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Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery presents

JUSTICIA

Social Justice ART SHOW

From April 30-May 29th

Gallery Hours: Thursday – Sunday 12pm-6pm

www.nepantlaculturarts.com

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery presents

JUSTICIA

Social Justice ART SHOW

From April 30-May 29th

Gallery Hours: Thursday – Sunday 12pm-6pm

www.nepantlaculturarts.com

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery presents

JUSTICIA

Social Justice ART SHOW

From April 30-May 29th

Gallery Hours: Thursday – Sunday 12pm-6pm

www.nepantlaculturarts.com

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery presents

JUSTICIA

Social Justice ART SHOW

From April 30-May 29th

Gallery Hours: Thursday – Sunday 12pm-6pm

www.nepantlaculturarts.com

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event