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Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
IN-PERSON Meetings w/ Recruiters ATTENTION – SEATTLE Job and Career Seekers! 100’s of Employment Positions from Major Employers!

About this event

ATTENTION SEATTLE JOB SEEKERS AND CAREER CHANGERS!

The 21st Annual Diversity Employment Day Career Fair and Job Fair for Seattle and State of Washington

Invites you to meet In Person (IP)with Seattle’s major employers and their recruiters, staffing managers, and HR Directors who are seeking to hire for 100’s of Job and Career Positions on September 29th, 2021 from 11 AM to 3 PM.

Email your Resume to FastTrack@CityCareerFair.com with the subject: SEATTLE 2 IP and receive a confirmation code that allows you to join the Annual Diversity Employment Day Career Fair immediately. It is very IMPORTANT that you have the code in the subject line.

This is a professional-level online virtual event and business attire and résumés are required for admission.

This is a FREE event. Must be 18 years or older. Remember – “First Impressions are Lasting Impressions”. Although you may be taking your scheduled appointments in the casual and safe comforts of your home – “Look and Remain Professional” throughout your appointments for best results!

Employers – Reach out to prebook@citycareerfair.com for details regarding participation. Your participation fee helps to support Diversity in the workplace and community plus this Diversity & Inclusion recruiting event. Thank You – CityCareerFair.com

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
IN-PERSON Meetings w/ Recruiters ATTENTION – SEATTLE Job and Career Seekers! 100’s of Employment Positions from Major Employers!

About this event

ATTENTION SEATTLE JOB SEEKERS AND CAREER CHANGERS!

The 21st Annual Diversity Employment Day Career Fair and Job Fair for Seattle and State of Washington

Invites you to meet In Person (IP)with Seattle’s major employers and their recruiters, staffing managers, and HR Directors who are seeking to hire for 100’s of Job and Career Positions on September 29th, 2021 from 11 AM to 3 PM.

Email your Resume to FastTrack@CityCareerFair.com with the subject: SEATTLE 2 IP and receive a confirmation code that allows you to join the Annual Diversity Employment Day Career Fair immediately. It is very IMPORTANT that you have the code in the subject line.

This is a professional-level online virtual event and business attire and résumés are required for admission.

This is a FREE event. Must be 18 years or older. Remember – “First Impressions are Lasting Impressions”. Although you may be taking your scheduled appointments in the casual and safe comforts of your home – “Look and Remain Professional” throughout your appointments for best results!

Employers – Reach out to prebook@citycareerfair.com for details regarding participation. Your participation fee helps to support Diversity in the workplace and community plus this Diversity & Inclusion recruiting event. Thank You – CityCareerFair.com

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event

Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

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Crear Studio’s inaugural exhibition is a show featuring a timeline of work by local & renowned artist Albert Lopez, Jr.

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Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Seattle Latino Film Festival

Language: Spanish | English subtitles

Cast: Martín Slipak, Roberto Birindelli, Carlos Frasca, Verónica Perrotta, Jorge Temponi, Jenny Galvan, Guillermo Arengo, Josefina Trías, César Troncoso, Robert Moré

Overview: Claudio is the new insurance expert in a small town far from the capital. It seems like a simple job, but when he arrives, he is faced with the worst series of intentional car fires the town had ever seen. Cornered by clients, Claudio must discover what and who is behind the attacks, without being able to trust anything or anyone.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Seattle Latino Film Festival
Seattle, WA

Language: English
Cast: Fatima Ptacek, Melissa Leo, Mia Frampton, Mia Xitali, Cristela Alonzo, Ciara Bravo

Synopsis: Desperate to escape the trappings of her small coastal farming town, 16-year-old Abby falls for the lead singer of a touring rock band and must decide whether or not to leave her family and friends behind. With live music performances and an exciting ensemble cast, COAST is about female friendships, finding your truth and letting the music take you home.

View Event
Seattle Latino Film Festival
Seattle, WA

Language: Spanish | English subtitles
Cast: Luis Baralt

Synopsis: A grocer tries to save the radio that accompanied him for practically his entire life. His pilgrimage through the streets in search of a solution confronts him with a city that has accepted the disappearance of ways of life and the loss of scenes from the past in the memory.

