Check one, two, three 🎤 “Sound Check! The Music We Make”, is a new exhibit at Wing Luke Museum on view from Sunday October 15, 2023 until September 14, 2024 🎧🎶💿🎹

Sound Check! celebrates the role of music in the lives of AANHPI communities. Dive into community-based stories as well as the experiences of AANHPI professionals in the music industry. Audiophiles and historians will be able to browse archival materials, photos, and artworks while also indulging in interactive audio-visual installations.

Featured artists include Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto of Soundgarden; singer-songwriter Carly Ann Calbero; jazz drummer Akira Tana; musician Roger Rigor; hip hop artist Geo Quibuyen of Blue Scholars and many more.


Don’t forget about the perks of becoming a Museum Member like unlimited free general admission and opportunities to see exhibits first at special Museum Member Receptions!

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Advance Native Political Leadership
Anchorage, AK

Exciting Announcement! Alaska, home to the largest Native population share in the nation, is taking a powerful step towards amplifying Native voices in elected office. Did you know that out of the 178,000+ Native people residing in the state, only 58 currently hold elected positions?

Joining forces with @nativepeoplesaction, the #NativeLeadershipInstitute will be empowering Native leaders in Alaska to run for office – and win! Despite representing at least 24.4% of the population, Native peoples hold a mere 3% of elected offices in our great state.

📢 We’re thrilled to announce our first in-person training class in Alaska scheduled for November 8-12, 2023. This first-of-its kind program will equip Native leaders in Alaska with the skills, knowledge, and support they need to make a significant impact in the political landscape.

Are you ready to make history? Join us for this transformative training, and help reshape Native representation in Alaska’s elected offices. Together, let’s weave the threads of our ancestral teachings into the fabric of Alaska’s political landscape, fostering inclusivity, environmental stewardship, and cultural preservation for generations to come!

To learn more about the #NativeLeadershipInstitute and start your application, click on the link in our bio.

This training is offered at no cost to participants. Transportation, accommodation, and meals will be provided by Advance Native Political Leadership Action Fund.

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Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement (STALM)
, WA
The Tribe’s Environmental and Natural Resources Team has been hard at work planning some fantastic upcoming restoration projects on Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands that you can contribute to! What better way to help redefine recreation by building reciprocity with the lands – while also enjoying all the benefits of being outside in community (both human and ecological)? Here’s the link to more from the ENR team about each event and the RSVP links! https://enr.snoqualmietribe.us/events/
Can’t make it? Stay tuned for additional opportunities!
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This exhibit showcases the work of folx who are part of the SWANA (Southwest Asia and North Africa) stitching community. The works encompass diasporic, immigrant, mixed, and queer stitches in a contemporary context with an ancestral throughline across time and space, oceans, continents, languages and mediums. The textile works range from Palestinian Tatreez embroidery and Egyptian Khayamiya appliqué to Armenian Janyak needlelace and many other regional stitches. Additionally, there will be new works drawing from multiple artistic disciplines, both ancient and modern, including writing, multimedia, propaganda, visual and plastic art, and inter-and-multi-disciplinary works. The event will include presentations by the artists and other cultural programming as well. And of course all SWANA events include food, music and dance.

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to announce that we have teamed up with the City of Shoreline and the Spartan Recreation Center to host the Arte de la Raza exhibition running Nov.2nd-Jan. 24th and featuring:
Che Lopez
Iris Sanchez
Jake Prendez
Rolando Avila
Teresa Martinez
Yessica Marquez
The exhibition opens Nov. 2nd which is also the same day as their Dia de los Muertos Festival!!

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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Uprise Collective
Hybrid

We are thrilled to announce our sixth annual Selah Storytelling Series! This year we will have amazing storytellers share stories of Creation, Resistance, and Healing in a hybrid space both in person and on zoom!
Stay tuned to learn about our storytellers, the location, and this years Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thankstaking celebration!
Access:
In person: ADA space with ADA bathrooms. Masks required. More details to come on parking and seating.
On-line: ASL and CART provided.
Details:
In its sixth year, the Selah Series provides a BIPOC-centered storytelling space for community members to share the fruits of their ancestors’ wisdom, resistance, and survivance, and an opportunity for all of us to build community that is reflective of our collective strength.
Creation Stories
November 2, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will be sharing stories of the creation of the Earth and the universe that come from indigenous cultural histories. From the Turtle Continent to the Popol Vuh to Mawu the Moon Being, this event is about reclaiming how the world was made.
Resistance Stories
November 9, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will share stories of protest, organizing, collective bargaining, and community care. What can we learn from those that came before us? What tactics are we using now to reimagine systems? The road map to social uplift has been written, and written well.
Healing Stories:
November 16, 2022, 6:00pm-8:00pm PST
How do we practice care in our communities outside of Western, capitalist, white supremacist models? The focus of this event will be on the holistic, indigenous, decolonized wellness that targeted communities use to engage in healing. From naturopathy to indigenous herbalism to healing tones, the focus of the event is to honor ancestral knowledge and our special knack for survival.
We also have a culminating meal-share event on Saturday, November 25th, Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thanks-taking. We’ll eat, build community, and BIPOC performers will share their gifts.

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s'gʷi gʷi ʔ altxʷ House of Welcome / Evergreen Longhouse
Olympia, WA

This show is dedicated to Veterans, past and present and will be held at the Evergreen Gallery from October 16 – December 30, 2023. There will be a Grand Opening on Thursday, October 19 from 3 – 6 pm.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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American Romanian Cultural Society - ARCS Project
Seattle , WA

The Romanian Film Festival Seattle is excited to celebrate its 10th anniversary edition this year. Running Nov. 4-12, the festival will mark the return to SIFF Uptown Cinema Nov. 4-5 (its home until 2019), and will continue the following weekend at Northwest Film Forum. Not in Seattle? We’ll have a great selection of films online as well!

Started in 2014 with the scope of bringing Romanian cinema to audiences in Seattle, the festival has adapted and blossomed over the years. It soldiered through the pandemic, thanks to a loyal audience that followed it as it transformed to a virtual program. This year it continues to enjoy a hybrid format, with an online selection available in the continental US and in-person screenings at SIFF Cinema Uptown and Northwest Film Forum.

Through the years, each edition has brought thought-provoking and award-winning productions from Romania and Eastern Europe, giving a platform to upcoming and established directors alike.

This year’s theme “One Eye Laughing, One Eye Crying” is a nod to its first edition in 2014 – the duality of the Romanian spirit that propels it forward in spite of constant hardships. The first year saw an overwhelming success following a grassroots effort to mobilize the Romanian community in the greater Seattle area.

This year’s nuanced edition celebrates the rich cultural fabric of Romania, while exploring current topics with the unflinchingly honest perspectives that fans of the festival have come to expect from Romanian cinema. The program will comprise of critically-acclaimed films and newly released films, and featuring special guests from Romania.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Wa Na Wari
Seattle, WA

We are very excited to announce that the first graduating cohort of our Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute is ready to share their work with the world. They have spent the last year creating art from the oral histories they recorded, and the upcoming exhibit at Wa Na Wari is the culmination of that work. We invite you to join us for the opening of this exhibit:
“Honored to Tell”: An exhibit of art and oral histories created by the first cohort to graduate from the Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute
Featured artists: Brenetta Ward, Akoiya Harris, Ariel Paine, Sierra Parsons, Ricky Reyes, Nia Amina Minor, Brea Wilson, Eboni Wyatt
Art Opening & Reception: Saturday, November 4, 2023, from 6-8pm
6:30pm Hear from the artists
7:00pm Dance performance by Akoiya Harris and Nia Amina Minor
At Wa Na Wari, 911 24th Ave. in Seattle’s historic Central District
Refreshments provided
Listen to the stories of Black waterfront workers, Black educators, Black barbers and beauticians, and Black dancers; stories that the artists have incorporated into textile art, dance, film, zines, listening stations, and more.
The exhibit will be on view until January 20, 2024.
More info at https://www.wanawari.org/sbshi_show

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Idaho Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
Boise, ID

You are invited to attend the Annual Grand Fiesta Gala and Small Business Awards of the Idaho Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
Small business awards, entertainment, silent and live auction and all
to raise funds for future programs and education to continue to uplift our Hispanic community!

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Please join the Frye Art Museum for a public celebration and concert in honor of the opening of:
Antonio M. Gómez: LINEAJES
Hanako O’Leary: Izanami
Frye Salon

Explore the new exhibitions after-hours and join us in the Auditorium at 7:15 pm for a special performance by Antonio Gómez and his colleagues from Trío Guadalevín, Abel Rocha and Gus Denhard.

About the Performers
A unique collaboration between a folklorist from Mexico City, a lute/oud/guitar player specializing in the early music of Europe, and a globe-traveling percussionist and arts educator, Trío Guadalevín explores the musical dialogue between Indigenous, European, and African cultures that define Latin American identity. With memorable stories and an incredible array of instruments from the Americas, Africa, and Europe, the trio weaves together a tapestry of music, languages, culture, history, and geography. They move seamlessly between the past and present, employing a mix of contemporary, folkloric, and historic melodies sung in Spanish, Zapotec, and Ladino, which ride on rhythms from the Afro-Indigenous son jarocho to the Italian tarantella and Moroccan shabia.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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A Celebration of Native American Heritage Month
Join us for an incredible evening of live music when Native performers Tony Louie, Isaac Tonasket, and Tyus Beebe each take the stage in Pend Oreille Pavilion.

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Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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THE ALASKA FOOD POLICY COUNCIL, ALASKA FARM BUREAU, AND WESTERN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH & EDUCATION ARE PARTNERING FOR THE 7TH SESQUIANNUAL ALASKA FOOD FESTIVAL & CONFERENCE, IN COMBINATION WITH THE ALASKA FARM CONVENTION & TRADESHOW.
Alaska Farm Bureau supports, educates, and advocates for Alaska Agriculture, helping build and grow farmers and ranchers across Alaska. Alaska Farm Bureau is the largest agriculture-related organization in the State of Alaska. We are here to support Alaska growers regardless of the product grown or method of production. Alaska agriculture affects us all.
Alaska Food Policy Council’s goal is to create a healthier, more secure, and more self-reliant Alaska by improving our food system. The AFPC is open to anyone interested in improving Alaska’s food systems – agencies and individuals representing federal and state agencies, tribal entities, schools, university programs, farmers, fisheries, and food systems businesses.
Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) mission is to advance innovations that improve profitability, stewardship, and quality of life in American agriculture by investing in groundbreaking research and education. To achieve that, Western SARE believes that our programs must include the involvement of agricultural producers from inception to finish, and therefore we require producer involvement in the planning, design, implementation, and educational outreach of any funded project.
AFPC’S GOALS FOR THE CONFERENCE
AND FESTIVAL ARE TO:
(1) increase awareness of Alaska food issues among the general population;
(2) provide training, resources, and networking opportunities to increase involvement in local food issues by community members and decision-makers; and
3) increase connections and build community between the public, Alaska food businesses, NGOs, governmental entities, Tribal entities, and others to support local economic development and innovative solutions.
*Please note that the content and views presented during this event do not necessarily represent those of the Alaska Food Policy Council or our partners. As a non-partisan, non-profit organization, we seek a broad presentation of viewpoints and participation.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Explore the second run of this past exhibit with stories sourced from the local Burmese / Myanmar community. With the original exhibit run cut short due to our closure during the pandemic, we’ve taken the opportunity to update the exhibit to include new content covering the military coup that happened in February 2021.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Finlandia Foundation Seattle Chapter
Seattle, WA

The Bazaar is a wonderful meeting place for all Finnish organizations, vendors, and lovers of Finnish culture. We will be sharing Finnish and Nordic related food, treats, gifts, music and dance, and we sincerely hope that you will be part of the celebration! There will be a lunch prepared by The Finnish Choral Society.

The 2023 Finnish Bazaar is scheduled for 10 am to 3 pm on Saturday, November 11, at the Leif Erikson Hall, 2245 NW 57th St. Seattle WA 98107. Event is free along with complimentary coffee.

We hope that you will join the Annual Finnish Bazaar/Joulumarkkinat as we celebrate Finnish community and culture in the Northwest!

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

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Lan Su Chinese Garden
Portland, OR

We’re celebrating the beauty and cultural significance of chrysanthemums throughout November, in perfect harmony with the traditional Chinese Double Ninth Festival. These exquisite flowers hold a rich and storied history in Chinese culture, symbolizing traits such as longevity, nobility, and endurance.

Join us for a series of horticultural programs centered around chrysanthemums, paying tribute to their illustrious heritage. This includes the return of our enchanting nighttime floral designer showcase, “Nights of the Golden Flower.” You can also partake in enlightening plant walks and witness insightful cultivation demonstrations, all designed to deepen your appreciation for this cherished bloom and its profound role in Chinese heritage.

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Thanks to the popularity of the instantly recognizable Great Wave—cited everywhere from book covers and Lego sets to anime and emoji— Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) has become one of the most famous and influential artists in the world. This major exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), takes a new approach to the work of the versatile master, pairing more than 100 of his woodblock prints, paintings, and illustrated books from the MFA’s renowned collection with more than 200 works by his teachers, students, rivals, and admirers. Join us to explore Hokusai’s impact through the centuries and around the globe, on artists including Yoshitomo Nara, Chiho Aoshima, and Helen Frankenthaler.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Check one, two, three 🎤 “Sound Check! The Music We Make”, is a new exhibit at Wing Luke Museum on view from Sunday October 15, 2023 until September 14, 2024 🎧🎶💿🎹

Sound Check! celebrates the role of music in the lives of AANHPI communities. Dive into community-based stories as well as the experiences of AANHPI professionals in the music industry. Audiophiles and historians will be able to browse archival materials, photos, and artworks while also indulging in interactive audio-visual installations.

Featured artists include Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto of Soundgarden; singer-songwriter Carly Ann Calbero; jazz drummer Akira Tana; musician Roger Rigor; hip hop artist Geo Quibuyen of Blue Scholars and many more.


Don’t forget about the perks of becoming a Museum Member like unlimited free general admission and opportunities to see exhibits first at special Museum Member Receptions!

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Advance Native Political Leadership
Anchorage, AK

Exciting Announcement! Alaska, home to the largest Native population share in the nation, is taking a powerful step towards amplifying Native voices in elected office. Did you know that out of the 178,000+ Native people residing in the state, only 58 currently hold elected positions?

Joining forces with @nativepeoplesaction, the #NativeLeadershipInstitute will be empowering Native leaders in Alaska to run for office – and win! Despite representing at least 24.4% of the population, Native peoples hold a mere 3% of elected offices in our great state.

📢 We’re thrilled to announce our first in-person training class in Alaska scheduled for November 8-12, 2023. This first-of-its kind program will equip Native leaders in Alaska with the skills, knowledge, and support they need to make a significant impact in the political landscape.

Are you ready to make history? Join us for this transformative training, and help reshape Native representation in Alaska’s elected offices. Together, let’s weave the threads of our ancestral teachings into the fabric of Alaska’s political landscape, fostering inclusivity, environmental stewardship, and cultural preservation for generations to come!

To learn more about the #NativeLeadershipInstitute and start your application, click on the link in our bio.

This training is offered at no cost to participants. Transportation, accommodation, and meals will be provided by Advance Native Political Leadership Action Fund.

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Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement (STALM)
, WA
The Tribe’s Environmental and Natural Resources Team has been hard at work planning some fantastic upcoming restoration projects on Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands that you can contribute to! What better way to help redefine recreation by building reciprocity with the lands – while also enjoying all the benefits of being outside in community (both human and ecological)? Here’s the link to more from the ENR team about each event and the RSVP links! https://enr.snoqualmietribe.us/events/
Can’t make it? Stay tuned for additional opportunities!
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This exhibit showcases the work of folx who are part of the SWANA (Southwest Asia and North Africa) stitching community. The works encompass diasporic, immigrant, mixed, and queer stitches in a contemporary context with an ancestral throughline across time and space, oceans, continents, languages and mediums. The textile works range from Palestinian Tatreez embroidery and Egyptian Khayamiya appliqué to Armenian Janyak needlelace and many other regional stitches. Additionally, there will be new works drawing from multiple artistic disciplines, both ancient and modern, including writing, multimedia, propaganda, visual and plastic art, and inter-and-multi-disciplinary works. The event will include presentations by the artists and other cultural programming as well. And of course all SWANA events include food, music and dance.

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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Red Eagle Soaring
Seattle, WA

Join us to celebrate the opening of Red Eagle Soaring black box style theater space at Station Space/King Street Station.

