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Attend festivals, performances, exhibits, workshops and more! Use simple filters to find specific types of events near you.

Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
El Centro de la Raza
virtual

Join us on Saturday, October 2nd for our 2021 Building the Beloved Community Gala and take part in an exciting livestream and online auction that raises funds for vital programs and services that benefit more than 21,000 individuals and families across our region. The evening also includes the presentation of our Roberto Felipe Maestas Legacy Awards & Scholarships. Registration is free and signing up takes just a few minutes

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Seattle Center Festál
virtual

Seattle Center Festál presents CroatiaFest in partnership with CroatiaFest. The festival is held annually on the first Sunday of October. The festival presents Croatian culture through music and dance performances by the finest Croatian musicians, singers and dance ensembles from the Pacific Northwest, Canada and beyond. Museum quality exhibits tell the story of the Croatian American immigrant experience through historical photos, artifacts, traditional costumes and folk instruments. Croatian gifts and merchandise are available for purchase from a variety of vendors in the marketplace. Attendees can enjoy cooking demonstrations of traditional foods by Croatian chefs. Numerous booths feature authentic Croatian cuisine, crafts for kids, genealogy and informative lectures and craft demonstrations. Visitors can enjoy a tasting of wines from various Croatian American vintners from Washington and California in the CroatiaFest Wine Cellars. The office of the Croatian Consulate assists with passports, visas and official government documents. Festivities begin in the Seattle Center Armory with opening ceremonies at noon.

This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Seattle Center Festál
virtual

Seattle Center Festál presents Turkfest in partnership with the Turkish American Cultural Association of Washington (TACAWA). The festival boasts a lively marketplace, food, music, dance, and more.

Turkfest is an annual cultural festival in Seattle, whose mission is to foster friendship, to highlight the diversity and richness of Turkish culture and Turkish speaking countries, and cooperate throughout the greater community by organizing educational, entertaining, and engaging cultural programs that celebrate Turkish and Turkic cultures and heritage.

This event is free and open to the public.

View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Seattle Center Festál
virtual

Seattle Center Festál presents Turkfest in partnership with the Turkish American Cultural Association of Washington (TACAWA). The festival boasts a lively marketplace, food, music, dance, and more.

Turkfest is an annual cultural festival in Seattle, whose mission is to foster friendship, to highlight the diversity and richness of Turkish culture and Turkish speaking countries, and cooperate throughout the greater community by organizing educational, entertaining, and engaging cultural programs that celebrate Turkish and Turkic cultures and heritage.

This event is free and open to the public.

View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Seattle Indian Health Board
virtual

Seattle Center Festál presents Indigenous People Festival in partnership with Seattle Indian Health Board (SIHB). The festival provides a venue for Native people to celebrate their unique cultures through song, dance, performances, art, food, and the sharing of indigenous knowledge.

View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event

The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection celebrates the achievements and contributions of Black Americans from 1595 to present times. Considered one of the most comprehensive surveys of African American history and culture outside the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition of the same name features the shared treasures amassed by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey during their five decades of marriage. The collection includes masterful paintings and sculpture, photographs, rare books, letters, manuscripts and more that offer a well-rounded look at the African American experience and provide new perspectives on the nation’s history and culture.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

On view at the Wing Luke Museum June 11, 2021 through April 17, 2022 in the George Tsutakawa Art Gallery.

Explore the inspiration, design, and fabrication process of public sculptures by Gerard Tsutakawa as well as their effect on Seattle physically, socially and culturally.

Self-Guided Walking Tour

How many Tsutakawa sculptures have you seen around Seattle? We’ve launched a brand new self-guided interactive walking tour of all of Gerry’s public works in the city. Visit familiar iconic sites and discover new ones you never knew existed.

View the walking tour map: digitalwingluke.org/tsutakawa-walking-tour

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection