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Step into a world of fantasy and fairytale at the 2023 Children’s Film Festival Seattle! Expect fantastical films, wondrous workshops, and spectacular special events. Since 2005, CFFS has provided a joyous and dynamic setting to celebrate the best and brightest in international film programs for children and families! It is the largest film fest on the West Coast dedicated to children and their families.
HOW VIRTUAL WORKS:
All CFFS 2023 film programs (excluding Workshops and Opening and Closing Night films) will be hosted online, via Northwest Film Forum’s Eventive platform, at bit.ly/cffs2023online. Each program is available to view on-demand from Feb. 3–12. Tickets are priced on a sliding scale, from $5–25, with no one turned away for lack of funds. (Email paul [at] nwfilmforum {dot} org about free community tickets!). HOW IN-PERSON WORKS:
In addition to being viewable on demand from Feb. 3–12 on Eventive, each event in the festival has at least one in-person showtime at our cinema on Capitol Hill (1515 12th Ave, Seattle). Browse the full calendar at bit.ly/cffs2023! View chronologically at nwfilmforum.org/calendar/?start=2023-02-03
In-person screenings are priced like any other regular screening at NWFF: $14 General, $7 NWFF Members, $10 Student (w/ ID) / Child (under 12) / Senior (over 62).

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Spokane International Film Festival (SpIFF)
Spokane, WA

The Spokane International Film Festival is an intimate festival where filmmakers and audiences engage the art of cinema. We offer a small, selective offering of world-class films. These are the very best features, documentaries, and shorts that have been made around the world during the past year but have not yet been commercially released for wide distribution. SpIFF hosts a variety of parties, events, and filmmaker panels that are open to the public and encourage lively and educational interactions between filmmakers and our audiences.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
Seattle Arts and Lectures
Seattle, WA

Join SAL and Marguerite Casey Foundation for a free event celebrating the publication of Ross Gay’s Inciting Joy, an intimate and electrifying collection of essays from the New York Times bestselling author of The Book of Delights. In these gorgeously written and timely pieces, Gay considers the joy we incite when we care for each other, especially during life’s inevitable hardships. Throughout Inciting Joy, Gay explores how we can practice recognizing that connection, and also, crucially, how we expand it.
This event is free and open to the public; however, registration is required to attend. Please RSVP in advance.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Step into a world of fantasy and fairytale at the 2023 Children’s Film Festival Seattle! Expect fantastical films, wondrous workshops, and spectacular special events. Since 2005, CFFS has provided a joyous and dynamic setting to celebrate the best and brightest in international film programs for children and families! It is the largest film fest on the West Coast dedicated to children and their families.
HOW VIRTUAL WORKS:
All CFFS 2023 film programs (excluding Workshops and Opening and Closing Night films) will be hosted online, via Northwest Film Forum’s Eventive platform, at bit.ly/cffs2023online. Each program is available to view on-demand from Feb. 3–12. Tickets are priced on a sliding scale, from $5–25, with no one turned away for lack of funds. (Email paul [at] nwfilmforum {dot} org about free community tickets!). HOW IN-PERSON WORKS:
In addition to being viewable on demand from Feb. 3–12 on Eventive, each event in the festival has at least one in-person showtime at our cinema on Capitol Hill (1515 12th Ave, Seattle). Browse the full calendar at bit.ly/cffs2023! View chronologically at nwfilmforum.org/calendar/?start=2023-02-03
In-person screenings are priced like any other regular screening at NWFF: $14 General, $7 NWFF Members, $10 Student (w/ ID) / Child (under 12) / Senior (over 62).

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Spokane International Film Festival (SpIFF)
Spokane, WA

The Spokane International Film Festival is an intimate festival where filmmakers and audiences engage the art of cinema. We offer a small, selective offering of world-class films. These are the very best features, documentaries, and shorts that have been made around the world during the past year but have not yet been commercially released for wide distribution. SpIFF hosts a variety of parties, events, and filmmaker panels that are open to the public and encourage lively and educational interactions between filmmakers and our audiences.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Step into a world of fantasy and fairytale at the 2023 Children’s Film Festival Seattle! Expect fantastical films, wondrous workshops, and spectacular special events. Since 2005, CFFS has provided a joyous and dynamic setting to celebrate the best and brightest in international film programs for children and families! It is the largest film fest on the West Coast dedicated to children and their families.
HOW VIRTUAL WORKS:
All CFFS 2023 film programs (excluding Workshops and Opening and Closing Night films) will be hosted online, via Northwest Film Forum’s Eventive platform, at bit.ly/cffs2023online. Each program is available to view on-demand from Feb. 3–12. Tickets are priced on a sliding scale, from $5–25, with no one turned away for lack of funds. (Email paul [at] nwfilmforum {dot} org about free community tickets!). HOW IN-PERSON WORKS:
In addition to being viewable on demand from Feb. 3–12 on Eventive, each event in the festival has at least one in-person showtime at our cinema on Capitol Hill (1515 12th Ave, Seattle). Browse the full calendar at bit.ly/cffs2023! View chronologically at nwfilmforum.org/calendar/?start=2023-02-03
In-person screenings are priced like any other regular screening at NWFF: $14 General, $7 NWFF Members, $10 Student (w/ ID) / Child (under 12) / Senior (over 62).