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“Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” brings together the artwork of Eugene Landry (1937-1988) with contemporary Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe artists and writers as they explore their cultural roots, tribal identity, and connection to ancestral land. Landry’s artwork offers a look at the political, economic, and cultural challenges the tribe faced during his lifetime—from near termination to federal recognition. Paralyzed by illness as a young man, Landry created his art from a wheelchair, using his non- dominant hand. Conversations with his former portrait models (now tribal elders), reveal his creative resilience and the positive impact he had in their young lives. Now, 35 years after Landry’s passing, a rediscovered collection of Landry’s art inspires a new generation of Shoalwater Bay artists. “Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” will be on view at Astoria Visual Arts November 11 through December 2.

Nov 11, 5:00pm at AVA:
Artist talk/reading with curator Judith Altruda

Dec 2, 1:00pm at AVA:
Contemporary Shoalwater Bay Artists’ Panel Discussion

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Diwali: Lights of India
Seattle, WA
Come celebrate Diwali, the festival of lights, amidst dance, music, arts, and performance and free food.
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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to announce that we have teamed up with the City of Shoreline and the Spartan Recreation Center to host the Arte de la Raza exhibition running Nov.2nd-Jan. 24th and featuring:
Che Lopez
Iris Sanchez
Jake Prendez
Rolando Avila
Teresa Martinez
Yessica Marquez
The exhibition opens Nov. 2nd which is also the same day as their Dia de los Muertos Festival!!

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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The day following Diwali is traditionally celebrated with the Annakut – literally meaning, a mountain of food. Every year thousands of vegetarian delicacies are offered in devotional gratitude for the past year and to seek blessings for the year ahead. The Annakut offering includes snacks, sweets, pickles, spicy dishes, salads, fruit drinks and other items devotionally prepared by devotees. We cordially invite you for darshan of the Annakut with family and friends.

  • Nov 11th: Family Diwali Annakut
    • 12:00 PM – 7:00 PM
  • Nov 12th: Sharda Chopda Pujan (Diwali)
    • 6:00 PM
  • Nov 14th: New Year
    • Aarti: 7:00 AM, 11:30AM, 6:45PM
    • Mandir Darshan: 7:00 AM Onwards
  • Nov 18th: Kids Diwali Celebration
    • 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM
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Uprise Collective
Hybrid

We are thrilled to announce our sixth annual Selah Storytelling Series! This year we will have amazing storytellers share stories of Creation, Resistance, and Healing in a hybrid space both in person and on zoom!
Stay tuned to learn about our storytellers, the location, and this years Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thankstaking celebration!
Access:
In person: ADA space with ADA bathrooms. Masks required. More details to come on parking and seating.
On-line: ASL and CART provided.
Details:
In its sixth year, the Selah Series provides a BIPOC-centered storytelling space for community members to share the fruits of their ancestors’ wisdom, resistance, and survivance, and an opportunity for all of us to build community that is reflective of our collective strength.
Creation Stories
November 2, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will be sharing stories of the creation of the Earth and the universe that come from indigenous cultural histories. From the Turtle Continent to the Popol Vuh to Mawu the Moon Being, this event is about reclaiming how the world was made.
Resistance Stories
November 9, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will share stories of protest, organizing, collective bargaining, and community care. What can we learn from those that came before us? What tactics are we using now to reimagine systems? The road map to social uplift has been written, and written well.
Healing Stories:
November 16, 2022, 6:00pm-8:00pm PST
How do we practice care in our communities outside of Western, capitalist, white supremacist models? The focus of this event will be on the holistic, indigenous, decolonized wellness that targeted communities use to engage in healing. From naturopathy to indigenous herbalism to healing tones, the focus of the event is to honor ancestral knowledge and our special knack for survival.
We also have a culminating meal-share event on Saturday, November 25th, Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thanks-taking. We’ll eat, build community, and BIPOC performers will share their gifts.

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s'gʷi gʷi ʔ altxʷ House of Welcome / Evergreen Longhouse
Olympia, WA

This show is dedicated to Veterans, past and present and will be held at the Evergreen Gallery from October 16 – December 30, 2023. There will be a Grand Opening on Thursday, October 19 from 3 – 6 pm.

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UTSAV
Monroe, WA

Join us for an unforgettable celebration of Diwali at the Evergreen Speedway in Monroe, WA, USA. Experience the joy and blessings of the Laxmi Ganesh Pooja in person. This event promises to be a vibrant and spiritual gathering, filled with traditional rituals and cultural festivities. Don’t miss out on this auspicious occasion to seek the blessings of the divine deities. Mark your calendars for a memorable Diwali celebration!

We are delighted to invite you to this auspicious event. As a part of the Laxmi Ganesh Pooja, you will receive an exquisite Pooja Thali for FREE as part of this event.

*REGISTRATION REQUIRED; VARIOUS TIME SLOTS AVALABLE THROUGHOUT THE DAY*

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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American Romanian Cultural Society - ARCS Project
Seattle , WA

The Romanian Film Festival Seattle is excited to celebrate its 10th anniversary edition this year. Running Nov. 4-12, the festival will mark the return to SIFF Uptown Cinema Nov. 4-5 (its home until 2019), and will continue the following weekend at Northwest Film Forum. Not in Seattle? We’ll have a great selection of films online as well!

Started in 2014 with the scope of bringing Romanian cinema to audiences in Seattle, the festival has adapted and blossomed over the years. It soldiered through the pandemic, thanks to a loyal audience that followed it as it transformed to a virtual program. This year it continues to enjoy a hybrid format, with an online selection available in the continental US and in-person screenings at SIFF Cinema Uptown and Northwest Film Forum.

Through the years, each edition has brought thought-provoking and award-winning productions from Romania and Eastern Europe, giving a platform to upcoming and established directors alike.

This year’s theme “One Eye Laughing, One Eye Crying” is a nod to its first edition in 2014 – the duality of the Romanian spirit that propels it forward in spite of constant hardships. The first year saw an overwhelming success following a grassroots effort to mobilize the Romanian community in the greater Seattle area.

This year’s nuanced edition celebrates the rich cultural fabric of Romania, while exploring current topics with the unflinchingly honest perspectives that fans of the festival have come to expect from Romanian cinema. The program will comprise of critically-acclaimed films and newly released films, and featuring special guests from Romania.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Wa Na Wari
Seattle, WA

We are very excited to announce that the first graduating cohort of our Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute is ready to share their work with the world. They have spent the last year creating art from the oral histories they recorded, and the upcoming exhibit at Wa Na Wari is the culmination of that work. We invite you to join us for the opening of this exhibit:
“Honored to Tell”: An exhibit of art and oral histories created by the first cohort to graduate from the Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute
Featured artists: Brenetta Ward, Akoiya Harris, Ariel Paine, Sierra Parsons, Ricky Reyes, Nia Amina Minor, Brea Wilson, Eboni Wyatt
Art Opening & Reception: Saturday, November 4, 2023, from 6-8pm
6:30pm Hear from the artists
7:00pm Dance performance by Akoiya Harris and Nia Amina Minor
At Wa Na Wari, 911 24th Ave. in Seattle’s historic Central District
Refreshments provided
Listen to the stories of Black waterfront workers, Black educators, Black barbers and beauticians, and Black dancers; stories that the artists have incorporated into textile art, dance, film, zines, listening stations, and more.
The exhibit will be on view until January 20, 2024.
More info at https://www.wanawari.org/sbshi_show

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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Portland, WA

Black Magic, a creation of Safari Productions, is a BIPOC drag show hosted here at CC Slaughters on the second Saturday of each month.
Featuring drag and live performances from amazing artist in the community. Hosted by Devlin Lynn Phoenixx and CoCo Jem Holiday.

Cash cover at door (100% to the talent)
21+ event

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Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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THE ALASKA FOOD POLICY COUNCIL, ALASKA FARM BUREAU, AND WESTERN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH & EDUCATION ARE PARTNERING FOR THE 7TH SESQUIANNUAL ALASKA FOOD FESTIVAL & CONFERENCE, IN COMBINATION WITH THE ALASKA FARM CONVENTION & TRADESHOW.
Alaska Farm Bureau supports, educates, and advocates for Alaska Agriculture, helping build and grow farmers and ranchers across Alaska. Alaska Farm Bureau is the largest agriculture-related organization in the State of Alaska. We are here to support Alaska growers regardless of the product grown or method of production. Alaska agriculture affects us all.
Alaska Food Policy Council’s goal is to create a healthier, more secure, and more self-reliant Alaska by improving our food system. The AFPC is open to anyone interested in improving Alaska’s food systems – agencies and individuals representing federal and state agencies, tribal entities, schools, university programs, farmers, fisheries, and food systems businesses.
Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) mission is to advance innovations that improve profitability, stewardship, and quality of life in American agriculture by investing in groundbreaking research and education. To achieve that, Western SARE believes that our programs must include the involvement of agricultural producers from inception to finish, and therefore we require producer involvement in the planning, design, implementation, and educational outreach of any funded project.
AFPC’S GOALS FOR THE CONFERENCE
AND FESTIVAL ARE TO:
(1) increase awareness of Alaska food issues among the general population;
(2) provide training, resources, and networking opportunities to increase involvement in local food issues by community members and decision-makers; and
3) increase connections and build community between the public, Alaska food businesses, NGOs, governmental entities, Tribal entities, and others to support local economic development and innovative solutions.
*Please note that the content and views presented during this event do not necessarily represent those of the Alaska Food Policy Council or our partners. As a non-partisan, non-profit organization, we seek a broad presentation of viewpoints and participation.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

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Lan Su Chinese Garden
Portland, OR

We’re celebrating the beauty and cultural significance of chrysanthemums throughout November, in perfect harmony with the traditional Chinese Double Ninth Festival. These exquisite flowers hold a rich and storied history in Chinese culture, symbolizing traits such as longevity, nobility, and endurance.

Join us for a series of horticultural programs centered around chrysanthemums, paying tribute to their illustrious heritage. This includes the return of our enchanting nighttime floral designer showcase, “Nights of the Golden Flower.” You can also partake in enlightening plant walks and witness insightful cultivation demonstrations, all designed to deepen your appreciation for this cherished bloom and its profound role in Chinese heritage.

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Thanks to the popularity of the instantly recognizable Great Wave—cited everywhere from book covers and Lego sets to anime and emoji— Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) has become one of the most famous and influential artists in the world. This major exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), takes a new approach to the work of the versatile master, pairing more than 100 of his woodblock prints, paintings, and illustrated books from the MFA’s renowned collection with more than 200 works by his teachers, students, rivals, and admirers. Join us to explore Hokusai’s impact through the centuries and around the globe, on artists including Yoshitomo Nara, Chiho Aoshima, and Helen Frankenthaler.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Check one, two, three 🎤 “Sound Check! The Music We Make”, is a new exhibit at Wing Luke Museum on view from Sunday October 15, 2023 until September 14, 2024 🎧🎶💿🎹

Sound Check! celebrates the role of music in the lives of AANHPI communities. Dive into community-based stories as well as the experiences of AANHPI professionals in the music industry. Audiophiles and historians will be able to browse archival materials, photos, and artworks while also indulging in interactive audio-visual installations.

Featured artists include Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto of Soundgarden; singer-songwriter Carly Ann Calbero; jazz drummer Akira Tana; musician Roger Rigor; hip hop artist Geo Quibuyen of Blue Scholars and many more.


Don’t forget about the perks of becoming a Museum Member like unlimited free general admission and opportunities to see exhibits first at special Museum Member Receptions!

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Advance Native Political Leadership
Anchorage, AK

Exciting Announcement! Alaska, home to the largest Native population share in the nation, is taking a powerful step towards amplifying Native voices in elected office. Did you know that out of the 178,000+ Native people residing in the state, only 58 currently hold elected positions?

Joining forces with @nativepeoplesaction, the #NativeLeadershipInstitute will be empowering Native leaders in Alaska to run for office – and win! Despite representing at least 24.4% of the population, Native peoples hold a mere 3% of elected offices in our great state.

📢 We’re thrilled to announce our first in-person training class in Alaska scheduled for November 8-12, 2023. This first-of-its kind program will equip Native leaders in Alaska with the skills, knowledge, and support they need to make a significant impact in the political landscape.

Are you ready to make history? Join us for this transformative training, and help reshape Native representation in Alaska’s elected offices. Together, let’s weave the threads of our ancestral teachings into the fabric of Alaska’s political landscape, fostering inclusivity, environmental stewardship, and cultural preservation for generations to come!

To learn more about the #NativeLeadershipInstitute and start your application, click on the link in our bio.

This training is offered at no cost to participants. Transportation, accommodation, and meals will be provided by Advance Native Political Leadership Action Fund.

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Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement (STALM)
, WA
The Tribe’s Environmental and Natural Resources Team has been hard at work planning some fantastic upcoming restoration projects on Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands that you can contribute to! What better way to help redefine recreation by building reciprocity with the lands – while also enjoying all the benefits of being outside in community (both human and ecological)? Here’s the link to more from the ENR team about each event and the RSVP links! https://enr.snoqualmietribe.us/events/
Can’t make it? Stay tuned for additional opportunities!
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This exhibit showcases the work of folx who are part of the SWANA (Southwest Asia and North Africa) stitching community. The works encompass diasporic, immigrant, mixed, and queer stitches in a contemporary context with an ancestral throughline across time and space, oceans, continents, languages and mediums. The textile works range from Palestinian Tatreez embroidery and Egyptian Khayamiya appliqué to Armenian Janyak needlelace and many other regional stitches. Additionally, there will be new works drawing from multiple artistic disciplines, both ancient and modern, including writing, multimedia, propaganda, visual and plastic art, and inter-and-multi-disciplinary works. The event will include presentations by the artists and other cultural programming as well. And of course all SWANA events include food, music and dance.

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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Rhythms of India
Bellevue, WA

East Shore will be joined by Bhangra dance group Rhythms of India to help us celebrate Diwali in style! We will learn dance moves and put them together in a fun and exuberant service that is part storytelling, part dance workshop, part musical exploration.

In-Person and Virtual
In person services are followed by coffee hour.

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This exhibit features the work of Skokomish artists Denise Emerson and Hailey Brown. Inspired by their shared background as Skokomish tribal members, the exhibit is an exploration and conversation across generations and mediums. The artworks represent the hearts and minds of their makers and the endurance and transformation of what it means to be Skokomish.

In community with arnaq, hana’ack, smɁem, Creation Story celebrates indigenous women and their stories. With this exhibit, Columbia City Gallery continues the growing movement to support the art and culture of Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. Curated by Lena Ishel Rodriguez, proud Mexican of Nahua descent in her solo curatorial debut. Previously Lena contributed to Cosmic Beings in Mesoamerican and Andean Art at Seattle Art Museum, and Inside the Mask at the Hammer Museum.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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“Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” brings together the artwork of Eugene Landry (1937-1988) with contemporary Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe artists and writers as they explore their cultural roots, tribal identity, and connection to ancestral land. Landry’s artwork offers a look at the political, economic, and cultural challenges the tribe faced during his lifetime—from near termination to federal recognition. Paralyzed by illness as a young man, Landry created his art from a wheelchair, using his non- dominant hand. Conversations with his former portrait models (now tribal elders), reveal his creative resilience and the positive impact he had in their young lives. Now, 35 years after Landry’s passing, a rediscovered collection of Landry’s art inspires a new generation of Shoalwater Bay artists. “Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” will be on view at Astoria Visual Arts November 11 through December 2.

Nov 11, 5:00pm at AVA:
Artist talk/reading with curator Judith Altruda

Dec 2, 1:00pm at AVA:
Contemporary Shoalwater Bay Artists’ Panel Discussion

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Hindi Time Kids
Seattle, WA

Celebrate with us! Burke Museum education partner Hindi Time Kids has planned an exciting all-ages event to teach visitors about the meaning and traditions of Diwali, a South Asian annual festival of lights celebrated in many parts of the world. The word ‘Diwali’ derives from Sanskrit language and means “a row of lights.” Diwali is a time for gathering with loved ones, celebrating life, and enjoying illumination of lights in the form of candles, kandil (lanterns), diya (clay lamps) and fireworks.

Activities include:
– Clay diya painting and decorations
– Wooden diya stencils and diya foam stickers to make Diwali cards
– Story time for children in Hindi about Diwali
– Taste Diwali food and sweets

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to announce that we have teamed up with the City of Shoreline and the Spartan Recreation Center to host the Arte de la Raza exhibition running Nov.2nd-Jan. 24th and featuring:
Che Lopez
Iris Sanchez
Jake Prendez
Rolando Avila
Teresa Martinez
Yessica Marquez
The exhibition opens Nov. 2nd which is also the same day as their Dia de los Muertos Festival!!

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Our Feast of the Dead location has been updated! (THIS IS A CLOSED EVENT FOR CHOCTAW/SOUTHEASTERN ONLY) Mark your calendars! Like CNO, we too will start celebrating Feast of the Dead up here in our community. Traditionally Choctaw ancestors would celebrate feast of the dead during what is now known as November. For more info on the practice, check out the November 2020 Iti Fabvssa article. If you’re Choctaw or southeastern living in the pnw and want to join us, give us a DM. #choctaw #feastofthedead

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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The day following Diwali is traditionally celebrated with the Annakut – literally meaning, a mountain of food. Every year thousands of vegetarian delicacies are offered in devotional gratitude for the past year and to seek blessings for the year ahead. The Annakut offering includes snacks, sweets, pickles, spicy dishes, salads, fruit drinks and other items devotionally prepared by devotees. We cordially invite you for darshan of the Annakut with family and friends.