View Event
Seattle Latino Film Festival
Seattle, WA

Language: Spanish & Italian | English subtitles
Cast: Claudia Rojas, Christian González, Erick Palacios, Diana Volpe, Alberto Alifa

Synopsis: Eugenia, 17, wants to leave chaotic and crisis-ridden Venezuela,. To obtain the long-awaited European passport, she goes on a 500 km road trip in search of her unknown Italian grandfather. Her road partner is Luis, an intriguing and inaccessible young man, with whom she lives a brief and tragic teen love. He accompanies her with promise of an appointment in Rome, 13 years later.

View Event
Seattle Latino Film Festival

Synopsis: This story follows Eva, a traveler who experiences some car trouble and ends up spending some time with a group of women in a hotel outside of town. These women gladly accept Eva in their home and make her feel at ease. Quickly, Eva discovers the secret that unifies these seven interesting women she has  met.  As relationships develop, an even deeper relationship  is formed between Eva and Liz. As they go on different adventures, Liz’s  long kept secret  is revealed and it takes a toll on everyone involved. It is worthy to note that there are not many male characters in this film. This leaves room for these women to show their own strengths and skills thereby revealing their true natures  as vibrant women living their lives.

Language : Spanish w/ English Subtitles

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Event
Organization
Location
Bainbridge Island Japanese-American Community (BIJAC)
, WA

Honor Thy Mother is the untold story of 36 Aboriginal women from Canada and Native women from tribes in Washington and Alaska who migrated to Bainbridge Island, the traditional territory of the Suquamish people, in the early 1940s. They came, some still in their teens, to pick berries for Japanese American farmers. Many, just released from the Indian Residential Schools, fell in love in the berry fields and married Filipino immigrants. Despite having left their homeland and possible disenfranchisement from their tribes, they settled on the Island to raise their mixed heritage (Indipino) children. The voices of the Indipino children, now elders, are integral in the storytelling of their mother’s experiences marrying Asian men and settling in a distant land. They share their confusion of growing up with no sense of belonging in either culture and raised in poverty as the children of berry farmers, some with no running water, electricity or indoor plumbing. In a post-World War II racist environment, they grew up in homes burdened with their father and mother’s memory of the 227 Bainbridge Island Japanese Americans forcibly removed from their homes after President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 on February 19th, 1942. Brought to light, in the oral history interviews of the Indipino elders, is the effect that historical trauma has on children, more specifically children whose mothers survived Indian Residential Schools.

Honor Thy Mother will be screened at the Bainbridge High School Theater Auditorium on October 10th at 3:45pm. Tickets are available now on Eventbrite. Tickets are free, but donations are gratefully accepted.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery examines how Finnish artists have depicted the landscape of their native country from the 1850s until the present day. The exhibition presents over 50 paintings and prints drawn from the Ateneum Art Museum, one of three museums that form the Finnish National Gallery. Selected scenes cover more than 150 years and 800 miles, with artworks capturing the splendor and grandeur of Finland from the coast and archipelago in the south to Sápmi and the Arctic Ocean in the north.

Organized into four themes, the exhibition shows the sophistication of the Finnish art establishment and the concurrent development of the landscape genre from idealized views completed in the artist’s studio to realistic scenes painted en plein air (“in the open air”) to visual expressions of the landscape in a modern artistic language. An important loan of video art from the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (also part of the Finnish National Gallery) strengthens the exhibition with the work of contemporary Sámi director, photographer, and video artist Marja Helander, who explores Finnish and Sámi culture through film.

Among Forests and Lakes: Landscape Masterpieces from the Finnish National Gallery is organized by the Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, and the National Nordic Museum. This exhibition is curated by the Finnish National Gallery’s Curator Dr. Hanne Selkokari and Senior Researcher Anu Utriainen. The presentation at the National Nordic Museum—the exclusive North American venue for the exhibition—is coordinated by Leslie Anne Anderson, Director of Collections, Exhibitions, and Programs.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Washington State Historical Society

As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition, and Plateau Art
On view through Nov 28, 2021
An exhibition from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA.