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Spokane International Film Festival (SpIFF)
Spokane, WA

The Spokane International Film Festival is an intimate festival where filmmakers and audiences engage the art of cinema. We offer a small, selective offering of world-class films. These are the very best features, documentaries, and shorts that have been made around the world during the past year but have not yet been commercially released for wide distribution. SpIFF hosts a variety of parties, events, and filmmaker panels that are open to the public and encourage lively and educational interactions between filmmakers and our audiences.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
Northwest African American Museum (NAAM)
Seattle, WA

NAAM’s African American Cultural Ensemble (ACE) will perform the anthems at Seattle University’s men’s basketball game. Ticket purchase is required.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Step into a world of fantasy and fairytale at the 2023 Children’s Film Festival Seattle! Expect fantastical films, wondrous workshops, and spectacular special events. Since 2005, CFFS has provided a joyous and dynamic setting to celebrate the best and brightest in international film programs for children and families! It is the largest film fest on the West Coast dedicated to children and their families.
HOW VIRTUAL WORKS:
All CFFS 2023 film programs (excluding Workshops and Opening and Closing Night films) will be hosted online, via Northwest Film Forum’s Eventive platform, at bit.ly/cffs2023online. Each program is available to view on-demand from Feb. 3–12. Tickets are priced on a sliding scale, from $5–25, with no one turned away for lack of funds. (Email paul [at] nwfilmforum {dot} org about free community tickets!). HOW IN-PERSON WORKS:
In addition to being viewable on demand from Feb. 3–12 on Eventive, each event in the festival has at least one in-person showtime at our cinema on Capitol Hill (1515 12th Ave, Seattle). Browse the full calendar at bit.ly/cffs2023! View chronologically at nwfilmforum.org/calendar/?start=2023-02-03
In-person screenings are priced like any other regular screening at NWFF: $14 General, $7 NWFF Members, $10 Student (w/ ID) / Child (under 12) / Senior (over 62).

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Spokane International Film Festival (SpIFF)
Spokane, WA

The Spokane International Film Festival is an intimate festival where filmmakers and audiences engage the art of cinema. We offer a small, selective offering of world-class films. These are the very best features, documentaries, and shorts that have been made around the world during the past year but have not yet been commercially released for wide distribution. SpIFF hosts a variety of parties, events, and filmmaker panels that are open to the public and encourage lively and educational interactions between filmmakers and our audiences.

View Event
National Nordic Museum
Seattle, WA

The Sámi Film Festival originated as a partnership between the National Nordic Museum and Pacific Sámi Searvi in 2018. Since that time, it has become an onsite event drawing audiences from the East and West Coasts and an online event sharing Sámi film with a global audience.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event

After incarceration, how do you reenter a society that doesn’t offer open arms? Reginald Dwayne Betts is an award-winning author, poet, lawyer, and outspoken advocate for criminal justice reform, whose work interrogates and challenges our notions of justice.
Betts has adapted his celebrated poetry collection, Felon, into a one-man performance piece, which he will perform for this SAL Presents event. Q&A with Stacy D. Flood.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Step into a world of fantasy and fairytale at the 2023 Children’s Film Festival Seattle! Expect fantastical films, wondrous workshops, and spectacular special events. Since 2005, CFFS has provided a joyous and dynamic setting to celebrate the best and brightest in international film programs for children and families! It is the largest film fest on the West Coast dedicated to children and their families.
HOW VIRTUAL WORKS:
All CFFS 2023 film programs (excluding Workshops and Opening and Closing Night films) will be hosted online, via Northwest Film Forum’s Eventive platform, at bit.ly/cffs2023online. Each program is available to view on-demand from Feb. 3–12. Tickets are priced on a sliding scale, from $5–25, with no one turned away for lack of funds. (Email paul [at] nwfilmforum {dot} org about free community tickets!). HOW IN-PERSON WORKS:
In addition to being viewable on demand from Feb. 3–12 on Eventive, each event in the festival has at least one in-person showtime at our cinema on Capitol Hill (1515 12th Ave, Seattle). Browse the full calendar at bit.ly/cffs2023! View chronologically at nwfilmforum.org/calendar/?start=2023-02-03
In-person screenings are priced like any other regular screening at NWFF: $14 General, $7 NWFF Members, $10 Student (w/ ID) / Child (under 12) / Senior (over 62).

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
National Nordic Museum
Seattle, WA

The Sámi Film Festival originated as a partnership between the National Nordic Museum and Pacific Sámi Searvi in 2018. Since that time, it has become an onsite event drawing audiences from the East and West Coasts and an online event sharing Sámi film with a global audience.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
Wa Na Wari
Seattle, WA

Attention all singles, Wa Na Wari and Soulma Ayers will be HOSTING a fun and much needed Singles Game Night & Mixer. Featuring Dj Topspin A.K.A Blendiana Jones to keep the vibes overflowing.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Step into a world of fantasy and fairytale at the 2023 Children’s Film Festival Seattle! Expect fantastical films, wondrous workshops, and spectacular special events. Since 2005, CFFS has provided a joyous and dynamic setting to celebrate the best and brightest in international film programs for children and families! It is the largest film fest on the West Coast dedicated to children and their families.
HOW VIRTUAL WORKS:
All CFFS 2023 film programs (excluding Workshops and Opening and Closing Night films) will be hosted online, via Northwest Film Forum’s Eventive platform, at bit.ly/cffs2023online. Each program is available to view on-demand from Feb. 3–12. Tickets are priced on a sliding scale, from $5–25, with no one turned away for lack of funds. (Email paul [at] nwfilmforum {dot} org about free community tickets!). HOW IN-PERSON WORKS:
In addition to being viewable on demand from Feb. 3–12 on Eventive, each event in the festival has at least one in-person showtime at our cinema on Capitol Hill (1515 12th Ave, Seattle). Browse the full calendar at bit.ly/cffs2023! View chronologically at nwfilmforum.org/calendar/?start=2023-02-03
In-person screenings are priced like any other regular screening at NWFF: $14 General, $7 NWFF Members, $10 Student (w/ ID) / Child (under 12) / Senior (over 62).