  • Nov 11th: Family Diwali Annakut
    • 12:00 PM – 7:00 PM
  • Nov 12th: Sharda Chopda Pujan (Diwali)
    • 6:00 PM
  • Nov 14th: New Year
    • Aarti: 7:00 AM, 11:30AM, 6:45PM
    • Mandir Darshan: 7:00 AM Onwards
  • Nov 18th: Kids Diwali Celebration
    • 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM
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Uprise Collective
Hybrid

We are thrilled to announce our sixth annual Selah Storytelling Series! This year we will have amazing storytellers share stories of Creation, Resistance, and Healing in a hybrid space both in person and on zoom!
Stay tuned to learn about our storytellers, the location, and this years Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thankstaking celebration!
Access:
In person: ADA space with ADA bathrooms. Masks required. More details to come on parking and seating.
On-line: ASL and CART provided.
Details:
In its sixth year, the Selah Series provides a BIPOC-centered storytelling space for community members to share the fruits of their ancestors’ wisdom, resistance, and survivance, and an opportunity for all of us to build community that is reflective of our collective strength.
Creation Stories
November 2, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will be sharing stories of the creation of the Earth and the universe that come from indigenous cultural histories. From the Turtle Continent to the Popol Vuh to Mawu the Moon Being, this event is about reclaiming how the world was made.
Resistance Stories
November 9, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will share stories of protest, organizing, collective bargaining, and community care. What can we learn from those that came before us? What tactics are we using now to reimagine systems? The road map to social uplift has been written, and written well.
Healing Stories:
November 16, 2022, 6:00pm-8:00pm PST
How do we practice care in our communities outside of Western, capitalist, white supremacist models? The focus of this event will be on the holistic, indigenous, decolonized wellness that targeted communities use to engage in healing. From naturopathy to indigenous herbalism to healing tones, the focus of the event is to honor ancestral knowledge and our special knack for survival.
We also have a culminating meal-share event on Saturday, November 25th, Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thanks-taking. We’ll eat, build community, and BIPOC performers will share their gifts.

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Chinmaya Mission Seattle
Kirkland, WA

Chinmaya Mission Seattle is very delighted to host a Diwali Mela filled with fun activities and food. The event is free and open for all, but please do register.

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s'gʷi gʷi ʔ altxʷ House of Welcome / Evergreen Longhouse
Olympia, WA

This show is dedicated to Veterans, past and present and will be held at the Evergreen Gallery from October 16 – December 30, 2023. There will be a Grand Opening on Thursday, October 19 from 3 – 6 pm.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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American Romanian Cultural Society - ARCS Project
Seattle , WA

The Romanian Film Festival Seattle is excited to celebrate its 10th anniversary edition this year. Running Nov. 4-12, the festival will mark the return to SIFF Uptown Cinema Nov. 4-5 (its home until 2019), and will continue the following weekend at Northwest Film Forum. Not in Seattle? We’ll have a great selection of films online as well!

Started in 2014 with the scope of bringing Romanian cinema to audiences in Seattle, the festival has adapted and blossomed over the years. It soldiered through the pandemic, thanks to a loyal audience that followed it as it transformed to a virtual program. This year it continues to enjoy a hybrid format, with an online selection available in the continental US and in-person screenings at SIFF Cinema Uptown and Northwest Film Forum.

Through the years, each edition has brought thought-provoking and award-winning productions from Romania and Eastern Europe, giving a platform to upcoming and established directors alike.

This year’s theme “One Eye Laughing, One Eye Crying” is a nod to its first edition in 2014 – the duality of the Romanian spirit that propels it forward in spite of constant hardships. The first year saw an overwhelming success following a grassroots effort to mobilize the Romanian community in the greater Seattle area.

This year’s nuanced edition celebrates the rich cultural fabric of Romania, while exploring current topics with the unflinchingly honest perspectives that fans of the festival have come to expect from Romanian cinema. The program will comprise of critically-acclaimed films and newly released films, and featuring special guests from Romania.

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Salish School of Spokane
Spokane, WA
Krishna Cultural Center
Boise, ID

DIWALI – FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS, COME LIGHT A CANDLE FOR PEACE, TRADITIONAL INDIAN DANCE, DRAMAS AND KIRTAN, COME WITH YOUR FAMILY TO CELEBRATE THIS GRAND FESTIVAL, FREE VEGETARIAN MEAL FOR ALL.

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Wa Na Wari
Seattle, WA

We are very excited to announce that the first graduating cohort of our Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute is ready to share their work with the world. They have spent the last year creating art from the oral histories they recorded, and the upcoming exhibit at Wa Na Wari is the culmination of that work. We invite you to join us for the opening of this exhibit:
“Honored to Tell”: An exhibit of art and oral histories created by the first cohort to graduate from the Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute
Featured artists: Brenetta Ward, Akoiya Harris, Ariel Paine, Sierra Parsons, Ricky Reyes, Nia Amina Minor, Brea Wilson, Eboni Wyatt
Art Opening & Reception: Saturday, November 4, 2023, from 6-8pm
6:30pm Hear from the artists
7:00pm Dance performance by Akoiya Harris and Nia Amina Minor
At Wa Na Wari, 911 24th Ave. in Seattle’s historic Central District
Refreshments provided
Listen to the stories of Black waterfront workers, Black educators, Black barbers and beauticians, and Black dancers; stories that the artists have incorporated into textile art, dance, film, zines, listening stations, and more.
The exhibit will be on view until January 20, 2024.
More info at https://www.wanawari.org/sbshi_show

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Experience Northern Quests first-ever tribal fashion show! Native designers will showcase their unique styles on local models representing surrounding tribes. DJ Exodus will provide music and hors d’oeuvres will be served.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

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Lan Su Chinese Garden
Portland, OR

We’re celebrating the beauty and cultural significance of chrysanthemums throughout November, in perfect harmony with the traditional Chinese Double Ninth Festival. These exquisite flowers hold a rich and storied history in Chinese culture, symbolizing traits such as longevity, nobility, and endurance.

Join us for a series of horticultural programs centered around chrysanthemums, paying tribute to their illustrious heritage. This includes the return of our enchanting nighttime floral designer showcase, “Nights of the Golden Flower.” You can also partake in enlightening plant walks and witness insightful cultivation demonstrations, all designed to deepen your appreciation for this cherished bloom and its profound role in Chinese heritage.

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Thanks to the popularity of the instantly recognizable Great Wave—cited everywhere from book covers and Lego sets to anime and emoji— Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) has become one of the most famous and influential artists in the world. This major exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), takes a new approach to the work of the versatile master, pairing more than 100 of his woodblock prints, paintings, and illustrated books from the MFA’s renowned collection with more than 200 works by his teachers, students, rivals, and admirers. Join us to explore Hokusai’s impact through the centuries and around the globe, on artists including Yoshitomo Nara, Chiho Aoshima, and Helen Frankenthaler.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Check one, two, three 🎤 “Sound Check! The Music We Make”, is a new exhibit at Wing Luke Museum on view from Sunday October 15, 2023 until September 14, 2024 🎧🎶💿🎹

Sound Check! celebrates the role of music in the lives of AANHPI communities. Dive into community-based stories as well as the experiences of AANHPI professionals in the music industry. Audiophiles and historians will be able to browse archival materials, photos, and artworks while also indulging in interactive audio-visual installations.

Featured artists include Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto of Soundgarden; singer-songwriter Carly Ann Calbero; jazz drummer Akira Tana; musician Roger Rigor; hip hop artist Geo Quibuyen of Blue Scholars and many more.


Don’t forget about the perks of becoming a Museum Member like unlimited free general admission and opportunities to see exhibits first at special Museum Member Receptions!

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Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement (STALM)
, WA
The Tribe’s Environmental and Natural Resources Team has been hard at work planning some fantastic upcoming restoration projects on Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands that you can contribute to! What better way to help redefine recreation by building reciprocity with the lands – while also enjoying all the benefits of being outside in community (both human and ecological)? Here’s the link to more from the ENR team about each event and the RSVP links! https://enr.snoqualmietribe.us/events/
Can’t make it? Stay tuned for additional opportunities!
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This exhibit showcases the work of folx who are part of the SWANA (Southwest Asia and North Africa) stitching community. The works encompass diasporic, immigrant, mixed, and queer stitches in a contemporary context with an ancestral throughline across time and space, oceans, continents, languages and mediums. The textile works range from Palestinian Tatreez embroidery and Egyptian Khayamiya appliqué to Armenian Janyak needlelace and many other regional stitches. Additionally, there will be new works drawing from multiple artistic disciplines, both ancient and modern, including writing, multimedia, propaganda, visual and plastic art, and inter-and-multi-disciplinary works. The event will include presentations by the artists and other cultural programming as well. And of course all SWANA events include food, music and dance.

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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“Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” brings together the artwork of Eugene Landry (1937-1988) with contemporary Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe artists and writers as they explore their cultural roots, tribal identity, and connection to ancestral land. Landry’s artwork offers a look at the political, economic, and cultural challenges the tribe faced during his lifetime—from near termination to federal recognition. Paralyzed by illness as a young man, Landry created his art from a wheelchair, using his non- dominant hand. Conversations with his former portrait models (now tribal elders), reveal his creative resilience and the positive impact he had in their young lives. Now, 35 years after Landry’s passing, a rediscovered collection of Landry’s art inspires a new generation of Shoalwater Bay artists. “Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” will be on view at Astoria Visual Arts November 11 through December 2.

Nov 11, 5:00pm at AVA:
Artist talk/reading with curator Judith Altruda

Dec 2, 1:00pm at AVA:
Contemporary Shoalwater Bay Artists’ Panel Discussion

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to announce that we have teamed up with the City of Shoreline and the Spartan Recreation Center to host the Arte de la Raza exhibition running Nov.2nd-Jan. 24th and featuring:
Che Lopez
Iris Sanchez
Jake Prendez
Rolando Avila
Teresa Martinez
Yessica Marquez
The exhibition opens Nov. 2nd which is also the same day as their Dia de los Muertos Festival!!

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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The day following Diwali is traditionally celebrated with the Annakut – literally meaning, a mountain of food. Every year thousands of vegetarian delicacies are offered in devotional gratitude for the past year and to seek blessings for the year ahead. The Annakut offering includes snacks, sweets, pickles, spicy dishes, salads, fruit drinks and other items devotionally prepared by devotees. We cordially invite you for darshan of the Annakut with family and friends.

  • Nov 11th: Family Diwali Annakut
    • 12:00 PM – 7:00 PM
  • Nov 12th: Sharda Chopda Pujan (Diwali)
    • 6:00 PM
  • Nov 14th: New Year
    • Aarti: 7:00 AM, 11:30AM, 6:45PM
    • Mandir Darshan: 7:00 AM Onwards
  • Nov 18th: Kids Diwali Celebration
    • 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM
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Uprise Collective
Hybrid

We are thrilled to announce our sixth annual Selah Storytelling Series! This year we will have amazing storytellers share stories of Creation, Resistance, and Healing in a hybrid space both in person and on zoom!
Stay tuned to learn about our storytellers, the location, and this years Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thankstaking celebration!
Access:
In person: ADA space with ADA bathrooms. Masks required. More details to come on parking and seating.
On-line: ASL and CART provided.
Details:
In its sixth year, the Selah Series provides a BIPOC-centered storytelling space for community members to share the fruits of their ancestors’ wisdom, resistance, and survivance, and an opportunity for all of us to build community that is reflective of our collective strength.
Creation Stories
November 2, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will be sharing stories of the creation of the Earth and the universe that come from indigenous cultural histories. From the Turtle Continent to the Popol Vuh to Mawu the Moon Being, this event is about reclaiming how the world was made.
Resistance Stories
November 9, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will share stories of protest, organizing, collective bargaining, and community care. What can we learn from those that came before us? What tactics are we using now to reimagine systems? The road map to social uplift has been written, and written well.
Healing Stories:
November 16, 2022, 6:00pm-8:00pm PST
How do we practice care in our communities outside of Western, capitalist, white supremacist models? The focus of this event will be on the holistic, indigenous, decolonized wellness that targeted communities use to engage in healing. From naturopathy to indigenous herbalism to healing tones, the focus of the event is to honor ancestral knowledge and our special knack for survival.
We also have a culminating meal-share event on Saturday, November 25th, Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thanks-taking. We’ll eat, build community, and BIPOC performers will share their gifts.

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s'gʷi gʷi ʔ altxʷ House of Welcome / Evergreen Longhouse
Olympia, WA

This show is dedicated to Veterans, past and present and will be held at the Evergreen Gallery from October 16 – December 30, 2023. There will be a Grand Opening on Thursday, October 19 from 3 – 6 pm.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Wa Na Wari
Seattle, WA

We are very excited to announce that the first graduating cohort of our Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute is ready to share their work with the world. They have spent the last year creating art from the oral histories they recorded, and the upcoming exhibit at Wa Na Wari is the culmination of that work. We invite you to join us for the opening of this exhibit:
“Honored to Tell”: An exhibit of art and oral histories created by the first cohort to graduate from the Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute
Featured artists: Brenetta Ward, Akoiya Harris, Ariel Paine, Sierra Parsons, Ricky Reyes, Nia Amina Minor, Brea Wilson, Eboni Wyatt
Art Opening & Reception: Saturday, November 4, 2023, from 6-8pm
6:30pm Hear from the artists
7:00pm Dance performance by Akoiya Harris and Nia Amina Minor
At Wa Na Wari, 911 24th Ave. in Seattle’s historic Central District
Refreshments provided
Listen to the stories of Black waterfront workers, Black educators, Black barbers and beauticians, and Black dancers; stories that the artists have incorporated into textile art, dance, film, zines, listening stations, and more.
The exhibit will be on view until January 20, 2024.
More info at https://www.wanawari.org/sbshi_show

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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Join us for the live recording of Portland comic Lee H. Tillman’s stand-up comedy special Bad At Math, filmed on location in the Ellyn Bye Studio at Portland Center Stage.
Lee H. Tillman has a low-key delivery, but please don’t mistake his laid-back delivery for complacency. There are surprises at every turn. In addition to headlining comedy clubs all over the Pacific Northwest, he also performs at comedy shows and festivals throughout the United States and now he’ll be recording his first-ever comedy special.

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Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

View Event
Lan Su Chinese Garden
Portland, OR

We’re celebrating the beauty and cultural significance of chrysanthemums throughout November, in perfect harmony with the traditional Chinese Double Ninth Festival. These exquisite flowers hold a rich and storied history in Chinese culture, symbolizing traits such as longevity, nobility, and endurance.

Join us for a series of horticultural programs centered around chrysanthemums, paying tribute to their illustrious heritage. This includes the return of our enchanting nighttime floral designer showcase, “Nights of the Golden Flower.” You can also partake in enlightening plant walks and witness insightful cultivation demonstrations, all designed to deepen your appreciation for this cherished bloom and its profound role in Chinese heritage.

View Event

Thanks to the popularity of the instantly recognizable Great Wave—cited everywhere from book covers and Lego sets to anime and emoji— Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) has become one of the most famous and influential artists in the world. This major exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), takes a new approach to the work of the versatile master, pairing more than 100 of his woodblock prints, paintings, and illustrated books from the MFA’s renowned collection with more than 200 works by his teachers, students, rivals, and admirers. Join us to explore Hokusai’s impact through the centuries and around the globe, on artists including Yoshitomo Nara, Chiho Aoshima, and Helen Frankenthaler.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Check one, two, three 🎤 “Sound Check! The Music We Make”, is a new exhibit at Wing Luke Museum on view from Sunday October 15, 2023 until September 14, 2024 🎧🎶💿🎹

Sound Check! celebrates the role of music in the lives of AANHPI communities. Dive into community-based stories as well as the experiences of AANHPI professionals in the music industry. Audiophiles and historians will be able to browse archival materials, photos, and artworks while also indulging in interactive audio-visual installations.

Featured artists include Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto of Soundgarden; singer-songwriter Carly Ann Calbero; jazz drummer Akira Tana; musician Roger Rigor; hip hop artist Geo Quibuyen of Blue Scholars and many more.


Don’t forget about the perks of becoming a Museum Member like unlimited free general admission and opportunities to see exhibits first at special Museum Member Receptions!

