How to use this calendar

Click a date on the calendar or search by location and event type.

Community Focus

Culture

Experiences

Faith

Gender & Sexuality

People with Disabilities

Multicultural

Washington

Oregon

Idaho

Alaska

Event Categories
Date/Location

Events on or after

Events within these regions

Calendar

Attend festivals, performances, exhibits, workshops and more! Use simple filters to find specific types of events near you.

Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Boise Soul Food Festival
, WA

The mission of the Boise Soul Food Festival is to educate and grow the Boise African American culture for present and future generations.

The Soul Food Festival’s purpose is to celebrate and educate the greater Treasure Valley region about African-American culture in order to enhance and nurture racial understanding and harmony within the community.

Our programs include an annual Soul Food Festival that showcases African-American inspired soul food, music, dancing, and businesses. The festival may include workshops or demonstrations to educate the public about African-American history, traditional dances and music, hair care, and/or current social justice issues.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Sankofa Film Society & Theatre
Seattle, WA
Before Oprah, before Arsenio, there was Mr. SOUL! Ellis Haizlip ensures the Revolution will be televised with “SOUL!,” America’s first “Black Tonight Show.”
From 1968 to 1973, the public-television variety show SOUL!, guided by enigmatic producer and host Ellis Haizlip, offered an unfiltered, uncompromising celebration of Black literature, poetry, music, and politics–voices that had few other options for national exposure, and, as a result, found the program an improbable place to call home. The series was among the first to provide expanded images of African Americans on television, shifting the gaze from inner-city poverty and violence to the vibrancy of the Black Arts Movement. With participants’ recollections and illuminating archival clips, Mr. SOUL captures a critical moment in culture whose impact continues to resonate, and an unsung hero whose voice we need now more than ever, to restore the SOUL of a nation.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Northwest African American Museum (NAAM)

Enjoy a reading of A Name Like Mine: A Rhyming Story About Diversity & Inclusion. This book discusses one of the simplest ways of showing a sign of respect – learning how to say someone’s name correctly! A Name Like Mine will build the confidence of uniquely named children in addition to teaching everyone about the importance of learning to pronounce names correctly. This program is sponsored by PNC Bank.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event

The “Creative Pipeline” is a new workforce development program launching in Seattle in September with the opening of the William Grose Center for Culture Innovation & Enterprise. The Creative Pipeline is made possible by the Africatown Community Land Trust and is centered on creating internships that better connect the region’s advertising and commercial production agencies to emerging Black, Indigenous and creatives of color.

This event is aimed at local agency leaders to learn more about how the program will work and how their companies can participate. TraeAnna Holiday, of King County Equity Now and Converge Media, will be giving an overview of the Creative Pipeline and will be joined by advertising industry leaders who will share their experience implementing internship programs.

Guest include:
Sheila Brown, Vice President, Equity & Inclusion at AICP
Tony Fulgham, Founder and CEO at All is Well
Chris Witherspoon, President and CEO at DNA

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Brothers United in Leadership Development (BUILD)
Seattle, WA

Join BUILD as we bring movies featuring Black leads and/or Black Stories back to the community. Our partner, Ark Lodge Cinemas, is helping us continue this initiative with One Night in Miami, directed by Regina King.

This event is completely FREE and open to the community. One (1) free small popcorn and a small drink will be provided with your RSVP. Space is limited, so RSVP early.

This movie is rated R. Community members must be 18+ for entry into the cinema.

Please only RSVP for the tickets you need.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
The New Generation 2.0
Tacoma , WA
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
The New Generation 2.0
Tacoma , WA
Sunday, August 21, 2022
206 Zulu Presents A Conversation & Workshop With
GRANDWIZZARD THEODORE
(Hip Hop Pioneer and Inventor of the Scratch)
Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave, Seattle, WA
Limited Availability. Tickets release July 25, 2022.
2pm | $15 | All-Ages
ABOUT GRANDWIZZARD THEODORE
One of early hip-hop’s most skilled DJs, Grand Wizard Theodore is universally acknowledged as the inventor of the scratch. Grandmaster Flash pioneered many early turntable techniques, including “cutting” records (manually cueing up duplicate copies of the same record in order to play the same passage, cutting back and forth between them), but it was the young Theodore who built on Flash’s work by taking the scratching sound made when the records were cued, and adding a rhythm that made the turntable into a percussion instrument the DJ could “play.” Theodore is also credited with pioneering the needle drop, a technique where, instead of cueing up the record silently, the DJ simply drops the needle onto the exact start of the passage to be played. Grand Wizard Theodore was born Theodore Livingstone and grew up in the Bronx. His older brothers Gene and Claudio were an early hip-hop duo called the L-Brothers, and they frequently collaborated with Grandmaster Flash. Flash discovered that young Theodore (not even a teenager yet) had a natural affinity for the turntables, and when Flash spun records in public parks, he would sometimes set up a milk crate to let Theodore DJ. According to legend, Theodore invented scratching largely by accident, circa 1977 (when he was about 13 or 14); holed up in his bedroom playing records, Theodore had to pause to hear his mother scold him about the volume, and happened to move one of the records back and forth. He liked the sound and played with it often, developing the technique until it was ready for public performance. Flash picked up on it quickly, and Theodore in turn began copying Flash’s acrobatic record-spinning tricks (using his elbows, feet, etc.). By the time the ’80s rolled around, Grand Wizard Theodore was one of the top DJs in New York. He hooked up with a crew that was most often billed as Grand Wizard Theodore and the Fantastic 5 MCs, which released the cult classic single “Can I Get a Soul Clap” in 1980 on the Tuff City label. The group never recorded a proper album, but they did appear in the 1983 old school hip-hop film Wild Style (which later became a cult classic); they recorded several songs on the soundtrack and appeared in an MC battle sequence with their chief rivals the Cold Crush Brothers. While Grand Wizard Theodore never received the same wide acclaim as Grandmaster Flash during his career, he was eventually rediscovered by hip-hop historians, which helped him land some international DJ gigs in the ’90s. He also appeared at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 1999 hip-hop conference, and teaches advanced classes in the art of DJing.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Northwest African American Museum (NAAM)
Seattle, WA

To celebrate the 100th centennial anniversary of Garfield High School, NAAM serve as a community partner and have a Knowledge is Power table featuring 100 books to gift to children and young adults of ages.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Brothers United in Leadership Development (BUILD)
Seattle, WA

Come out and “Kick it” with us as we BUILD community by playing Kickball with friends, family, and community.

This event is open to all ages. No hidden agendas we are just trying to BUILD Community!

Volunteers are Needed – Sign up to volunteer at: https://forms.gle/oufqJF8yy5j5rAd77

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Langston
Seattle, WA

Langston Seattle and Three Dollar Bill Cinema partner together to present Prince’s classic movie musical Purple Rain. Free and open for the public, pack a picnic and join us for drag performances, trivia games, and of course, singing!

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
The New Generation 2.0
Tacoma , WA
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
The New Generation 2.0
Tacoma , WA
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event