View Event
Idaho Black Community Alliance
Nampa, ID

In celebration of Black History Month, the Idaho BCA would like to invite you to a Gospel Workshop and Concert. A community event celebrating culture, music, education, food, singing, and fun for all.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
National Nordic Museum
Seattle, WA

The Sámi Film Festival originated as a partnership between the National Nordic Museum and Pacific Sámi Searvi in 2018. Since that time, it has become an onsite event drawing audiences from the East and West Coasts and an online event sharing Sámi film with a global audience.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

The in-person class is full. But we welcome you to join on Facebook Live.

BSNC is pleased to host an Alaska Native Dance Workshop for shareholders and registered descendants taught by the King Island Dancers of Anchorage. The classes will take place on Saturdays Feb. 4, Feb. 11 and Feb. 18 from 2:00PM – 3:00PM PST at the BSNC Anchorage office, 3301 C Street, Suite 100. If you are interested in participating, please email cona@beringstraits.com. Space is limited.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
Black Community Of Portland (BCP)
Beaverton, OR

Black Love Day is an international holiday. The intention behind Black Love Day is to express and show love to black people, ourselves, and one another. To show love for the black race and black culture and to encourage and uplift the very community that you are a part of.

The Black Community of Portland has been hosting a Black Love Day celebration going on 6 years!! For our 6th Anniversary, we are hosting a silent auction that will showcase local artwork for purchase.

The funds raised will contribute to the operating budget for the Black Community of Portland (BCP). BCP was developed to be self-sufficient and ensure that Portland’s Black Community Members are obtaining the resources that are said to be specifically for us. Our community meetings are a safe space to strengthen our unity and have the hard conversations.

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GlobalLounge
Boise, ID

Join us in a fun night of Latin music as we dance to the beats of Salsa, Bachata, Timba, Zouk and other Latin dance tunes.

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Event
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Location

Step into a world of fantasy and fairytale at the 2023 Children’s Film Festival Seattle! Expect fantastical films, wondrous workshops, and spectacular special events. Since 2005, CFFS has provided a joyous and dynamic setting to celebrate the best and brightest in international film programs for children and families! It is the largest film fest on the West Coast dedicated to children and their families.
HOW VIRTUAL WORKS:
All CFFS 2023 film programs (excluding Workshops and Opening and Closing Night films) will be hosted online, via Northwest Film Forum’s Eventive platform, at bit.ly/cffs2023online. Each program is available to view on-demand from Feb. 3–12. Tickets are priced on a sliding scale, from $5–25, with no one turned away for lack of funds. (Email paul [at] nwfilmforum {dot} org about free community tickets!). HOW IN-PERSON WORKS:
In addition to being viewable on demand from Feb. 3–12 on Eventive, each event in the festival has at least one in-person showtime at our cinema on Capitol Hill (1515 12th Ave, Seattle). Browse the full calendar at bit.ly/cffs2023! View chronologically at nwfilmforum.org/calendar/?start=2023-02-03
In-person screenings are priced like any other regular screening at NWFF: $14 General, $7 NWFF Members, $10 Student (w/ ID) / Child (under 12) / Senior (over 62).

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

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Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
National Nordic Museum
Seattle, WA

The Sámi Film Festival originated as a partnership between the National Nordic Museum and Pacific Sámi Searvi in 2018. Since that time, it has become an onsite event drawing audiences from the East and West Coasts and an online event sharing Sámi film with a global audience.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event
Northwest African American Museum (NAAM)
Seattle, WA

This book explores the creative adventures of the young Jacob Lawrence as he finds inspiration in the vibrant colors and characters of his community. It was written by Sharifa Rhodes-Pitt. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Uw7FCHYyXA

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
Transformative Shifts
Seattle, WA

Music is magic. Sound generate shifts within a space, dynamic, team or within yourself. Playing the right note adjust the right time can be soothing, healing, and releasing. Through conversation, intuitive readings, and sound we will release what stuck; creating an opportunity to feel in the flow.

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Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

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Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

The Northwest African American Museum is partnering with the University of Washington Libraries’ Special Collections to offer two Research and Writing Workshops in February for Black History Month. The Research and Writing Workshops will be held in person on February 15, 2023 and February 22, 2023 at the University of Washington Special Collections Classrooms. During the workshops, UW faculty will provide instruction on how to conduct archival research and utilize UW’s Special Collections Virtual Reading Room. The instruction and research scavenger hunt will utilize resources that relate to Black History such as the zines in UW’s Collections that relate to the Civil Rights Movement. NAAM will provide an introduction and short background lesson on Black History Month and its celebration in the Pacific Northwest. NAAM’s Education & Engagement Director, Cali Slair, PhD, along with UW librarians and graduate students will assist students with research and writing assignments for the final portion of the workshop. Each workshop will be 3 hours in length and students will be able to attend in person and virtually. The first workshop will be for high school students and the second workshop will be for college students. The maximum number of students able to attend in person is 30 due to the classroom size. Registration is required for attendance.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event