View Event
Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement (STALM)
, WA
The Tribe’s Environmental and Natural Resources Team has been hard at work planning some fantastic upcoming restoration projects on Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands that you can contribute to! What better way to help redefine recreation by building reciprocity with the lands – while also enjoying all the benefits of being outside in community (both human and ecological)? Here’s the link to more from the ENR team about each event and the RSVP links! https://enr.snoqualmietribe.us/events/
Can’t make it? Stay tuned for additional opportunities!
View Event

This exhibit showcases the work of folx who are part of the SWANA (Southwest Asia and North Africa) stitching community. The works encompass diasporic, immigrant, mixed, and queer stitches in a contemporary context with an ancestral throughline across time and space, oceans, continents, languages and mediums. The textile works range from Palestinian Tatreez embroidery and Egyptian Khayamiya appliqué to Armenian Janyak needlelace and many other regional stitches. Additionally, there will be new works drawing from multiple artistic disciplines, both ancient and modern, including writing, multimedia, propaganda, visual and plastic art, and inter-and-multi-disciplinary works. The event will include presentations by the artists and other cultural programming as well. And of course all SWANA events include food, music and dance.

View Event

Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

View Event
Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

View Event

I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

View Event

“Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” brings together the artwork of Eugene Landry (1937-1988) with contemporary Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe artists and writers as they explore their cultural roots, tribal identity, and connection to ancestral land. Landry’s artwork offers a look at the political, economic, and cultural challenges the tribe faced during his lifetime—from near termination to federal recognition. Paralyzed by illness as a young man, Landry created his art from a wheelchair, using his non- dominant hand. Conversations with his former portrait models (now tribal elders), reveal his creative resilience and the positive impact he had in their young lives. Now, 35 years after Landry’s passing, a rediscovered collection of Landry’s art inspires a new generation of Shoalwater Bay artists. “Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” will be on view at Astoria Visual Arts November 11 through December 2.

Nov 11, 5:00pm at AVA:
Artist talk/reading with curator Judith Altruda

Dec 2, 1:00pm at AVA:
Contemporary Shoalwater Bay Artists’ Panel Discussion

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to announce that we have teamed up with the City of Shoreline and the Spartan Recreation Center to host the Arte de la Raza exhibition running Nov.2nd-Jan. 24th and featuring:
Che Lopez
Iris Sanchez
Jake Prendez
Rolando Avila
Teresa Martinez
Yessica Marquez
The exhibition opens Nov. 2nd which is also the same day as their Dia de los Muertos Festival!!

View Event

An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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The day following Diwali is traditionally celebrated with the Annakut – literally meaning, a mountain of food. Every year thousands of vegetarian delicacies are offered in devotional gratitude for the past year and to seek blessings for the year ahead. The Annakut offering includes snacks, sweets, pickles, spicy dishes, salads, fruit drinks and other items devotionally prepared by devotees. We cordially invite you for darshan of the Annakut with family and friends.

  • Nov 11th: Family Diwali Annakut
    • 12:00 PM – 7:00 PM
  • Nov 12th: Sharda Chopda Pujan (Diwali)
    • 6:00 PM
  • Nov 14th: New Year
    • Aarti: 7:00 AM, 11:30AM, 6:45PM
    • Mandir Darshan: 7:00 AM Onwards
  • Nov 18th: Kids Diwali Celebration
    • 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM
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Urban League of Portland
Salem & Portland, OR

This year Urban League of Portland’s Feed the Folks coming to Salem AND Portland in the same week. Both events will be DRIVE-THRU and Walk-Up, meaning during event times, after you’ve checked in, you are welcome to drive your vehicle right up to Urban League staff and we’ll load your meals into your car.
No vehicle? No problem! Folks without transportation can still attend the event and pick up items in a wagon or cart if they are able.

Salem Feed the Folks will be on November 14th from 12pm – 3pm, at the ARCHES Lodge: 1875 Fisher Rd NE, Salem, OR 97305.

Portland Feed the Folks will be on November 16th from 12pm – 3pm at the Urban League of Portland Building: 10 N Russell St, Portland, OR 97227

REGISTER to attend and receive a FREE Holiday Meal Kit. They will also have limited outreach supplies available at each of these events.

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Uprise Collective
Hybrid

We are thrilled to announce our sixth annual Selah Storytelling Series! This year we will have amazing storytellers share stories of Creation, Resistance, and Healing in a hybrid space both in person and on zoom!
Stay tuned to learn about our storytellers, the location, and this years Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thankstaking celebration!
Access:
In person: ADA space with ADA bathrooms. Masks required. More details to come on parking and seating.
On-line: ASL and CART provided.
Details:
In its sixth year, the Selah Series provides a BIPOC-centered storytelling space for community members to share the fruits of their ancestors’ wisdom, resistance, and survivance, and an opportunity for all of us to build community that is reflective of our collective strength.
Creation Stories
November 2, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will be sharing stories of the creation of the Earth and the universe that come from indigenous cultural histories. From the Turtle Continent to the Popol Vuh to Mawu the Moon Being, this event is about reclaiming how the world was made.
Resistance Stories
November 9, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will share stories of protest, organizing, collective bargaining, and community care. What can we learn from those that came before us? What tactics are we using now to reimagine systems? The road map to social uplift has been written, and written well.
Healing Stories:
November 16, 2022, 6:00pm-8:00pm PST
How do we practice care in our communities outside of Western, capitalist, white supremacist models? The focus of this event will be on the holistic, indigenous, decolonized wellness that targeted communities use to engage in healing. From naturopathy to indigenous herbalism to healing tones, the focus of the event is to honor ancestral knowledge and our special knack for survival.
We also have a culminating meal-share event on Saturday, November 25th, Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thanks-taking. We’ll eat, build community, and BIPOC performers will share their gifts.

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s'gʷi gʷi ʔ altxʷ House of Welcome / Evergreen Longhouse
Olympia, WA

This show is dedicated to Veterans, past and present and will be held at the Evergreen Gallery from October 16 – December 30, 2023. There will be a Grand Opening on Thursday, October 19 from 3 – 6 pm.

View Event
Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Wa Na Wari
Seattle, WA

We are very excited to announce that the first graduating cohort of our Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute is ready to share their work with the world. They have spent the last year creating art from the oral histories they recorded, and the upcoming exhibit at Wa Na Wari is the culmination of that work. We invite you to join us for the opening of this exhibit:
“Honored to Tell”: An exhibit of art and oral histories created by the first cohort to graduate from the Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute
Featured artists: Brenetta Ward, Akoiya Harris, Ariel Paine, Sierra Parsons, Ricky Reyes, Nia Amina Minor, Brea Wilson, Eboni Wyatt
Art Opening & Reception: Saturday, November 4, 2023, from 6-8pm
6:30pm Hear from the artists
7:00pm Dance performance by Akoiya Harris and Nia Amina Minor
At Wa Na Wari, 911 24th Ave. in Seattle’s historic Central District
Refreshments provided
Listen to the stories of Black waterfront workers, Black educators, Black barbers and beauticians, and Black dancers; stories that the artists have incorporated into textile art, dance, film, zines, listening stations, and more.
The exhibit will be on view until January 20, 2024.
More info at https://www.wanawari.org/sbshi_show

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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Event
Organization
Location
yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

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Lan Su Chinese Garden
Portland, OR

We’re celebrating the beauty and cultural significance of chrysanthemums throughout November, in perfect harmony with the traditional Chinese Double Ninth Festival. These exquisite flowers hold a rich and storied history in Chinese culture, symbolizing traits such as longevity, nobility, and endurance.

Join us for a series of horticultural programs centered around chrysanthemums, paying tribute to their illustrious heritage. This includes the return of our enchanting nighttime floral designer showcase, “Nights of the Golden Flower.” You can also partake in enlightening plant walks and witness insightful cultivation demonstrations, all designed to deepen your appreciation for this cherished bloom and its profound role in Chinese heritage.

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Thanks to the popularity of the instantly recognizable Great Wave—cited everywhere from book covers and Lego sets to anime and emoji— Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) has become one of the most famous and influential artists in the world. This major exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), takes a new approach to the work of the versatile master, pairing more than 100 of his woodblock prints, paintings, and illustrated books from the MFA’s renowned collection with more than 200 works by his teachers, students, rivals, and admirers. Join us to explore Hokusai’s impact through the centuries and around the globe, on artists including Yoshitomo Nara, Chiho Aoshima, and Helen Frankenthaler.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Check one, two, three 🎤 “Sound Check! The Music We Make”, is a new exhibit at Wing Luke Museum on view from Sunday October 15, 2023 until September 14, 2024 🎧🎶💿🎹

Sound Check! celebrates the role of music in the lives of AANHPI communities. Dive into community-based stories as well as the experiences of AANHPI professionals in the music industry. Audiophiles and historians will be able to browse archival materials, photos, and artworks while also indulging in interactive audio-visual installations.

Featured artists include Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto of Soundgarden; singer-songwriter Carly Ann Calbero; jazz drummer Akira Tana; musician Roger Rigor; hip hop artist Geo Quibuyen of Blue Scholars and many more.


Don’t forget about the perks of becoming a Museum Member like unlimited free general admission and opportunities to see exhibits first at special Museum Member Receptions!

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Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement (STALM)
, WA
The Tribe’s Environmental and Natural Resources Team has been hard at work planning some fantastic upcoming restoration projects on Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands that you can contribute to! What better way to help redefine recreation by building reciprocity with the lands – while also enjoying all the benefits of being outside in community (both human and ecological)? Here’s the link to more from the ENR team about each event and the RSVP links! https://enr.snoqualmietribe.us/events/
Can’t make it? Stay tuned for additional opportunities!
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This exhibit showcases the work of folx who are part of the SWANA (Southwest Asia and North Africa) stitching community. The works encompass diasporic, immigrant, mixed, and queer stitches in a contemporary context with an ancestral throughline across time and space, oceans, continents, languages and mediums. The textile works range from Palestinian Tatreez embroidery and Egyptian Khayamiya appliqué to Armenian Janyak needlelace and many other regional stitches. Additionally, there will be new works drawing from multiple artistic disciplines, both ancient and modern, including writing, multimedia, propaganda, visual and plastic art, and inter-and-multi-disciplinary works. The event will include presentations by the artists and other cultural programming as well. And of course all SWANA events include food, music and dance.

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

View Event

“Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” brings together the artwork of Eugene Landry (1937-1988) with contemporary Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe artists and writers as they explore their cultural roots, tribal identity, and connection to ancestral land. Landry’s artwork offers a look at the political, economic, and cultural challenges the tribe faced during his lifetime—from near termination to federal recognition. Paralyzed by illness as a young man, Landry created his art from a wheelchair, using his non- dominant hand. Conversations with his former portrait models (now tribal elders), reveal his creative resilience and the positive impact he had in their young lives. Now, 35 years after Landry’s passing, a rediscovered collection of Landry’s art inspires a new generation of Shoalwater Bay artists. “Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” will be on view at Astoria Visual Arts November 11 through December 2.

Nov 11, 5:00pm at AVA:
Artist talk/reading with curator Judith Altruda

Dec 2, 1:00pm at AVA:
Contemporary Shoalwater Bay Artists’ Panel Discussion

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to announce that we have teamed up with the City of Shoreline and the Spartan Recreation Center to host the Arte de la Raza exhibition running Nov.2nd-Jan. 24th and featuring:
Che Lopez
Iris Sanchez
Jake Prendez
Rolando Avila
Teresa Martinez
Yessica Marquez
The exhibition opens Nov. 2nd which is also the same day as their Dia de los Muertos Festival!!

View Event

An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

View Event

The day following Diwali is traditionally celebrated with the Annakut – literally meaning, a mountain of food. Every year thousands of vegetarian delicacies are offered in devotional gratitude for the past year and to seek blessings for the year ahead. The Annakut offering includes snacks, sweets, pickles, spicy dishes, salads, fruit drinks and other items devotionally prepared by devotees. We cordially invite you for darshan of the Annakut with family and friends.

  • Nov 11th: Family Diwali Annakut
    • 12:00 PM – 7:00 PM
  • Nov 12th: Sharda Chopda Pujan (Diwali)
    • 6:00 PM
  • Nov 14th: New Year
    • Aarti: 7:00 AM, 11:30AM, 6:45PM
    • Mandir Darshan: 7:00 AM Onwards
  • Nov 18th: Kids Diwali Celebration
    • 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM
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Urban League of Portland
Salem & Portland, OR

This year Urban League of Portland’s Feed the Folks coming to Salem AND Portland in the same week. Both events will be DRIVE-THRU and Walk-Up, meaning during event times, after you’ve checked in, you are welcome to drive your vehicle right up to Urban League staff and we’ll load your meals into your car.
No vehicle? No problem! Folks without transportation can still attend the event and pick up items in a wagon or cart if they are able.

Salem Feed the Folks will be on November 14th from 12pm – 3pm, at the ARCHES Lodge: 1875 Fisher Rd NE, Salem, OR 97305.

Portland Feed the Folks will be on November 16th from 12pm – 3pm at the Urban League of Portland Building: 10 N Russell St, Portland, OR 97227

REGISTER to attend and receive a FREE Holiday Meal Kit. They will also have limited outreach supplies available at each of these events.

View Event
Uprise Collective
Hybrid

We are thrilled to announce our sixth annual Selah Storytelling Series! This year we will have amazing storytellers share stories of Creation, Resistance, and Healing in a hybrid space both in person and on zoom!
Stay tuned to learn about our storytellers, the location, and this years Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thankstaking celebration!
Access:
In person: ADA space with ADA bathrooms. Masks required. More details to come on parking and seating.
On-line: ASL and CART provided.
Details:
In its sixth year, the Selah Series provides a BIPOC-centered storytelling space for community members to share the fruits of their ancestors’ wisdom, resistance, and survivance, and an opportunity for all of us to build community that is reflective of our collective strength.
Creation Stories
November 2, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will be sharing stories of the creation of the Earth and the universe that come from indigenous cultural histories. From the Turtle Continent to the Popol Vuh to Mawu the Moon Being, this event is about reclaiming how the world was made.
Resistance Stories
November 9, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will share stories of protest, organizing, collective bargaining, and community care. What can we learn from those that came before us? What tactics are we using now to reimagine systems? The road map to social uplift has been written, and written well.
Healing Stories:
November 16, 2022, 6:00pm-8:00pm PST
How do we practice care in our communities outside of Western, capitalist, white supremacist models? The focus of this event will be on the holistic, indigenous, decolonized wellness that targeted communities use to engage in healing. From naturopathy to indigenous herbalism to healing tones, the focus of the event is to honor ancestral knowledge and our special knack for survival.
We also have a culminating meal-share event on Saturday, November 25th, Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thanks-taking. We’ll eat, build community, and BIPOC performers will share their gifts.

View Event

Boise International Short Film Festival is excited to announce that finalists have been selected! The festival will be November 15th and 16th at 2pm-8pm at the Boise State University SPEC Theater. Admission is free so bring your friends! Stay tuned for sneak peaks of the selected films, as well as ticket information as there will be limited seats available.

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s'gʷi gʷi ʔ altxʷ House of Welcome / Evergreen Longhouse
Olympia, WA

This show is dedicated to Veterans, past and present and will be held at the Evergreen Gallery from October 16 – December 30, 2023. There will be a Grand Opening on Thursday, October 19 from 3 – 6 pm.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Wa Na Wari
Seattle, WA

We are very excited to announce that the first graduating cohort of our Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute is ready to share their work with the world. They have spent the last year creating art from the oral histories they recorded, and the upcoming exhibit at Wa Na Wari is the culmination of that work. We invite you to join us for the opening of this exhibit:
“Honored to Tell”: An exhibit of art and oral histories created by the first cohort to graduate from the Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute
Featured artists: Brenetta Ward, Akoiya Harris, Ariel Paine, Sierra Parsons, Ricky Reyes, Nia Amina Minor, Brea Wilson, Eboni Wyatt
Art Opening & Reception: Saturday, November 4, 2023, from 6-8pm
6:30pm Hear from the artists
7:00pm Dance performance by Akoiya Harris and Nia Amina Minor
At Wa Na Wari, 911 24th Ave. in Seattle’s historic Central District
Refreshments provided
Listen to the stories of Black waterfront workers, Black educators, Black barbers and beauticians, and Black dancers; stories that the artists have incorporated into textile art, dance, film, zines, listening stations, and more.
The exhibit will be on view until January 20, 2024.
More info at https://www.wanawari.org/sbshi_show

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Red Eagle Soaring
Seattle, WA

Come join Red Eagle Soaring for a fun, relaxing evening of raising funds for one of the only Native youth theatres in the country & our new home at Station Space! Food / beverages / Performances / Silent Auction / Raffle / Raise The Paddle / Karaoke After Party & more! 21+ FREE EVENT.

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Join Alyssa Quintyne and Donald Crocker in a discussion about her latest exhibition Please Take Care and get all the backstory and details behind it.

Her work focuses on people, their identities, and relaying their ethereal characteristics. Her incorporation of flora, life cycles, figure, and social justice are common themes in Alyssa’s work that tie her subjects to the tangible and intangible. Her mediums include watercolor, ink, gold foil, and colored pencil.