The art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River plateau reflects traditional lifeways borne of an ancient and interdependent relationship with the natural world. Women have been the primary makers of the functional forms necessary to everyday life; materials and techniques are time-honed, having been perfected over generations.

Though traditional ways of life have evolved, women still carry forward this knowledge. This exhibition celebrates the work of three contemporary Plateau women alongside historic objects and images from the collections of the NWMAC.

The featured artists in this exhibition are:

  • Leanne Campbell – Schi’tsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians), NiMiiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Sinixt (Arrow Lakes), P’squosa (Wenatchee), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation;
  • Bernadine Phillips – Spuqspálqs (Okanogan/Wenatchi), Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and
  • HollyAnna CougarTracks DeCoteau Littlebull – Yakama (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation), NiMíiPuu (Nez Perce Tribe), Cayuse (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation).
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Curated in collaboration with historian Peter Boag (Vancouver, Washington), the Washington State Historical Society is proud to present the original exhibition Crossing Boundaries: Portraits of a Transgender West.

This exhibition shares seldom-spotlighted historical narratives of transgender people in the West. It spans the time period of 1860 to 1940 and explores four central themes, connecting those histories to contemporary aspects of today’s LGBTQ+ community. Stories from the lives of specific individuals who did not conform to gender norms will illuminate the themes of visibility, identity, acceptance, and history.

Among the many people whose stories will be shared are Harry Allen, a heartbreaker who was wanted by the police; Dr. Alan Hart, a medical doctor and Northwest novelist; and the mysterious Mrs. Nash, a laundress to the famed Seventh Cavalry (and an officer’s wife).

While today we might think of the people represented in the exhibition as “transgender,” that term did not exist during their lifetimes. These individuals were the public face of the LGBTQ+ community at the turn of the twentieth century. They were the ones who appeared in the press (for reasons elaborated in the exhibition) and thus were the most widely recognized, identified, and accessible examples of LGBTQ+ identities during the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is one reason that the exhibition’s focus places transgender people as front and center in LGBTQ+ history.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

A View from Above: Bird’s-Eye Maps from the WSHS Collection 

Bird’s-eye view (also known as panoramic) maps were drawn to give the viewer a sense of looking down at a city and its major features as if they were flying above it. Popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these maps were mass-produced and represented American cities and villages of all sizes and from all parts of the country. At a time when many Americans were immigrants for whom English was not a first language, these views told stories that printed broadsides and newspapers could not and thus also became a popular medium for advertisers and city boosters. By the 1930s, the invention of the airplane led to aerial photographs that gradually supplanted these elaborately illustrated maps. 

A View from Above showcases some of the many panoramic maps in the Historical Society’s collections, including those printed during the heyday of the art as well as more modern images influenced by this technique. These maps reflect a broad spectrum of Washington cities and towns both before and after statehood. The illustrations showcase the talents of commercial artists of the time. This exhibition also features a selection of objects connected to surveying, mapmaking, and commercial illustration.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

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Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts
Sept 17, 2021 – Jan 23, 2022
A traveling exhibition from the American Folk Art Museum in New York, NY.

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends. Spanning the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, the exhibition brings together a collection of quilts from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum that represents a range of materials, motifs, and techniques—from traditional early-American quilts to more contemporary sculptural assemblage.

Exhibition curator: Sarah Margolis-Pineo, assistant curator, Self-Taught Genius Gallery, American Folk Art Museum

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HAMILTON is the story of America then, told by America now. Featuring a score that blends hip-hop, jazz, R&B and Broadway, HAMILTON has taken the story of American founding father Alexander Hamilton and created a revolutionary moment in theatre—a musical that has had a profound impact on culture, politics, and education. With book, music, and lyrics by Lin-Manuel Miranda, direction by Thomas Kail, choreography by Andy Blankenbuehler, and musical supervision and orchestrations by Alex Lacamoire, HAMILTON is based on Ron Chernow’s acclaimed biography. It has won Tony®, Grammy®, and Olivier Awards, the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, and an unprecedented special citation from the Kennedy Center Honors.

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