Peabody Award-winning host Krista Tippett presents a live, in-person recording of the wildly popular On Being podcast, featuring guest speaker Isabel Wilkerson. Wilkerson, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Humanities Medal, has become a leading figure in narrative nonfiction with The Warmth of Other Suns and Caste. Join these two friends and interpreters of the human condition for a night of incredible conversation.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
PDX Jazz
Portland, OR

The Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is a two-week multi-venue celebration of jazz, ‘live’ concerts and education events, presented each February in Portland, Oregon. Nationally and regionally supported as a cultural tourism initiative in celebration of Black History Month, the Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is dedicated to evolving America’s indigenous art form, featuring recognized jazz masters and rising jazz stars, alongside local jazz heroes.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
PDX Jazz
Portland, OR

The Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is a two-week multi-venue celebration of jazz, ‘live’ concerts and education events, presented each February in Portland, Oregon. Nationally and regionally supported as a cultural tourism initiative in celebration of Black History Month, the Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is dedicated to evolving America’s indigenous art form, featuring recognized jazz masters and rising jazz stars, alongside local jazz heroes.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
Social Justice Fund NW
Seattle, WA

The SJF Team is excited to share space with you on Friday, February 17th! We’ll have fun, games, and community building, get a little sentimental about recent accomplishments and growth, and share some news about the year ahead. The event is not a fundraiser but an opportunity for us to play games, share accomplishments, see familiar faces, and build community.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
Alaska Black Caucus
Anchorage, AK

Continuing the legacy of the late state senator Bettye Davis, the Alaska Black Caucus proudly presents the annual Bettye Davis African American Summit. This event brings together the Black community and other people of color in conversation and action to make Alaska a better place for everyone.

The Summit provides a forum for the Black community to educate policy makers and the public about not just the issues facing BIPOC people but also the solutions we want to see. The Summit addresses critical issues of public policy in the areas of economics, justice, education, and health. It is the principal gathering place, idea generator, and voice for the Black community in Alaska. You don’t want to miss it!

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
PDX Jazz
Portland, OR

The Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is a two-week multi-venue celebration of jazz, ‘live’ concerts and education events, presented each February in Portland, Oregon. Nationally and regionally supported as a cultural tourism initiative in celebration of Black History Month, the Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is dedicated to evolving America’s indigenous art form, featuring recognized jazz masters and rising jazz stars, alongside local jazz heroes.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

The in-person class is full. But we welcome you to join on Facebook Live.

BSNC is pleased to host an Alaska Native Dance Workshop for shareholders and registered descendants taught by the King Island Dancers of Anchorage. The classes will take place on Saturdays Feb. 4, Feb. 11 and Feb. 18 from 2:00PM – 3:00PM PST at the BSNC Anchorage office, 3301 C Street, Suite 100. If you are interested in participating, please email cona@beringstraits.com. Space is limited.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
National Nordic Museum
Seattle, WA

Are you a lover of all things Icelandic and have a taste for unique and fantastic experiences? Come celebrate Þorrablót, Iceland’s midwinter feast, and enjoy traditional food and drink, along with a night of singing and dancing to live music! Meet, eat, drink, and have fun like an Icelander! Dance the night away with a vivid demonstration of Icelandic magic, food, and fun.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
PDX Jazz
Portland, OR

The Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is a two-week multi-venue celebration of jazz, ‘live’ concerts and education events, presented each February in Portland, Oregon. Nationally and regionally supported as a cultural tourism initiative in celebration of Black History Month, the Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is dedicated to evolving America’s indigenous art form, featuring recognized jazz masters and rising jazz stars, alongside local jazz heroes.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event
Portland JACL
Portland, OR

Portland will host a screening of No-No Girl followed by an interview with the director and artists. Before being uprooted and forcibly removed, many Japanese American families resorted to burying belongings in their backyards thinking- one day they’d be back.
No No Girl is a generational, Japanese American story that intersects ideas of identity, family, duty and the traumas of war and relocation. Almost a century removed from WWII and the incarceration of her ancestors, one young daughter will take it upon herself to shine a light on their past and uncover the mysteries that have been haunting their family.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
PDX Jazz
Portland, OR

The Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is a two-week multi-venue celebration of jazz, ‘live’ concerts and education events, presented each February in Portland, Oregon. Nationally and regionally supported as a cultural tourism initiative in celebration of Black History Month, the Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is dedicated to evolving America’s indigenous art form, featuring recognized jazz masters and rising jazz stars, alongside local jazz heroes.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

Indigenous history through ledger art by Robert Upham. This is a 3-day event held at Tahoma Indian Center. February 20th, 22nd and 24th, 1:00pm to 3:00pm each day. Must RSVP to attend, only 12 spots available.
To learn more about Robert Upham and his work, his website is provided below. http://www.sacredpointofview.com/about/

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
PDX Jazz
Portland, OR

The Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is a two-week multi-venue celebration of jazz, ‘live’ concerts and education events, presented each February in Portland, Oregon. Nationally and regionally supported as a cultural tourism initiative in celebration of Black History Month, the Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is dedicated to evolving America’s indigenous art form, featuring recognized jazz masters and rising jazz stars, alongside local jazz heroes.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

Tidwell Social Work Multicultural Community Dinner is the third Tuesday of every month at the Global Lounge Commons. We would love to have you join us for the wonderful evening, celebrating the food of different cultures each month.
This event is always free and child-friendly and always starts at 6pm.
Please feel free to bring a side dish or dessert to share.
Each month will bring new cultural experiences with food, possibly music and always laughter!

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Idaho Office for Refugees
Boise, ID

A two-day conference geared toward professionals working with refugees in Idaho. Workshops are curated to present avenues of advocacy, increase community capacity, expand cultural awareness, and provide continuing education credits for eligible professions. Keynote, local artist performances and plenary sessions will be inspirational and visionary. This year, registration includes built-in networking opportunities and a full breakfast and lunch for both days with many vegetarian, vegan and gluten free options! A special Neighbors United Reception is planned for Wednesday, Feb. 22nd, 4:30-6:30pm at Boise State’s new Visual Arts Center- all registrants are welcome!

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
PDX Jazz
Portland, OR

The Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is a two-week multi-venue celebration of jazz, ‘live’ concerts and education events, presented each February in Portland, Oregon. Nationally and regionally supported as a cultural tourism initiative in celebration of Black History Month, the Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is dedicated to evolving America’s indigenous art form, featuring recognized jazz masters and rising jazz stars, alongside local jazz heroes.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

The Northwest African American Museum is partnering with the University of Washington Libraries’ Special Collections to offer two Research and Writing Workshops in February for Black History Month. The Research and Writing Workshops will be held in person on February 15, 2023 and February 22, 2023 at the University of Washington Special Collections Classrooms. During the workshops, UW faculty will provide instruction on how to conduct archival research and utilize UW’s Special Collections Virtual Reading Room. The instruction and research scavenger hunt will utilize resources that relate to Black History such as the zines in UW’s Collections that relate to the Civil Rights Movement. NAAM will provide an introduction and short background lesson on Black History Month and its celebration in the Pacific Northwest. NAAM’s Education & Engagement Director, Cali Slair, PhD, along with UW librarians and graduate students will assist students with research and writing assignments for the final portion of the workshop. Each workshop will be 3 hours in length and students will be able to attend in person and virtually. The first workshop will be for high school students and the second workshop will be for college students. The maximum number of students able to attend in person is 30 due to the classroom size. Registration is required for attendance.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Seattle Asian American Film Festival (SAAFF)
Seattle, WA

SAAFF is the only film festival to provide a space for pan-Asian American voices, perspectives, and histories told through multimedia arts in Seattle. Our volunteer-run organization empowers and uplifts Asian American creatives and builds community connections through our annual festival and other year-round events. We aim to be a platform that broadens the understanding of our community’s stories through elevating independent films that reflect the diversity and richness of Asian Americana and Asian diasporas.

View Event
Idaho Office for Refugees
Boise, ID

A two-day conference geared toward professionals working with refugees in Idaho. Workshops are curated to present avenues of advocacy, increase community capacity, expand cultural awareness, and provide continuing education credits for eligible professions. Keynote, local artist performances and plenary sessions will be inspirational and visionary. This year, registration includes built-in networking opportunities and a full breakfast and lunch for both days with many vegetarian, vegan and gluten free options! A special Neighbors United Reception is planned for Wednesday, Feb. 22nd, 4:30-6:30pm at Boise State’s new Visual Arts Center- all registrants are welcome!

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
PDX Jazz
Portland, OR

The Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is a two-week multi-venue celebration of jazz, ‘live’ concerts and education events, presented each February in Portland, Oregon. Nationally and regionally supported as a cultural tourism initiative in celebration of Black History Month, the Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is dedicated to evolving America’s indigenous art form, featuring recognized jazz masters and rising jazz stars, alongside local jazz heroes.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Seattle Asian American Film Festival (SAAFF)
Seattle, WA

SAAFF is the only film festival to provide a space for pan-Asian American voices, perspectives, and histories told through multimedia arts in Seattle. Our volunteer-run organization empowers and uplifts Asian American creatives and builds community connections through our annual festival and other year-round events. We aim to be a platform that broadens the understanding of our community’s stories through elevating independent films that reflect the diversity and richness of Asian Americana and Asian diasporas.

View Event

Celebrate the flavors of African-American, African, and Caribbean cuisine for the 3rd annual Northwest Black Restaurant Week. Black Restaurant Week is showcasing Black-owned restaurants and culinary businesses across the Northwest region. Dine at one of the participating restaurants offering a special Black Restaurant Week menu.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

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Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
PDX Jazz
Portland, OR

The Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is a two-week multi-venue celebration of jazz, ‘live’ concerts and education events, presented each February in Portland, Oregon. Nationally and regionally supported as a cultural tourism initiative in celebration of Black History Month, the Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is dedicated to evolving America’s indigenous art form, featuring recognized jazz masters and rising jazz stars, alongside local jazz heroes.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event
Native Youth Olympic (NYO) Games
Anchorage, AK

Our Alaska Native ancestors developed traditional contests to develop abilities crucial to everyday life. Competition with one another honed the abilities needed to successfully hunt and fish for daily survival in the traditional way of life. The creators of the NYO Games wanted to demonstrate these skills and preserve the traditional contests and culture of their forefathers. This vision has been realized and is now witnessed by people worldwide thanks to the involvement of many dedicated student athletes, coaches, volunteers, and the support of generous corporate sponsors and individual donors.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

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Who hasn’t been held captive by a powerful, funny, or frightening story?  7 STORIES are nights filled with  such storytelling – to build community, empathy, and celebrate our diversity.

Each 7 STORIES night has a theme and storytellers sign up and are selected in advance. Real stories are spellbinding and raw. They are not a theatrical performance, but true life stories from your friends, acquaintances, or someone you have never met.  These stories are told from the heart. Each program is introduced by our host for the evening, with a short bio of each storyteller.

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Event
Organization
Location
Seattle Asian American Film Festival (SAAFF)
Seattle, WA

SAAFF is the only film festival to provide a space for pan-Asian American voices, perspectives, and histories told through multimedia arts in Seattle. Our volunteer-run organization empowers and uplifts Asian American creatives and builds community connections through our annual festival and other year-round events. We aim to be a platform that broadens the understanding of our community’s stories through elevating independent films that reflect the diversity and richness of Asian Americana and Asian diasporas.

View Event

Celebrate the flavors of African-American, African, and Caribbean cuisine for the 3rd annual Northwest Black Restaurant Week. Black Restaurant Week is showcasing Black-owned restaurants and culinary businesses across the Northwest region. Dine at one of the participating restaurants offering a special Black Restaurant Week menu.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

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Asia Pacific Cultural Center
Tacoma, WA

We are excited to have our event back at the Tacoma Dome Exhibition Hall. Our host is the beautiful country of Samoa, showcasing its cultures and traditions. Look for a very exciting and high-energy show from the many performers of this amazing country.
To celebrate 25 years, this year promises to be a jammed pack day of fun, food, and entertainment for the whole family.
25 years marks a celebration of a family event that started in 1998 with Vietnam as the featured and host country. The year was attended by over a thousand people, with a few vendors and very entertaining cultural performances and demonstrations from all the countries that participated.
The New Year Celebration was thought of as a way for APCC to showcase the many countries and cultures that we represent. It also served as a vehicle to connect further with our surrounding community in Pierce and neighboring counties.
Through the years our New Year Celebration has become a much-anticipated community event with attendances of over 10,000 people and over 100 vendors along with many food booths, martial arts, and hands-on demonstrations.
Mark and save the date and be part of this historical day for APCC and our community.

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Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
PDX Jazz
Portland, OR

The Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is a two-week multi-venue celebration of jazz, ‘live’ concerts and education events, presented each February in Portland, Oregon. Nationally and regionally supported as a cultural tourism initiative in celebration of Black History Month, the Biamp Portland Jazz Festival is dedicated to evolving America’s indigenous art form, featuring recognized jazz masters and rising jazz stars, alongside local jazz heroes.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event
Native Youth Olympic (NYO) Games
Anchorage, AK

Our Alaska Native ancestors developed traditional contests to develop abilities crucial to everyday life. Competition with one another honed the abilities needed to successfully hunt and fish for daily survival in the traditional way of life. The creators of the NYO Games wanted to demonstrate these skills and preserve the traditional contests and culture of their forefathers. This vision has been realized and is now witnessed by people worldwide thanks to the involvement of many dedicated student athletes, coaches, volunteers, and the support of generous corporate sponsors and individual donors.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event

Elizabeth Leach Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition by Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos) which features recent paintings, sculpture, and installation. Titled looking for the land///found the weather, the exhibition is on view through February 25, 2023 with a First Thursday reception on January 5, 2023 and February 2, 2023.

Sara Siestreem is a multidisciplinary artist who combines painting, photography, printmaking, weaving, and large-scale installation. Siestreem’s work includes social practice relating to institutional reform, community engagement and curatorial and educational practices surrounding Indigenous fine art.

View Event

FIUTS CulturalFest celebrates the diversity and talent of the international community on our campus and in our region. This annual FIUTS community event welcomes thousands of globally-minded visitors of all ages and backgrounds to the University of Washington for cultural exploration and learning.

The CulturalFest Performance Showcase features performance art (music, dance, and others) from all over the world. These performers will take the Benaroya Hall stage representing the diverse student community here in the Pacific Northwest.

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Event
Organization
Location
Seattle Asian American Film Festival (SAAFF)
Seattle, WA

SAAFF is the only film festival to provide a space for pan-Asian American voices, perspectives, and histories told through multimedia arts in Seattle. Our volunteer-run organization empowers and uplifts Asian American creatives and builds community connections through our annual festival and other year-round events. We aim to be a platform that broadens the understanding of our community’s stories through elevating independent films that reflect the diversity and richness of Asian Americana and Asian diasporas.

View Event

Celebrate the flavors of African-American, African, and Caribbean cuisine for the 3rd annual Northwest Black Restaurant Week. Black Restaurant Week is showcasing Black-owned restaurants and culinary businesses across the Northwest region. Dine at one of the participating restaurants offering a special Black Restaurant Week menu.

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International Community Health Services (ICHS)
Shoreline, WA

The Lunar New Year 5k is back in person!

****Registration is NOW OPEN! Early bird prices ends January 27th.****

Stay safe, stay active! Celebrate 2023 Lunar New Year with a 5k run with our community! All runners and walkers of any age are welcome! As one of ICHS Foundation’s annual fundraising events, every dollar from registrations will fund free and low-cost health care services for patients in our community. All participants will get event swag, and a FREE event T-shirt (guaranteed when you register before Feb 10th).

About the Event

Registration will be at Shoreline City Hall. The Lunar New Year program will begin at Aurora Rents across the street to kick off the event. The 5k will be chip-timed on an out and back, mostly flat greenbelt Interurban trail.

Or, join us virtually wherever you are on Sunday, February 26! Share your photos and time online with us.