“Please Take Care is an exhibition about my recent journey through chronic illness and climate anxiety. I’ve dealt with medical issues all my life, but over the past year I’ve dealt with a developing heart condition that became debilitating. I often found that my feelings overlayed what was happening around me outside – the vetch boom seemed to feel just like the creepy anxiety of managing my new symptoms, the flooding out in Circle matched my powerlessness with a new diagnosis, the butterflies seem to come right at my 2 month-versary of no ER visits. Now that I’m on the mend, I decided the best way to process this new normal for me was to be cathartic and create another way to look at my condition, the climate crises, and the life ahead of me.”
-Alyssa Quintyne

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

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Lan Su Chinese Garden
Portland, OR

We’re celebrating the beauty and cultural significance of chrysanthemums throughout November, in perfect harmony with the traditional Chinese Double Ninth Festival. These exquisite flowers hold a rich and storied history in Chinese culture, symbolizing traits such as longevity, nobility, and endurance.

Join us for a series of horticultural programs centered around chrysanthemums, paying tribute to their illustrious heritage. This includes the return of our enchanting nighttime floral designer showcase, “Nights of the Golden Flower.” You can also partake in enlightening plant walks and witness insightful cultivation demonstrations, all designed to deepen your appreciation for this cherished bloom and its profound role in Chinese heritage.

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Thanks to the popularity of the instantly recognizable Great Wave—cited everywhere from book covers and Lego sets to anime and emoji— Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) has become one of the most famous and influential artists in the world. This major exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), takes a new approach to the work of the versatile master, pairing more than 100 of his woodblock prints, paintings, and illustrated books from the MFA’s renowned collection with more than 200 works by his teachers, students, rivals, and admirers. Join us to explore Hokusai’s impact through the centuries and around the globe, on artists including Yoshitomo Nara, Chiho Aoshima, and Helen Frankenthaler.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Check one, two, three 🎤 “Sound Check! The Music We Make”, is a new exhibit at Wing Luke Museum on view from Sunday October 15, 2023 until September 14, 2024 🎧🎶💿🎹

Sound Check! celebrates the role of music in the lives of AANHPI communities. Dive into community-based stories as well as the experiences of AANHPI professionals in the music industry. Audiophiles and historians will be able to browse archival materials, photos, and artworks while also indulging in interactive audio-visual installations.

Featured artists include Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto of Soundgarden; singer-songwriter Carly Ann Calbero; jazz drummer Akira Tana; musician Roger Rigor; hip hop artist Geo Quibuyen of Blue Scholars and many more.


Don’t forget about the perks of becoming a Museum Member like unlimited free general admission and opportunities to see exhibits first at special Museum Member Receptions!

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Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement (STALM)
, WA
The Tribe’s Environmental and Natural Resources Team has been hard at work planning some fantastic upcoming restoration projects on Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands that you can contribute to! What better way to help redefine recreation by building reciprocity with the lands – while also enjoying all the benefits of being outside in community (both human and ecological)? Here’s the link to more from the ENR team about each event and the RSVP links! https://enr.snoqualmietribe.us/events/
Can’t make it? Stay tuned for additional opportunities!
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This exhibit showcases the work of folx who are part of the SWANA (Southwest Asia and North Africa) stitching community. The works encompass diasporic, immigrant, mixed, and queer stitches in a contemporary context with an ancestral throughline across time and space, oceans, continents, languages and mediums. The textile works range from Palestinian Tatreez embroidery and Egyptian Khayamiya appliqué to Armenian Janyak needlelace and many other regional stitches. Additionally, there will be new works drawing from multiple artistic disciplines, both ancient and modern, including writing, multimedia, propaganda, visual and plastic art, and inter-and-multi-disciplinary works. The event will include presentations by the artists and other cultural programming as well. And of course all SWANA events include food, music and dance.

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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“Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” brings together the artwork of Eugene Landry (1937-1988) with contemporary Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe artists and writers as they explore their cultural roots, tribal identity, and connection to ancestral land. Landry’s artwork offers a look at the political, economic, and cultural challenges the tribe faced during his lifetime—from near termination to federal recognition. Paralyzed by illness as a young man, Landry created his art from a wheelchair, using his non- dominant hand. Conversations with his former portrait models (now tribal elders), reveal his creative resilience and the positive impact he had in their young lives. Now, 35 years after Landry’s passing, a rediscovered collection of Landry’s art inspires a new generation of Shoalwater Bay artists. “Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” will be on view at Astoria Visual Arts November 11 through December 2.

Nov 11, 5:00pm at AVA:
Artist talk/reading with curator Judith Altruda

Dec 2, 1:00pm at AVA:
Contemporary Shoalwater Bay Artists’ Panel Discussion

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to announce that we have teamed up with the City of Shoreline and the Spartan Recreation Center to host the Arte de la Raza exhibition running Nov.2nd-Jan. 24th and featuring:
Che Lopez
Iris Sanchez
Jake Prendez
Rolando Avila
Teresa Martinez
Yessica Marquez
The exhibition opens Nov. 2nd which is also the same day as their Dia de los Muertos Festival!!

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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The day following Diwali is traditionally celebrated with the Annakut – literally meaning, a mountain of food. Every year thousands of vegetarian delicacies are offered in devotional gratitude for the past year and to seek blessings for the year ahead. The Annakut offering includes snacks, sweets, pickles, spicy dishes, salads, fruit drinks and other items devotionally prepared by devotees. We cordially invite you for darshan of the Annakut with family and friends.

  • Nov 11th: Family Diwali Annakut
    • 12:00 PM – 7:00 PM
  • Nov 12th: Sharda Chopda Pujan (Diwali)
    • 6:00 PM
  • Nov 14th: New Year
    • Aarti: 7:00 AM, 11:30AM, 6:45PM
    • Mandir Darshan: 7:00 AM Onwards
  • Nov 18th: Kids Diwali Celebration
    • 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM
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Urban League of Portland
Salem & Portland, OR

This year Urban League of Portland’s Feed the Folks coming to Salem AND Portland in the same week. Both events will be DRIVE-THRU and Walk-Up, meaning during event times, after you’ve checked in, you are welcome to drive your vehicle right up to Urban League staff and we’ll load your meals into your car.
No vehicle? No problem! Folks without transportation can still attend the event and pick up items in a wagon or cart if they are able.

Salem Feed the Folks will be on November 14th from 12pm – 3pm, at the ARCHES Lodge: 1875 Fisher Rd NE, Salem, OR 97305.

Portland Feed the Folks will be on November 16th from 12pm – 3pm at the Urban League of Portland Building: 10 N Russell St, Portland, OR 97227

REGISTER to attend and receive a FREE Holiday Meal Kit. They will also have limited outreach supplies available at each of these events.

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Uprise Collective
Hybrid

We are thrilled to announce our sixth annual Selah Storytelling Series! This year we will have amazing storytellers share stories of Creation, Resistance, and Healing in a hybrid space both in person and on zoom!
Stay tuned to learn about our storytellers, the location, and this years Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thankstaking celebration!
Access:
In person: ADA space with ADA bathrooms. Masks required. More details to come on parking and seating.
On-line: ASL and CART provided.
Details:
In its sixth year, the Selah Series provides a BIPOC-centered storytelling space for community members to share the fruits of their ancestors’ wisdom, resistance, and survivance, and an opportunity for all of us to build community that is reflective of our collective strength.
Creation Stories
November 2, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will be sharing stories of the creation of the Earth and the universe that come from indigenous cultural histories. From the Turtle Continent to the Popol Vuh to Mawu the Moon Being, this event is about reclaiming how the world was made.
Resistance Stories
November 9, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will share stories of protest, organizing, collective bargaining, and community care. What can we learn from those that came before us? What tactics are we using now to reimagine systems? The road map to social uplift has been written, and written well.
Healing Stories:
November 16, 2022, 6:00pm-8:00pm PST
How do we practice care in our communities outside of Western, capitalist, white supremacist models? The focus of this event will be on the holistic, indigenous, decolonized wellness that targeted communities use to engage in healing. From naturopathy to indigenous herbalism to healing tones, the focus of the event is to honor ancestral knowledge and our special knack for survival.
We also have a culminating meal-share event on Saturday, November 25th, Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thanks-taking. We’ll eat, build community, and BIPOC performers will share their gifts.

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Boise International Short Film Festival is excited to announce that finalists have been selected! The festival will be November 15th and 16th at 2pm-8pm at the Boise State University SPEC Theater. Admission is free so bring your friends! Stay tuned for sneak peaks of the selected films, as well as ticket information as there will be limited seats available.

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s'gʷi gʷi ʔ altxʷ House of Welcome / Evergreen Longhouse
Olympia, WA

This show is dedicated to Veterans, past and present and will be held at the Evergreen Gallery from October 16 – December 30, 2023. There will be a Grand Opening on Thursday, October 19 from 3 – 6 pm.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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Filipino Bayanihan Center
Portland, OR

Come through and join the KA Youth Program to learn and share migration stories!! Parents are invited to join and share their stories as well! Dinner is provided!!

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Wa Na Wari
Seattle, WA

We are very excited to announce that the first graduating cohort of our Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute is ready to share their work with the world. They have spent the last year creating art from the oral histories they recorded, and the upcoming exhibit at Wa Na Wari is the culmination of that work. We invite you to join us for the opening of this exhibit:
“Honored to Tell”: An exhibit of art and oral histories created by the first cohort to graduate from the Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute
Featured artists: Brenetta Ward, Akoiya Harris, Ariel Paine, Sierra Parsons, Ricky Reyes, Nia Amina Minor, Brea Wilson, Eboni Wyatt
Art Opening & Reception: Saturday, November 4, 2023, from 6-8pm
6:30pm Hear from the artists
7:00pm Dance performance by Akoiya Harris and Nia Amina Minor
At Wa Na Wari, 911 24th Ave. in Seattle’s historic Central District
Refreshments provided
Listen to the stories of Black waterfront workers, Black educators, Black barbers and beauticians, and Black dancers; stories that the artists have incorporated into textile art, dance, film, zines, listening stations, and more.
The exhibit will be on view until January 20, 2024.
More info at https://www.wanawari.org/sbshi_show

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Nooksack Indian Tribe
Everson, WA

The Nooksack Tribe proudly hosts the 2023 Heritage Dinner on Thursday, November 16th at 6pm at the Mi’sq’eq’o Community Building. All are welcome to attend.

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On Nov 16th you have the opportunity to see the almost finished edit of the upcoming documentary, “Khu.éex’: The Magic of Noise”. They’re having a special screening and fundraiser at The Seattle Drum School Georgetown and you’re invited to join us!
Members of Khu.éex’, Heartstone Studios and Preston Singletary will be in attendance. Email them at mediaheartstone@gmail.com to RSVP.

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On November 16, 2023, Hugo House is hosting a special collaboration with Snoqualmie Casino celebrating regional Indigenous talent, culture, and spirit featuring Sasha LaPointe, Nikki Suyama, Iz White, and Peter White.

The evening will begin with a land acknowledgement from Ken Workman, followed by readings from Sasha LaPointe and Iz White, with music from Nikki Suyama and a ceremonial dance performed by Peter White.

There will be a brief Q&A with Sasha LaPointe, and our friends at Elliott Bay Book Company will be on-site selling copies of her published work.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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Join the Alaska Historical Society and Cook Inlet Historical Society for the second of a four-part lecture and panel series about major public policy issues facing Alaska to create a more productive environment in which to arrive at sound public policy.
Beginning with the 1867 transfer of Alaska from Russian to American control, the federal government extended its administration over the territory. Was this “Americanization” positive, with new government services, or an unwelcome colonization? Americanization had both enormously positive and negative impacts which continue today. The unsettled relationship between the federal government, the state and Native groups deserves closer discussion as Alaskans consider ideas such as resource management and policies relating to Alaska Natives under the federal trust.
Panelists Ross Cohen, Mary Ehrlander, Ian Hartman and Charles Wohlforth weigh in before taking questions from a live and online audience. Free. Use the museum’s 7th Avenue entrance to enter.
The AHS is Alaska’s largest statewide organization dedicated to the informed exchange of ideas through a factual appreciation of Alaska’s history. It is partnering with the Cook Inlet Historical Society and the Anchorage Museum on the series. The Atwood Foundation has provided a generous grant to cover costs. Other supporting organizations include the League of Women Voters, the University of Alaska Anchorage Seawolf Debate Program and OLE!, an Anchorage-based nonprofit which offers educational classes.
Image: Sitka from the governor’s garden; St. Michael’s Cathedral on left, 1868-1869. Eadweard James Muybridge Photograph Collection, Alaska State Library, ASL-P15-07.
About the Panelists
Ross Cohen is a lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Washington. He is also editor of Alaska History (AHS Journal), the semi-annual journal of the Alaska Historical Society.
Mary Ehlander is an emeritus professor of history at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) and former director of the Arctic and Northern Studies Program at UAF. She is the author of numerous books and publications, including Walter Harper, Alaska’s Native Sun, and Equal Educational Opportunity: Brown’s Elusive Mandate.
Ian Hartman is a professor and chair of the history department at the University of Alaska Anchorage. He teaches modern American history with an emphasis on issues related to economic and racial inequality.
Charles Wohlforth was an Anchorage Daily News reporter from 1988 to 1992 and wrote a regular opinion column from 2015 until 2019. He served two terms on the Anchorage Assembly. He is the author of a dozen books about Alaska, science, history and the environment.

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yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

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Lan Su Chinese Garden
Portland, OR

We’re celebrating the beauty and cultural significance of chrysanthemums throughout November, in perfect harmony with the traditional Chinese Double Ninth Festival. These exquisite flowers hold a rich and storied history in Chinese culture, symbolizing traits such as longevity, nobility, and endurance.

Join us for a series of horticultural programs centered around chrysanthemums, paying tribute to their illustrious heritage. This includes the return of our enchanting nighttime floral designer showcase, “Nights of the Golden Flower.” You can also partake in enlightening plant walks and witness insightful cultivation demonstrations, all designed to deepen your appreciation for this cherished bloom and its profound role in Chinese heritage.

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Thanks to the popularity of the instantly recognizable Great Wave—cited everywhere from book covers and Lego sets to anime and emoji— Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) has become one of the most famous and influential artists in the world. This major exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), takes a new approach to the work of the versatile master, pairing more than 100 of his woodblock prints, paintings, and illustrated books from the MFA’s renowned collection with more than 200 works by his teachers, students, rivals, and admirers. Join us to explore Hokusai’s impact through the centuries and around the globe, on artists including Yoshitomo Nara, Chiho Aoshima, and Helen Frankenthaler.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Check one, two, three 🎤 “Sound Check! The Music We Make”, is a new exhibit at Wing Luke Museum on view from Sunday October 15, 2023 until September 14, 2024 🎧🎶💿🎹

Sound Check! celebrates the role of music in the lives of AANHPI communities. Dive into community-based stories as well as the experiences of AANHPI professionals in the music industry. Audiophiles and historians will be able to browse archival materials, photos, and artworks while also indulging in interactive audio-visual installations.

Featured artists include Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto of Soundgarden; singer-songwriter Carly Ann Calbero; jazz drummer Akira Tana; musician Roger Rigor; hip hop artist Geo Quibuyen of Blue Scholars and many more.


Don’t forget about the perks of becoming a Museum Member like unlimited free general admission and opportunities to see exhibits first at special Museum Member Receptions!

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Black & Beyond the Binary Collective
Portland, OR

We have a special event coming up for TDOR on November 17th. Sign up to get a some food and a special queer care package. We take care of us ❤️

#blackandbeyondthebinarycollective #tdor2023 #tdor

IMAGE DESCRIPTION: Teal feathered stripe down a soft pink background with an image of two Black hands clasped. A drawing of pink and blue candles line the bottom, beneath B3C’s logo. Text reads: Trans Diaspora of Rejuvenation: Nov 17th. Sign up for food and a care package. Event for Black and Brown queer folx only.

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Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement (STALM)
, WA
The Tribe’s Environmental and Natural Resources Team has been hard at work planning some fantastic upcoming restoration projects on Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands that you can contribute to! What better way to help redefine recreation by building reciprocity with the lands – while also enjoying all the benefits of being outside in community (both human and ecological)? Here’s the link to more from the ENR team about each event and the RSVP links! https://enr.snoqualmietribe.us/events/
Can’t make it? Stay tuned for additional opportunities!
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This exhibit showcases the work of folx who are part of the SWANA (Southwest Asia and North Africa) stitching community. The works encompass diasporic, immigrant, mixed, and queer stitches in a contemporary context with an ancestral throughline across time and space, oceans, continents, languages and mediums. The textile works range from Palestinian Tatreez embroidery and Egyptian Khayamiya appliqué to Armenian Janyak needlelace and many other regional stitches. Additionally, there will be new works drawing from multiple artistic disciplines, both ancient and modern, including writing, multimedia, propaganda, visual and plastic art, and inter-and-multi-disciplinary works. The event will include presentations by the artists and other cultural programming as well. And of course all SWANA events include food, music and dance.

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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“Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” brings together the artwork of Eugene Landry (1937-1988) with contemporary Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe artists and writers as they explore their cultural roots, tribal identity, and connection to ancestral land. Landry’s artwork offers a look at the political, economic, and cultural challenges the tribe faced during his lifetime—from near termination to federal recognition. Paralyzed by illness as a young man, Landry created his art from a wheelchair, using his non- dominant hand. Conversations with his former portrait models (now tribal elders), reveal his creative resilience and the positive impact he had in their young lives. Now, 35 years after Landry’s passing, a rediscovered collection of Landry’s art inspires a new generation of Shoalwater Bay artists. “Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” will be on view at Astoria Visual Arts November 11 through December 2.

Nov 11, 5:00pm at AVA:
Artist talk/reading with curator Judith Altruda

Dec 2, 1:00pm at AVA:
Contemporary Shoalwater Bay Artists’ Panel Discussion

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to announce that we have teamed up with the City of Shoreline and the Spartan Recreation Center to host the Arte de la Raza exhibition running Nov.2nd-Jan. 24th and featuring:
Che Lopez
Iris Sanchez
Jake Prendez
Rolando Avila
Teresa Martinez
Yessica Marquez
The exhibition opens Nov. 2nd which is also the same day as their Dia de los Muertos Festival!!

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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The day following Diwali is traditionally celebrated with the Annakut – literally meaning, a mountain of food. Every year thousands of vegetarian delicacies are offered in devotional gratitude for the past year and to seek blessings for the year ahead. The Annakut offering includes snacks, sweets, pickles, spicy dishes, salads, fruit drinks and other items devotionally prepared by devotees. We cordially invite you for darshan of the Annakut with family and friends.

  • Nov 11th: Family Diwali Annakut
    • 12:00 PM – 7:00 PM
  • Nov 12th: Sharda Chopda Pujan (Diwali)
    • 6:00 PM
  • Nov 14th: New Year
    • Aarti: 7:00 AM, 11:30AM, 6:45PM
    • Mandir Darshan: 7:00 AM Onwards
  • Nov 18th: Kids Diwali Celebration
    • 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM
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Seattle Turkish Film Festival (STFF)
Seattle, WA
Uprise Collective
Hybrid

We are thrilled to announce our sixth annual Selah Storytelling Series! This year we will have amazing storytellers share stories of Creation, Resistance, and Healing in a hybrid space both in person and on zoom!
Stay tuned to learn about our storytellers, the location, and this years Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thankstaking celebration!
Access:
In person: ADA space with ADA bathrooms. Masks required. More details to come on parking and seating.
On-line: ASL and CART provided.
Details:
In its sixth year, the Selah Series provides a BIPOC-centered storytelling space for community members to share the fruits of their ancestors’ wisdom, resistance, and survivance, and an opportunity for all of us to build community that is reflective of our collective strength.
Creation Stories
November 2, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will be sharing stories of the creation of the Earth and the universe that come from indigenous cultural histories. From the Turtle Continent to the Popol Vuh to Mawu the Moon Being, this event is about reclaiming how the world was made.
Resistance Stories
November 9, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will share stories of protest, organizing, collective bargaining, and community care. What can we learn from those that came before us? What tactics are we using now to reimagine systems? The road map to social uplift has been written, and written well.
Healing Stories:
November 16, 2022, 6:00pm-8:00pm PST
How do we practice care in our communities outside of Western, capitalist, white supremacist models? The focus of this event will be on the holistic, indigenous, decolonized wellness that targeted communities use to engage in healing. From naturopathy to indigenous herbalism to healing tones, the focus of the event is to honor ancestral knowledge and our special knack for survival.
We also have a culminating meal-share event on Saturday, November 25th, Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thanks-taking. We’ll eat, build community, and BIPOC performers will share their gifts.

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s'gʷi gʷi ʔ altxʷ House of Welcome / Evergreen Longhouse
Olympia, WA

This show is dedicated to Veterans, past and present and will be held at the Evergreen Gallery from October 16 – December 30, 2023. There will be a Grand Opening on Thursday, October 19 from 3 – 6 pm.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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Legendary Children PNW
Seattle, WA
Legendary Children is back for it’s 8th year!
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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Black ‘n’ Advocacy covers our process for navigating legislative advocacy at Surge Reproductive Justice, with a focus on Washington state. This training was born out of the lived experience and political analysis of Black anti-racist organizers and legislative advocates attempting to work within “the system” and quickly identifying the pitfalls of that system and what working around it looks like in service of our communities. This online training is highly interactive, and approximately 3 hours long. We welcome people from all backgrounds to attend!

We believe in the power of political education and collective analysis building, so we offer our leadership development trainings every trimester. It’s that time! These trainings are opportunities to deepen your understanding and commitment to anti-racism, reproductive justice, and legislative advocacy through a Black feminist lens. They are also a great way to build community with like-spirited people from around the country in an accessible and fun way.

We ask attendees to pay for their participation in our trainings if they are non-BIPOC. The donation link, and a self-survey to determine which gift amount feels right for you, can be accessed below by copying and pasting the URLs into your web browser:

Donation Self-Survey: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1GbwmWRKewfbbQRHqqaL7mVQKaSru7oBRYS_Hsmm5al8/edit

Please donate here, with a note including this trainings’ name: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=AN25A33QYXHLS&source=url&ssrt=1697664193524

There is a $75 stipend available for community members who are Black, Indigenous, and/or people of color who are experiencing financial difficulties, but would like to attend this session. More information and the form to request the stipend will be sent out after the session.

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Wa Na Wari
Seattle, WA

We are very excited to announce that the first graduating cohort of our Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute is ready to share their work with the world. They have spent the last year creating art from the oral histories they recorded, and the upcoming exhibit at Wa Na Wari is the culmination of that work. We invite you to join us for the opening of this exhibit:
“Honored to Tell”: An exhibit of art and oral histories created by the first cohort to graduate from the Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute
Featured artists: Brenetta Ward, Akoiya Harris, Ariel Paine, Sierra Parsons, Ricky Reyes, Nia Amina Minor, Brea Wilson, Eboni Wyatt
Art Opening & Reception: Saturday, November 4, 2023, from 6-8pm
6:30pm Hear from the artists
7:00pm Dance performance by Akoiya Harris and Nia Amina Minor
At Wa Na Wari, 911 24th Ave. in Seattle’s historic Central District
Refreshments provided
Listen to the stories of Black waterfront workers, Black educators, Black barbers and beauticians, and Black dancers; stories that the artists have incorporated into textile art, dance, film, zines, listening stations, and more.
The exhibit will be on view until January 20, 2024.
More info at https://www.wanawari.org/sbshi_show

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German American Society of Portland
Portland, OR

Stammtisch is a gathering of friends and community. This event is open to all ages, and you do not have to be a member to attend. You do not have to know how to speak German unless you take a seat at the Stammtisch table!

GASoP will provide food and beer, wine, and non-alcoholic drinks will be available for purchase. Attendees are encouraged to bring food to share. (Nibbles are fine but no one would say nein to some spätzle!)

Stammtisch is held in our Bierstube every third Friday of the month except in December.

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Join Confluence for the launch of the second volume of the Voices of the River journal! Voices of the River is a journal that explores the Columbia River system’s history, living cultures, and ecology through Indigenous voices. Volume II’s theme (The Legacy of Dams and the Return of the Salmon) is posed to invite meditation on our past, present, and future: What is the legacy of damming the Columbia? What benefits would come from restoring salmon populations to the Columbia and reviving the health of the river?

This issue features articles by Michelle Jacob, Carol Craig, Lindsey Schneider, and Rachel Cushman; poetry by Hii-ne Jake A. DePoe. and Owen L. Oliver; and art by Chanti Manon and Sarah Folden. Join Confluences Lead Editor Dr. David Lewis and cover artist Chanti Manon for a short discussion on the volume, followed by mingling, food, and the first opportunity to buy the journal.

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Join the Leonor R. Fuller Gallery in honoring the legacy of Hazel Pete, master weaver, and the rich practices of Chehalis basket weaving.
The 15th Native American Art Exhibition is a themed exhibition highlighting traditional and contemporary basketry woven by the Hazel Pete Family. The exhibition includes coil and woven basketry types, a cattail mat lean-to, cedar clothing, storage baskets, storyteller doll diorama, photos depicting the gathering process, and contemporary glass baskets made at the Museum of Glass. Hazel Pete was a 6th generation weaver from treaty negation times in western Washington – 7th, 8th, and 9th generation weavers will be featured in this exhibit.

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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Suquamish Tribe
Suquamish, WA

Event is open to all ages
Free Admission
Local vendors
30 vendors at each event
Variety of Native American artists
Variety of handmade goods

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

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National Nordic Museum
Seattle, WA

The National Nordic Museum invites you to experience its 46th Annual Julefest! Enjoy an authentic Nordic holiday experience, right in the heart of Ballard. Modeled after the traditional outdoor Christmas markets found in the Nordic countries, this community favorite features all the fun and goodies associated with the Nordic holidays, with a Pacific Northwest twist!

During Julefest, visitors are immersed in a variety of Nordic holiday traditions. Guests can expect to discover a modern spin on a traditional market as they can shop from over 30+ local artists, taste traditional holiday fare, and enjoy live entertainment throughout the grounds. Stay tuned for additional festival program details!

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ShoreLake Arts
Shoreline, WA

Start your holiday shopping in Shoreline to find that perfect hand-crafted gift.

We can’t think of anything more quintessentially wintery than a stroll through a unique holiday market. We are excited to bring the Shoreline Holiday Market and Shoreline Farmers Market together with everything under one roof (quite literally!) at the Shoreline City Hall undercover parking garage (open air).

Please note that for safety reasons related to food and the number of visitors, pets are not allowed at the Underground Holiday Market. Service animals, on the other hand, are welcome.

Presented by ShoreLake Arts, in collaboration with the Shoreline Farmers Market,

with support from City of Shoreline RCCS.

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Lan Su Chinese Garden
Portland, OR

We’re celebrating the beauty and cultural significance of chrysanthemums throughout November, in perfect harmony with the traditional Chinese Double Ninth Festival. These exquisite flowers hold a rich and storied history in Chinese culture, symbolizing traits such as longevity, nobility, and endurance.

Join us for a series of horticultural programs centered around chrysanthemums, paying tribute to their illustrious heritage. This includes the return of our enchanting nighttime floral designer showcase, “Nights of the Golden Flower.” You can also partake in enlightening plant walks and witness insightful cultivation demonstrations, all designed to deepen your appreciation for this cherished bloom and its profound role in Chinese heritage.

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Thanks to the popularity of the instantly recognizable Great Wave—cited everywhere from book covers and Lego sets to anime and emoji— Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) has become one of the most famous and influential artists in the world. This major exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), takes a new approach to the work of the versatile master, pairing more than 100 of his woodblock prints, paintings, and illustrated books from the MFA’s renowned collection with more than 200 works by his teachers, students, rivals, and admirers. Join us to explore Hokusai’s impact through the centuries and around the globe, on artists including Yoshitomo Nara, Chiho Aoshima, and Helen Frankenthaler.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Check one, two, three 🎤 “Sound Check! The Music We Make”, is a new exhibit at Wing Luke Museum on view from Sunday October 15, 2023 until September 14, 2024 🎧🎶💿🎹

Sound Check! celebrates the role of music in the lives of AANHPI communities. Dive into community-based stories as well as the experiences of AANHPI professionals in the music industry. Audiophiles and historians will be able to browse archival materials, photos, and artworks while also indulging in interactive audio-visual installations.

Featured artists include Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto of Soundgarden; singer-songwriter Carly Ann Calbero; jazz drummer Akira Tana; musician Roger Rigor; hip hop artist Geo Quibuyen of Blue Scholars and many more.


Don’t forget about the perks of becoming a Museum Member like unlimited free general admission and opportunities to see exhibits first at special Museum Member Receptions!

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Africa Fashion opens at the Portland Art Museum after acclaimed runs at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum and the Brooklyn Museum of Art. This first-of-its-kind exhibition, making its only West Coast stop at PAM, honors the irresistible creativity, ingenuity, and unstoppable global impact of contemporary African fashions. Garments and textiles dating from the mid-twentieth century to the present day, contextualized by a range of cultural touchstones such as Drum magazines, Fela Kuti record albums, and studio photography from Sanlé Sory, celebrate the transformative and liberatory power of self-fashioning. The New Yorker’s art critic Hilton Als called Africa Fashion a “vital and necessary exhibition.”

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Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement (STALM)
, WA
The Tribe’s Environmental and Natural Resources Team has been hard at work planning some fantastic upcoming restoration projects on Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands that you can contribute to! What better way to help redefine recreation by building reciprocity with the lands – while also enjoying all the benefits of being outside in community (both human and ecological)? Here’s the link to more from the ENR team about each event and the RSVP links! https://enr.snoqualmietribe.us/events/
Can’t make it? Stay tuned for additional opportunities!
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This exhibit showcases the work of folx who are part of the SWANA (Southwest Asia and North Africa) stitching community. The works encompass diasporic, immigrant, mixed, and queer stitches in a contemporary context with an ancestral throughline across time and space, oceans, continents, languages and mediums. The textile works range from Palestinian Tatreez embroidery and Egyptian Khayamiya appliqué to Armenian Janyak needlelace and many other regional stitches. Additionally, there will be new works drawing from multiple artistic disciplines, both ancient and modern, including writing, multimedia, propaganda, visual and plastic art, and inter-and-multi-disciplinary works. The event will include presentations by the artists and other cultural programming as well. And of course all SWANA events include food, music and dance.

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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“Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” brings together the artwork of Eugene Landry (1937-1988) with contemporary Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe artists and writers as they explore their cultural roots, tribal identity, and connection to ancestral land. Landry’s artwork offers a look at the political, economic, and cultural challenges the tribe faced during his lifetime—from near termination to federal recognition. Paralyzed by illness as a young man, Landry created his art from a wheelchair, using his non- dominant hand. Conversations with his former portrait models (now tribal elders), reveal his creative resilience and the positive impact he had in their young lives. Now, 35 years after Landry’s passing, a rediscovered collection of Landry’s art inspires a new generation of Shoalwater Bay artists. “Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” will be on view at Astoria Visual Arts November 11 through December 2.

Nov 11, 5:00pm at AVA:
Artist talk/reading with curator Judith Altruda

Dec 2, 1:00pm at AVA:
Contemporary Shoalwater Bay Artists’ Panel Discussion

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Powerful Voices
Seattle, WA

Join other passionate BIPOC girls & gender expansive teens who are passionate about Palestinian freedom and liberation. We’ll be meeting up at 11am in the ID to make protest signs & art, eat, ground ourselves, and go over best protest safety practices before heading over to Westlake for the protest at 2pm.

Shoutout to @Falastiniyat for sharing their wisdom with us and for holding this crucial work with immense care and dedication.

Sign up at bit.ly/youth4pal or visit the link in bio ❤️

From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free!

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Community for the Advancement of Family Education (CAFE)
Wenatchee, WA

Wenatchee Cafes Mission is to advance family and community growth through education. They serve the culturally diverse community providing opportunities in leadership, civic and social engagement, literacy development, and academic advancement.

CAFÉ Priorities:

Family Education
Community Participation
Promoting Leadership
Environmental Justice

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Wa Na Wari is hosting a holiday marketplace and vintage pop up. There’ll be art, jewelry, vintage treasures, Wa Na Wari hoodies, and more. This is where you get that holiday gift list handled. Come spend time with the new exhibit AND do some shopping.

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to announce that we have teamed up with the City of Shoreline and the Spartan Recreation Center to host the Arte de la Raza exhibition running Nov.2nd-Jan. 24th and featuring:
Che Lopez
Iris Sanchez
Jake Prendez
Rolando Avila
Teresa Martinez
Yessica Marquez
The exhibition opens Nov. 2nd which is also the same day as their Dia de los Muertos Festival!!

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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The day following Diwali is traditionally celebrated with the Annakut – literally meaning, a mountain of food. Every year thousands of vegetarian delicacies are offered in devotional gratitude for the past year and to seek blessings for the year ahead. The Annakut offering includes snacks, sweets, pickles, spicy dishes, salads, fruit drinks and other items devotionally prepared by devotees. We cordially invite you for darshan of the Annakut with family and friends.