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Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

An immersive, site-responsive installation by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson, They Come From Fire will transform the exterior windows on the facade of the museum’s main building as well as its two-story interior Schnitzer Sculpture Court. This dynamic work will celebrate Portland’s Indigenous history, presence and vitality through the use of suspended glass panels, text, and photographic imagery created with Indigenous, BIPOC, LGBTQ+ artists, and other community members on and around the empty monument pedestals in the Park blocks in front of the museum. Coinciding with a survey of Dakota modernist Oscar Howe, the installation will serve as a bridge between the museum’s contemporary and Native American art collections.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Community, empowerment, and visibility are at the heart of the ongoing performance work To Name An Other, by multimedia artist Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972), who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and of Cherokee descent. The fifty pairs of matching tunics and drums in this large-scale installation are emblazoned with phrases that challenge the limiting ways we identify and interface with expectations surrounding race and gender. A video of past performances is also included in the gallery.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

View Event
Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event
Native Youth Olympic (NYO) Games
Anchorage, AK

Our Alaska Native ancestors developed traditional contests to develop abilities crucial to everyday life. Competition with one another honed the abilities needed to successfully hunt and fish for daily survival in the traditional way of life. The creators of the NYO Games wanted to demonstrate these skills and preserve the traditional contests and culture of their forefathers. This vision has been realized and is now witnessed by people worldwide thanks to the involvement of many dedicated student athletes, coaches, volunteers, and the support of generous corporate sponsors and individual donors.

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Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Seattle Asian American Film Festival (SAAFF)
Seattle, WA

SAAFF is the only film festival to provide a space for pan-Asian American voices, perspectives, and histories told through multimedia arts in Seattle. Our volunteer-run organization empowers and uplifts Asian American creatives and builds community connections through our annual festival and other year-round events. We aim to be a platform that broadens the understanding of our community’s stories through elevating independent films that reflect the diversity and richness of Asian Americana and Asian diasporas.

View Event

Celebrate the flavors of African-American, African, and Caribbean cuisine for the 3rd annual Northwest Black Restaurant Week. Black Restaurant Week is showcasing Black-owned restaurants and culinary businesses across the Northwest region. Dine at one of the participating restaurants offering a special Black Restaurant Week menu.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A new, original High Desert Museum exhibit celebrates this thriving culture.

In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo running from November 19, 2022 – June 25, 2023. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay Area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, this exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the show stopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year.

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Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The exhibit features a wide range of stories including the Quinault Nation fighting climate change, water protectors resisting fossil fuel development, Duwamish River stewardship, rising seas threatening Pacific Islands and other coastal communities, Native Hawaiians opposing military installations via traditional ceremony, and local community groups fighting disproportionate airplane noise and pollution on Seattle’s Beacon Hill.

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Kimura Gallery
Anchorage, AK

Anchorage, AK – NACF LIFT Artist Brian Walker II (King Island and Deg Hit’an Athabascan)
Supernal Enlivened at the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Arc Gallery.
Feb 3rd – May 5th, 2023
For more info:
https://alaska.digication.com/kimura-gallery/arc-gallery

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA

Across multiple geographies and a range of aesthetic approaches—from figurative clay sculpture to audio recordings of the swamp—these artists engage mud as a material or subject that shapes personal and collective histories, memory, and imagination. Each artist brings a distinct perspective to the theme, conjuring dynamics embedded in the landscape that include colonial and racialized forms of dispossession, cultural reclamation, narratives of self-actualization, and ecological loss and adaptation.
Mud moves through the exhibition as a metaphor as well as a tangible material. Both water and earth, mud exists in an in-between state. A medium that dissolves binaries, mud invites a blurring of past and present, personal and political, bodies and landscape, feeling and knowing. In various ways, the artworks in Thick as Mud move across these porous boundaries, disrupting linear narratives and dominant hierarchies that shape which places and stories matter.
Across the artworks, mud becomes an agent of time and transformation and a medium of decomposition and creation. As such, Thick as Mud tracks the afterlives of violence against people and the environment while also evoking the potential for regeneration. The exhibition is an invitation to ask what lives in the mud and to reconnect with the possibilities that this material holds.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

This is the Future, by the film and new media artist Hito Steyerl, explores a vibrant, imagined garden through an immersive environment of video projection, sculpture, and architectural intervention. Steyerl is one of the foremost artists offering critical reflections on the complexities of the digital world, global capitalism, and the implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for society, which is explored in this exhibition.

View Event
High Desert Museum
Bend, OR

For many Native communities throughout the High Desert, what constitutes art spans beyond the walls of a gallery or a museum. Objects are alive, tied to purpose and intrinsic to thriving communities. Art is at once utilitarian and ceremonial, as well as part of the continuation of Native traditions.

Opening on January 28, 2023, Creations of Spirit will immerse High Desert Museum visitors in the Indigenous Plateau worldview, reflecting knowledge systems of tribes along the Columbia River and its tributaries.