  • Nov 11th: Family Diwali Annakut
    • 12:00 PM – 7:00 PM
  • Nov 12th: Sharda Chopda Pujan (Diwali)
    • 6:00 PM
  • Nov 14th: New Year
    • Aarti: 7:00 AM, 11:30AM, 6:45PM
    • Mandir Darshan: 7:00 AM Onwards
  • Nov 18th: Kids Diwali Celebration
    • 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM
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Join Rising Sons Media Nov 18th from 12-7pm at the old LOFT store. Shop from 18 local Indigenous artists to find the perfect holiday gifts for your loved ones! The market features handmade jewelry, artwork, paintings, beadwork, baskets, and more from 18 local Indigenous artists!

$10 all-day parking is available across the street at the 520 Pike Tower garage, or take the light rail to Westlake Mall!

Shop small this holiday season, and support Indigenous business!

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Seattle, WA

Jam with the Seattle Jazz Fellowship this Saturday at Seattle Drum School of Music!

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Alaska Black Chamber of Commerce
Anchorage, AK

Imagine the energy and sales of the annual Alaska Black Business Expo but with a more intimate holiday feel! With a goal to be the premier shopping place for people looking to get holiday gifts, contract with companies who put on their holiday parties and support people who are traveling for the holidays and need their gifts taken care of. Space is limited and we will be doing HEAVY advertising and inviting a lot of companies who contract out parties and gifts for all types of holiday functions.

Santa will be in the house with a whole room of activities for the kids and their favorite holiday films playing while adults shop, mingle, jingle and get ready for the holidays

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Seattle Turkish Film Festival (STFF)
Seattle, WA
Salem Multicultural Institute and World Beat
Salem, OR

Join World Beat for their inaugural Holiday Night Market.

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Uprise Collective
Hybrid

We are thrilled to announce our sixth annual Selah Storytelling Series! This year we will have amazing storytellers share stories of Creation, Resistance, and Healing in a hybrid space both in person and on zoom!
Stay tuned to learn about our storytellers, the location, and this years Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thankstaking celebration!
Access:
In person: ADA space with ADA bathrooms. Masks required. More details to come on parking and seating.
On-line: ASL and CART provided.
Details:
In its sixth year, the Selah Series provides a BIPOC-centered storytelling space for community members to share the fruits of their ancestors’ wisdom, resistance, and survivance, and an opportunity for all of us to build community that is reflective of our collective strength.
Creation Stories
November 2, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will be sharing stories of the creation of the Earth and the universe that come from indigenous cultural histories. From the Turtle Continent to the Popol Vuh to Mawu the Moon Being, this event is about reclaiming how the world was made.
Resistance Stories
November 9, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will share stories of protest, organizing, collective bargaining, and community care. What can we learn from those that came before us? What tactics are we using now to reimagine systems? The road map to social uplift has been written, and written well.
Healing Stories:
November 16, 2022, 6:00pm-8:00pm PST
How do we practice care in our communities outside of Western, capitalist, white supremacist models? The focus of this event will be on the holistic, indigenous, decolonized wellness that targeted communities use to engage in healing. From naturopathy to indigenous herbalism to healing tones, the focus of the event is to honor ancestral knowledge and our special knack for survival.
We also have a culminating meal-share event on Saturday, November 25th, Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thanks-taking. We’ll eat, build community, and BIPOC performers will share their gifts.

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Falastiniyat
Seattle, WA

Until liberation, our voices will echo in every street, in every city, across mountains, until every corner of the world can be heard calling for a Free Palestine.

We will be back in the streets again this Saturday at 2PM! See you out there.

🇵🇸🇵🇸From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free🇵🇸🇵🇸

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s'gʷi gʷi ʔ altxʷ House of Welcome / Evergreen Longhouse
Olympia, WA

This show is dedicated to Veterans, past and present and will be held at the Evergreen Gallery from October 16 – December 30, 2023. There will be a Grand Opening on Thursday, October 19 from 3 – 6 pm.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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Seattle Latvian Center
Seattle, WA

Svinēsim Latvijas Neatkarības Dienu Sietlas Latviešu Centrā.

Come Celebrate Latvia’s Independence Day at the Seattle Latvian Community Center.

Informācija sekos / Information to follow.

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Dabuli
Bellevue, WA

Get ready to experience the ultimate celebration of Nepalese culture at Nepal Festival 2023, where traditions, music, and flavors come alive!

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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Indians of Oregon
Lincoln City, OR

The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians invites you to our Annual 45th Restoration, held at Chinook Winds Casino Resort.

Grand Entry will be at 6:00 PM.

All Dancers and Drummers welcome!

This is a family event; drugs and alcohol will not be tolerated. The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians and Chinook Winds Casino Resort are not responsible for injuries and lost or stolen items.

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Wa Na Wari
Seattle, WA

We are very excited to announce that the first graduating cohort of our Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute is ready to share their work with the world. They have spent the last year creating art from the oral histories they recorded, and the upcoming exhibit at Wa Na Wari is the culmination of that work. We invite you to join us for the opening of this exhibit:
“Honored to Tell”: An exhibit of art and oral histories created by the first cohort to graduate from the Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute
Featured artists: Brenetta Ward, Akoiya Harris, Ariel Paine, Sierra Parsons, Ricky Reyes, Nia Amina Minor, Brea Wilson, Eboni Wyatt
Art Opening & Reception: Saturday, November 4, 2023, from 6-8pm
6:30pm Hear from the artists
7:00pm Dance performance by Akoiya Harris and Nia Amina Minor
At Wa Na Wari, 911 24th Ave. in Seattle’s historic Central District
Refreshments provided
Listen to the stories of Black waterfront workers, Black educators, Black barbers and beauticians, and Black dancers; stories that the artists have incorporated into textile art, dance, film, zines, listening stations, and more.
The exhibit will be on view until January 20, 2024.
More info at https://www.wanawari.org/sbshi_show

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Whitman College Intercultural Center
Walla Walla, WA

Whitman College is excited to announce the inaugural Pášx̣apa Powwow, taking place on campus Saturday, Nov. 18, 2023. This event will bring together tribal leaders, honored guests, drummers and dancers from throughout the Pacific Northwest. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Walla Walla Community College are co-hosts.

11 a.m. Participant Registration
12 p.m. Doors Open
1 p.m. Grand Entry
5 p.m. Break and Meal
6 p.m. Grand Entry

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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yəhaw̓
Seattle, WA

We invite community to join us in the Fall for workdays on the land, starting 9/15 – 11/19.

These workdays have been great opportunities for us to introduce ourselves to the land and to foster our relationships to it. Volunteers can help in a number of ways, like tending to Native plants, clearing invasive ones like ivy, envisioning futures, and getting the land ready for upcoming gatherings. We also invite you to help by just spending time on this site. Sit and relax by the trees and Mapes Creek, use our art supplies to create, help us collect & save seeds for gifts, or just take a moment from your week and spend time in greenspace.

Open to Native/BIPOC: Fridays, Sept 15 – Nov 19, from 2 – 6pm
Open to All: 1st Saturdays, October & November, from 11am – 3pm

Visit https://bit.ly/3qaL3AR or hit the link in our bio to register.

*Tools, a porta potty, limited drinking water, and light snacks will be provided. All ages and experience levels welcome. Note, our site does not have running water or power, and is unfortunately not yet ADA accessible. We can’t wait to see you on the land!

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

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Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

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National Nordic Museum
Seattle, WA

The National Nordic Museum invites you to experience its 46th Annual Julefest! Enjoy an authentic Nordic holiday experience, right in the heart of Ballard. Modeled after the traditional outdoor Christmas markets found in the Nordic countries, this community favorite features all the fun and goodies associated with the Nordic holidays, with a Pacific Northwest twist!

During Julefest, visitors are immersed in a variety of Nordic holiday traditions. Guests can expect to discover a modern spin on a traditional market as they can shop from over 30+ local artists, taste traditional holiday fare, and enjoy live entertainment throughout the grounds. Stay tuned for additional festival program details!

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Lan Su Chinese Garden
Portland, OR

We’re celebrating the beauty and cultural significance of chrysanthemums throughout November, in perfect harmony with the traditional Chinese Double Ninth Festival. These exquisite flowers hold a rich and storied history in Chinese culture, symbolizing traits such as longevity, nobility, and endurance.

Join us for a series of horticultural programs centered around chrysanthemums, paying tribute to their illustrious heritage. This includes the return of our enchanting nighttime floral designer showcase, “Nights of the Golden Flower.” You can also partake in enlightening plant walks and witness insightful cultivation demonstrations, all designed to deepen your appreciation for this cherished bloom and its profound role in Chinese heritage.

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Thanks to the popularity of the instantly recognizable Great Wave—cited everywhere from book covers and Lego sets to anime and emoji— Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) has become one of the most famous and influential artists in the world. This major exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), takes a new approach to the work of the versatile master, pairing more than 100 of his woodblock prints, paintings, and illustrated books from the MFA’s renowned collection with more than 200 works by his teachers, students, rivals, and admirers. Join us to explore Hokusai’s impact through the centuries and around the globe, on artists including Yoshitomo Nara, Chiho Aoshima, and Helen Frankenthaler.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Check one, two, three 🎤 “Sound Check! The Music We Make”, is a new exhibit at Wing Luke Museum on view from Sunday October 15, 2023 until September 14, 2024 🎧🎶💿🎹

Sound Check! celebrates the role of music in the lives of AANHPI communities. Dive into community-based stories as well as the experiences of AANHPI professionals in the music industry. Audiophiles and historians will be able to browse archival materials, photos, and artworks while also indulging in interactive audio-visual installations.

Featured artists include Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto of Soundgarden; singer-songwriter Carly Ann Calbero; jazz drummer Akira Tana; musician Roger Rigor; hip hop artist Geo Quibuyen of Blue Scholars and many more.


Don’t forget about the perks of becoming a Museum Member like unlimited free general admission and opportunities to see exhibits first at special Museum Member Receptions!

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Africa Fashion opens at the Portland Art Museum after acclaimed runs at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum and the Brooklyn Museum of Art. This first-of-its-kind exhibition, making its only West Coast stop at PAM, honors the irresistible creativity, ingenuity, and unstoppable global impact of contemporary African fashions. Garments and textiles dating from the mid-twentieth century to the present day, contextualized by a range of cultural touchstones such as Drum magazines, Fela Kuti record albums, and studio photography from Sanlé Sory, celebrate the transformative and liberatory power of self-fashioning. The New Yorker’s art critic Hilton Als called Africa Fashion a “vital and necessary exhibition.”

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Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement (STALM)
, WA
The Tribe’s Environmental and Natural Resources Team has been hard at work planning some fantastic upcoming restoration projects on Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands that you can contribute to! What better way to help redefine recreation by building reciprocity with the lands – while also enjoying all the benefits of being outside in community (both human and ecological)? Here’s the link to more from the ENR team about each event and the RSVP links! https://enr.snoqualmietribe.us/events/
Can’t make it? Stay tuned for additional opportunities!
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This exhibit showcases the work of folx who are part of the SWANA (Southwest Asia and North Africa) stitching community. The works encompass diasporic, immigrant, mixed, and queer stitches in a contemporary context with an ancestral throughline across time and space, oceans, continents, languages and mediums. The textile works range from Palestinian Tatreez embroidery and Egyptian Khayamiya appliqué to Armenian Janyak needlelace and many other regional stitches. Additionally, there will be new works drawing from multiple artistic disciplines, both ancient and modern, including writing, multimedia, propaganda, visual and plastic art, and inter-and-multi-disciplinary works. The event will include presentations by the artists and other cultural programming as well. And of course all SWANA events include food, music and dance.

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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“Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” brings together the artwork of Eugene Landry (1937-1988) with contemporary Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe artists and writers as they explore their cultural roots, tribal identity, and connection to ancestral land. Landry’s artwork offers a look at the political, economic, and cultural challenges the tribe faced during his lifetime—from near termination to federal recognition. Paralyzed by illness as a young man, Landry created his art from a wheelchair, using his non- dominant hand. Conversations with his former portrait models (now tribal elders), reveal his creative resilience and the positive impact he had in their young lives. Now, 35 years after Landry’s passing, a rediscovered collection of Landry’s art inspires a new generation of Shoalwater Bay artists. “Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” will be on view at Astoria Visual Arts November 11 through December 2.

Nov 11, 5:00pm at AVA:
Artist talk/reading with curator Judith Altruda

Dec 2, 1:00pm at AVA:
Contemporary Shoalwater Bay Artists’ Panel Discussion

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to announce that we have teamed up with the City of Shoreline and the Spartan Recreation Center to host the Arte de la Raza exhibition running Nov.2nd-Jan. 24th and featuring:
Che Lopez
Iris Sanchez
Jake Prendez
Rolando Avila
Teresa Martinez
Yessica Marquez
The exhibition opens Nov. 2nd which is also the same day as their Dia de los Muertos Festival!!

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—from monumental paintings to free-standing sculpture to works on paper. Designed in part to explore ways in which the art of the past meets and affects the art of the present, the exhibition gives voice to art as both aesthetic experimentation and social commentary from the 1960s to today. Driven by the conviction that history is constructed through both continuity and discontinuity, the exhibition strives to establish unexpected juxtapositions and revealing connections among historical and contemporary artists and artworks.

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Seattle Turkish Film Festival (STFF)
Seattle, WA
Uprise Collective
Hybrid

We are thrilled to announce our sixth annual Selah Storytelling Series! This year we will have amazing storytellers share stories of Creation, Resistance, and Healing in a hybrid space both in person and on zoom!
Stay tuned to learn about our storytellers, the location, and this years Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thankstaking celebration!
Access:
In person: ADA space with ADA bathrooms. Masks required. More details to come on parking and seating.
On-line: ASL and CART provided.
Details:
In its sixth year, the Selah Series provides a BIPOC-centered storytelling space for community members to share the fruits of their ancestors’ wisdom, resistance, and survivance, and an opportunity for all of us to build community that is reflective of our collective strength.
Creation Stories
November 2, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will be sharing stories of the creation of the Earth and the universe that come from indigenous cultural histories. From the Turtle Continent to the Popol Vuh to Mawu the Moon Being, this event is about reclaiming how the world was made.
Resistance Stories
November 9, 2022, 6:00-8:00pm PST
Storytellers will share stories of protest, organizing, collective bargaining, and community care. What can we learn from those that came before us? What tactics are we using now to reimagine systems? The road map to social uplift has been written, and written well.
Healing Stories:
November 16, 2022, 6:00pm-8:00pm PST
How do we practice care in our communities outside of Western, capitalist, white supremacist models? The focus of this event will be on the holistic, indigenous, decolonized wellness that targeted communities use to engage in healing. From naturopathy to indigenous herbalism to healing tones, the focus of the event is to honor ancestral knowledge and our special knack for survival.
We also have a culminating meal-share event on Saturday, November 25th, Outliving Thanksgiving, the Story of Thanks-taking. We’ll eat, build community, and BIPOC performers will share their gifts.

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Coeur d'Alene Tribe
Worley, ID

Join the Coeur D’Alene Casino for an afternoon of traditional storytelling and dance exhibition. Complete with complimentary fry bread and huckleberry jam. All ages welcome

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s'gʷi gʷi ʔ altxʷ House of Welcome / Evergreen Longhouse
Olympia, WA

This show is dedicated to Veterans, past and present and will be held at the Evergreen Gallery from October 16 – December 30, 2023. There will be a Grand Opening on Thursday, October 19 from 3 – 6 pm.

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Hindi Time Kids
Issaquah, WA

Hindi Time Kids is so happy to work for The Circle Community Navigation non-profit this Fall season, to bring to the Seattle community an Indian Heritage playgroup for the very first time! Children will be educated about the Indian culture including, languages, festivals, holidays , food names in a play based learning style. Sessions will be conducted through rhymes, songs, dance, arts/crafts and so much more. This is a completely free session as it is sponsored by The Circle Community Navigation but requires registration.

RSVP using the link below.

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Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

Join the Unbroken Circle​! Students in this program will have the opportunity to explore heritage through the personal, local, and cultural history of the people in the group. Students will showcase what they’ve learned at the Rhapsody Showcase during the NW Folklife Festival.

Who: ​For ages 11 and up

When: October 4 – December 6, 2023, Wednesdays at 4 pm

How much: sliding scale $0-$300

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Da Village
Seattle, WA
It takes a village to ensure we all feel seen, supported, and safe. It’s a tall order but we know that together, we can. We believe in the power that exists within the collective to co-create spaces of care.
This month, we’ve organized a very special healing event that centers around the idea of community care.In the wake of the violence taking place in Gaza, we want invite our community to come together to PRACTICE solidarity work in accessible ways.
On top of our signature free catered meals, free entertainment , healing services, and conscious community building work; this month we will have a few more offerings that may support us in living out our desires to be in solidarity.
There will be education spaces to learn more about the talking points and how to advocate, there will be a collective space for grief , there will be cultural performances and celebrations of Palestinian culture, sign creation, and opportunities to create self care kits for the core Palestinian organizers doing the important work here in seattle.
If you’d like to contribute to the self care kits, please bring items for between 15-30 people so we can construct the kits. Also reach out to us if you’d like to offer up any food , resources , or energy.
Look out for more info about all the amazing people involved in our collective action and the spaces we will create. Please share this post with people you feel might want to participate in our collective action and continue to build conscious community with us.
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Native Action Network
Seattle, WA

Native Action Network is proud to present the exhibition One With the Waters featuring artwork by Sarah Folden. A member of the Cowlitz Tribe, Sarah creates contemporary Coast Salish art inspired by her connection to place. Her work celebrates the vitality of Cowlitz people, their bold and colorful spirits, ancestral waters, animal relatives and all connected in nature. Cowlitz people are water-going people who refused to sign treaties with the federal government. This has created a diverse population. Over time many have traveled from their ancestral waters, some even across oceans, but much like our salmon relatives, there is an instinctive drive that calls Native people home. Sarah Folden’s artwork is created in honor of those still here, those who have made that voyage and those who are awakening to their internal calling to return.

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Wa Na Wari
Seattle, WA

We are very excited to announce that the first graduating cohort of our Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute is ready to share their work with the world. They have spent the last year creating art from the oral histories they recorded, and the upcoming exhibit at Wa Na Wari is the culmination of that work. We invite you to join us for the opening of this exhibit:
“Honored to Tell”: An exhibit of art and oral histories created by the first cohort to graduate from the Seattle Black Spatial Histories Institute
Featured artists: Brenetta Ward, Akoiya Harris, Ariel Paine, Sierra Parsons, Ricky Reyes, Nia Amina Minor, Brea Wilson, Eboni Wyatt
Art Opening & Reception: Saturday, November 4, 2023, from 6-8pm
6:30pm Hear from the artists
7:00pm Dance performance by Akoiya Harris and Nia Amina Minor
At Wa Na Wari, 911 24th Ave. in Seattle’s historic Central District
Refreshments provided
Listen to the stories of Black waterfront workers, Black educators, Black barbers and beauticians, and Black dancers; stories that the artists have incorporated into textile art, dance, film, zines, listening stations, and more.
The exhibit will be on view until January 20, 2024.
More info at https://www.wanawari.org/sbshi_show

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Portland Latin American Film Festival
Portland, OR

Wednesday, September 27 at 7:30, the XVII Portland Latin American Film Festival will kick off at the @hollywoodtheatr

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Chief Seattle Club
Seattle, WA

Chief Seattle Club is proud to present the fall exhibition in ʔálʔal Café featuring artwork by Naomi Parker. Naomi comes from the Makah, Yakama, and Chippewa/Cree people. Drawing on her intertribal ancestry, she uses oil paint on canvas to create scenes of far flung Native relations coming together at pow wow grounds and campsites. Through images of friendly faces and joyfully clasped hands, Naomi shows the power we have to create community wherever we gather.

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Anchorage, AK

The inNATE Show features 30 indigenous artists and will be displayed at the Middle Way Cafe from October 7th through December 2nd, 2023.

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Dive deep into the stories and science that surround the magnificent orca, apex predator of all oceans.
Follow the currents of ecological activism, popular culture, and Indigenous beliefs to gain a new appreciation of these sophisticated animals, long feared in Western cultures as “Killer Whales.”
Orcas: Our Shared Future includes more than 100 original artifacts and specimens, featuring life-size Orca replicas, fossils, films, objects from popular culture, and original artwork from the Indigenous peoples of the North American west coast.
Discover the complex social structure of orca society and reflect on the surprising consequences of captivity. Learn which orca populations are thriving and which are at risk, and resurface with a new understanding of how orcas and humans are inextricably connected.

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Each new generation of artists responds to and builds on the art of earlier periods. Bringing together artworks that bridge decades, Reverberations seeks to spark a hum between historical works and those by artists working today. Organized in thematic groups, Reverberations introduces a different topic in each gallery, ranging from landscape and lyrical abstraction to the use of the body in addressing psychological, social, and political concerns. As you move through the modern and contemporary galleries, you will encounter harmonies and dissonance as younger artists stake their claim. In turn, works from earlier decades will acquire new meaning and new layers of relevance.

This installation draws from SAM’s growing collection and incorporates many works acquired in recent years, by artists including Margarita Cabrera, Dana Claxton, Senga Nengudi, Rashid Johnson, Woody De Othello, Jenny Saville, Sarah Sze, and Naama Tsabar. Many works are on view for the first time. Among the modern classics, viewers will find works by Francis Bacon, Alberto Giacometti, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Mark Rothko, and David Smith on view. The museum’s ongoing commitment to building a collection with equity and diverse points of view can be seen when perusing the galleries.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Featuring the work of the Guma’ Gela’, a queer CHamoru art collective made up of members from the Marianas and in the diaspora. The exhibit explores their motto “part land, part sea, all ancestry” through a broad spectrum of media, including sculpture, soundscape, writing, printmaking, weaving, costume design, adornments, and more, to build a connection with CHamoru life, history, and traditions.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Do you ever wonder how Bruce Lee developed the philosophy behind his most iconic quote?

This incredible interactive exhibit invites viewers to step into the mind, body, and spirit of Bruce Lee to see how his unquenchable pursuit of knowledge informed his philosophy and life.

Follow Bruce’s path beginning with his revelations on water, through the wealth of knowledge found in his 2,800-book personal library, to his philosophy on self-understanding and self-expression.

The exhibition’s interactive technology interweaves beautiful imagery with Bruce’s personal objects and books to bring his journey to life.

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What do late 18th- to 19th-century Edo (present-day Tokyo) and late 19th-century Paris have in common? This exhibition, which can only be seen in Seattle, uncovers the shared renegade spirit that characterized the graphic arts and social cultures of these two dynamic cities. On view are over 90 Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings from SAM’s Japanese collection alongside private loans of works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901).

In addition to the intriguing formal and thematic parallels between these two collections of graphic arts, the exhibition reveals the social impulses behind their burgeoning art production. As both cities faced challenges to the status quo from the rising middle classes, subversive impulses gave rise to vibrant cultures of theatregoing, pleasure seeking, and new forms of visual art.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Considering both the presence and absence of Black artists is critical to understanding the breadth of Black artistic production in Oregon—even in the midst of historic exclusion—as well as how the impact of that history affects our understanding of American art history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. This exhibition serves to deepen our awareness of the talented artists who have shaped and inspired artists regionally and nationally, and it will be the first of its kind to consider the work of Black artists collectively in Oregon.

Beginning in the 1880s and spanning through today, Black Artists of Oregon captures the Black diasporic experiences particular to the Pacific Northwest with 67 artists and over 200 objects. Artists represented in the exhibition will include Thelma Johnson Streat, Al Goldsby, Charlotte Lewis, Isaka Shamsud-Din, Ralph Chessé, Charles Tatum, Arvie Smith, Shedrich Williames, Harrison Branch, Bobby Fouther, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. The exhibition and programming will also include the works of contemporary and younger artists working now, functioning as bright threads and offering intergenerational conversation throughout the exhibition, including sidony o’neal, Jeremy Okai Davis, damali ayo, Sharita Towne, Melanie Stevens, Lisa Jarrett, Tristan Irving, Ebin Lee, and Jaleesa Johnston.

Through the narrative flow of the exhibition, visitors will experience work by Black artists across decades and generations. Particular attention is given to the works of Black artists who were producing work during the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s, ’70s, and early ’80s, such as Portland-based painter Isaka Shamsud-Din. The exhibition will also mark regional artistic connections with global movements for Black liberation, as seen in the work of Charlotte Lewis alongside Portlanders Organized for Southern African Freedom and artists like Sadé DuBoise, whose “Resistance” poster series contributed to Portland’s 2020 George Floyd protests. Without chronological constraints, the exhibition is grounded by the work of elder artists, intergenerational conversations, and live activation in the exhibition galleries.

Black Artists of Oregon builds upon exhibition curator Intisar Abioto’s original research since 2018 exploring the lineage and legacy of Black artists in Oregon. The exhibition will continue Abioto’s research, which is grounded in Black American practices of listening, keeping, and passing on each others’ stories.

“Far from isolated or ancillary, Black arts and cultural production in Oregon has been in conversation and interchange with the world, and a part of its arts and cultural movements, all this time,” says Abioto. “Black Artists of Oregon is a heralding of Black presence, interchange, influence, and impact.”

View Event
Tacoma Art Museum
Tacoma, WA

Textile-based art and artwork responsive to social change are gaining prominence across the region and the country. To reflect this confluence, Tacoma Art Museum is proud to present the work of 21 artists in Soft Power, featuring more than 40 textile-based works on view from October 14, 2023, through September 1, 2024.

Soft Power draws its name and inspiration from Joseph Nye’s theory of cultural heritage as a form of non-coercive power. Using traditional processes to create contemporary declarations of resistance, resilience, love, and rebuke, this work explores the dynamic contrast between soft materials and so-called “hard” ideas. This engaging and provocative exhibition explores cultural stereotypes, humanity’s impact on the environment, and healthcare access.

The artists on view express themselves in forms as varied as their ideas: A quilted call to action, meticulously knit abstraction, woven cenotaphs, a stuffed and stitched creature, a scattered gathering of embroidered ephemera.

View Event

Thanks to the popularity of the instantly recognizable Great Wave—cited everywhere from book covers and Lego sets to anime and emoji— Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) has become one of the most famous and influential artists in the world. This major exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), takes a new approach to the work of the versatile master, pairing more than 100 of his woodblock prints, paintings, and illustrated books from the MFA’s renowned collection with more than 200 works by his teachers, students, rivals, and admirers. Join us to explore Hokusai’s impact through the centuries and around the globe, on artists including Yoshitomo Nara, Chiho Aoshima, and Helen Frankenthaler.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

Check one, two, three 🎤 “Sound Check! The Music We Make”, is a new exhibit at Wing Luke Museum on view from Sunday October 15, 2023 until September 14, 2024 🎧🎶💿🎹

Sound Check! celebrates the role of music in the lives of AANHPI communities. Dive into community-based stories as well as the experiences of AANHPI professionals in the music industry. Audiophiles and historians will be able to browse archival materials, photos, and artworks while also indulging in interactive audio-visual installations.

Featured artists include Kim Thayil and Hiro Yamamoto of Soundgarden; singer-songwriter Carly Ann Calbero; jazz drummer Akira Tana; musician Roger Rigor; hip hop artist Geo Quibuyen of Blue Scholars and many more.


Don’t forget about the perks of becoming a Museum Member like unlimited free general admission and opportunities to see exhibits first at special Museum Member Receptions!

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Africa Fashion opens at the Portland Art Museum after acclaimed runs at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum and the Brooklyn Museum of Art. This first-of-its-kind exhibition, making its only West Coast stop at PAM, honors the irresistible creativity, ingenuity, and unstoppable global impact of contemporary African fashions. Garments and textiles dating from the mid-twentieth century to the present day, contextualized by a range of cultural touchstones such as Drum magazines, Fela Kuti record albums, and studio photography from Sanlé Sory, celebrate the transformative and liberatory power of self-fashioning. The New Yorker’s art critic Hilton Als called Africa Fashion a “vital and necessary exhibition.”

View Event
Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement (STALM)
, WA
The Tribe’s Environmental and Natural Resources Team has been hard at work planning some fantastic upcoming restoration projects on Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands that you can contribute to! What better way to help redefine recreation by building reciprocity with the lands – while also enjoying all the benefits of being outside in community (both human and ecological)? Here’s the link to more from the ENR team about each event and the RSVP links! https://enr.snoqualmietribe.us/events/
Can’t make it? Stay tuned for additional opportunities!
View Event

This exhibit showcases the work of folx who are part of the SWANA (Southwest Asia and North Africa) stitching community. The works encompass diasporic, immigrant, mixed, and queer stitches in a contemporary context with an ancestral throughline across time and space, oceans, continents, languages and mediums. The textile works range from Palestinian Tatreez embroidery and Egyptian Khayamiya appliqué to Armenian Janyak needlelace and many other regional stitches. Additionally, there will be new works drawing from multiple artistic disciplines, both ancient and modern, including writing, multimedia, propaganda, visual and plastic art, and inter-and-multi-disciplinary works. The event will include presentations by the artists and other cultural programming as well. And of course all SWANA events include food, music and dance.

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Curated by artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation), this exhibition brings together works by an intergenerational group of nearly 50 living Native artists practicing across the United States. Their powerful expressions reflect the diversity of Native American individual, regional, and cultural identities. At the same time, these works share a worldview informed by thousands of years of reverence, study, and concern for the land.

Through a variety of practices—including weaving, beadwork, sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, photography, performance, and video—these artists visualize Indigenous knowledge of land/ landbase/ landscape. Together, the works in The Land Carries Our Ancestors underscore the self-determination, survivance, and right to self-representation of Indigenous peoples.

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Anchorage Museum
Anchorage , AK

On view March 21, 2023 through Spring 2024
Art of the North Galleries, Third Floor, East Wing

Good Medicine brings together Indigenous healers and medicine people to collectively create, share knowledge, and practice in community. Unfolding over the course of a year with the work of different Alaska Native healers, this multi-disciplinary exhibition offers diverse opportunities for gathering and exchange.

Colonialism has attacked and suppressed medicine people and Indigenous knowledge systems for hundreds of years. This exhibition addresses harmful legacies and shows how the revitalization of healing practices and traditions provides ways of being in alignment with oneself, with community, and with our planet.

Curated by Tlingit traditional healer Meda DeWitt, Good Medicine emphasizes spiritual renewal, cultural renascence, and the importance of co-creating futures where nature can thrive.

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I paint from historical photographs of people; the majority of them had no name, no bio, no story left. Nothing. I feel they are kind of lost souls, spirit-ghosts. My painting is a memorial site for them.
—Hung Liu

Groundbreaking Chinese American artist Hung Liu (1948–2021) made highly narrative images that foregrounded workers, immigrants, refugees, women, children, and soldiers in haunting, incandescent portraits that mingle Chinese and Western artistic traditions. Liu was born in Changchun, China, and her childhood and youth coincided with one of the most tumultuous periods in Chinese history. After her arrival in San Diego, California, in 1984, Liu became one of the first Chinese artists to establish a career in the United States. Decades later, she would be justly celebrated for establishing novel frameworks for understanding visual art’s relationship to history by focusing on communities misrepresented and marginalized by official narratives.

Liu experienced political revolution, exile, and displacement before immigrating to the United States. She came of age during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution (1966–76) and was consequently forced to labor in the fields in her early twenties. After studying art in Beijing, she left China to attend graduate school at the University of California, San Diego. There, the experimental tendencies of the students and faculty, most notably those of performance artist Allan Kaprow (1927–2006) and art historian Moira Roth (1933–2021), helped cultivate her conceptual approach to portraiture.

Featuring highly experimental painting, printing, and weaving techniques, Liu’s challenging yet accessible oeuvre has been aptly characterized by her husband, the art critic Jeff Kelley, as a species of “weeping realism.” Titled A Question of Hu, after China scholar Jonathan Spence’s 1988 book The Question of Hu, the exhibition reintroduces Liu’s remarkable art to the Pacific Northwest, while demonstrating—as few artistic oeuvres can—an expanded view of citizenship in an era of seismic change that is also fundamentally marked by evolving ideas of artistic solidarity and collaboration.

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“Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” brings together the artwork of Eugene Landry (1937-1988) with contemporary Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe artists and writers as they explore their cultural roots, tribal identity, and connection to ancestral land. Landry’s artwork offers a look at the political, economic, and cultural challenges the tribe faced during his lifetime—from near termination to federal recognition. Paralyzed by illness as a young man, Landry created his art from a wheelchair, using his non- dominant hand. Conversations with his former portrait models (now tribal elders), reveal his creative resilience and the positive impact he had in their young lives. Now, 35 years after Landry’s passing, a rediscovered collection of Landry’s art inspires a new generation of Shoalwater Bay artists. “Portrait of Eugene Landry—an Artist, a Time and a Tribe” will be on view at Astoria Visual Arts November 11 through December 2.

Nov 11, 5:00pm at AVA:
Artist talk/reading with curator Judith Altruda

Dec 2, 1:00pm at AVA:
Contemporary Shoalwater Bay Artists’ Panel Discussion

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Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to announce that we have teamed up with the City of Shoreline and the Spartan Recreation Center to host the Arte de la Raza exhibition running Nov.2nd-Jan. 24th and featuring:
Che Lopez
Iris Sanchez
Jake Prendez
Rolando Avila
Teresa Martinez
Yessica Marquez
The exhibition opens Nov. 2nd which is also the same day as their Dia de los Muertos Festival!!

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An anchor event for Converge 45’s citywide 2023 biennial, Social Forms: Art As Global Citizenship, the exhibition WE ARE THE REVOLUTION plumbs the depth of commitment of Jordan Schnitzer to the art of his time, while tapping into a living history of social expression through art in diverse media—fr