Six Native artists commissioned for this new, original exhibition are creating artwork that will be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. A seventh artist is creating an interactive piece for the center of the gallery. Creations of Spirit will be a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of these living works of art. Videos, audio and large projections will immerse visitors in the landscapes and communities in which these objects are used, highlighting the theme of artwork as alive, full of stories and created for specific purposes and people. The original works will be supplemented with nine cultural items on loan from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Seattle, WA

The signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin Roosevelt and the resulting mass incarceration of Japanese American families living on the West Coast is among the single most traumatic events in the history of Asian America, but many history books present an incomplete view of the full story. The truth is that this event did not happen in a vacuum nor did the people who lived this event do so quietly.
The exhibit leads visitors through a historical narrative beginning with the experience of Japanese American incarcerees in the 1940s and the complicated feelings of shame, anger, fear, and varied faces of resistance from within the community. Through the following decades, the story illustrates the generational trauma and cultural aftershocks of incarceration, while highlighting the lingering sense of injustice and awakening to justice movements at home and abroad. Fast forward to 2001 and beyond, the exhibit draws parallels between the stigmatization of Japanese Americans and modern-day anti-Muslim, anti-Arab, anti-Indigenous, anti-Black, and anti-immigrant policies. Visitors leave with a final prompt to consider: In the pursuit of justice, how will you show solidarity for movements today and into the future?
Through art, first-person accounts, historical material, and artifacts, this exhibit connects Japanese American resistance movements during the WWII era to modern BIPOC justice movements and activism today.

View Event
Rainier Avenue Radio
Seattle, WA

Call to Conscience will celebrate the achievements and the achievers of the PNW while recognizing the Black excellence that shines today through a toured exhibit-featuring
installations and exhibits.

Broadcasting from the Columbia City Theater for the official ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the the Call to Conscious Black History Museum with special guest speakers.

Other ways to Watch/Listen:
https://youtu.be/wDotWLiS1EA
https://twitch.tv/rainieravenueradio
https://twitter.com/rainieraveradio

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

Specializing in intricate natural and oil-dyed wooden and paper mosaics, artist Naoko Morisawa invites viewers to experience Happy Room — Mosaic Collage, a collection of over 50 small, mid, and large-scale works that evoke a sense of joy and draw from the Hygge lifestyle. The installation is divided into four rooms, Shoes/Closet, Kitchen/Living Room, Theater Japonism/Living Room, and Heart Room.

Each piece and room transforms everyday objects like a dependable pair of shoes or a pastry from a café into ornate, dynamic mosaics that invite viewers to find beauty in the details. Happy Room — Mosaic Collage features pieces from various bodies of work from the past 15 years including pieces from My Collection Shoes, Mosaic Café, Japanese Opera – Noh Mask, and newer abstract works.

View Event
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, WA

A showcase of transgender and sacred gender indigenous artists working in digital media, transmedia, film, 360 video, glitch art, contemporary interpretations of traditional forms, and future mediums. digital indigiqueer: a showcase of trans transmedia includes 11 individual pieces exploring the diversity of contemporary indigenous creativity and touching their futures and pasts. Work from Raven TwoFeathers, Ty Defoe, Raven Kameʻenui-Becker, Communidad Catrileo+Carrion, Elijah Forbes, and organizer Hexe Fey.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA

We are excited to celebrate our 4 year Anniversary Pachanga Saturday February 4th! Join us for free activities, comida, prizes and the opening of our February Art Exhibition.
This is our way of saying gracias to our beautiful community for their amazing support these past 4 years. Nepantla is a Nahuatl (Aztec language) term which describes being in the middle or the space in the middle. The term was popularized by Chicana writer/scholar Gloria Anzaldua. Most often the term references endangered communities, cultures or gender who due to colonialism/marginalization or historical trauma, that engage in resistance strategies of survival. Nepantla becomes the alternative space in which to live, heal, function and create.
So what does Nepantla mean to you? We can’t wait to see your art! Email submissions to nepantlaculturalarts@gmail.com

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of bead art, the ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The six artists featured in the exhibition call their paintings in beads ndwangos, which translates as “cloth” or “rag.” The black fabric on which the Ubuhle women work is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts which many of them grew up wearing. By stretching this textile like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads.

Using skills handed down through generations and working in their own unique style “directly from the soul,” according to artist Ntombephi Ntobela, the women create abstract as well as figurative subjects for their ndwangos.

View Event

Body Language: Reawakening Cultural Tattooing of the Northwest takes a closer look at the rich history and artistry of Indigenous tattooing of the Northwest coast. Photographs, cultural belongings, and contemporary art reveal how these previously disrupted and banned traditions have endured through the efforts of the Indigenous artists featured in this exhibition. Experience their stories and celebrate the resilience of Indigenous tattoo practitioners and those who wear the visual language of their ancestors on their bodies. Must be a member or donor to attened.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Seattle Asian American Film Festival (SAAFF)
Seattle, WA

SAAFF is the only film festival to provide a space for pan-Asian American voices, perspectives, and histories told through multimedia arts in Seattle. Our volunteer-run organization empowers and uplifts Asian American creatives and builds community connections through our annual festival and other year-round events. We aim to be a platform that broadens the understanding of our community’s stories through elevating independent films that reflect the diversity and richness of Asian Americana and Asian diasporas.

View Event

Celebrate the flavors of African-American, African, and Caribbean cuisine for the 3rd annual Northwest Black Restaurant Week. Black Restaurant Week is showcasing Black-owned restaurants and culinary businesses across the Northwest region. Dine at one of the participating restaurants offering a special Black Restaurant Week menu.

View Event
Portland Art Museum
Portland, OR

Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe introduces new generations to one of the twentieth century’s most innovative Native American painters. Howe (1915–1983) committed his artistic career to the preservation, relevance, and ongoing expression of his Yanktonai Dakota culture. He proved that art could be simultaneously modern and embedded in customary Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Sioux) culture and aesthetics—to him there was no contradiction.Howe challenged the art establishment’s preconceptions and definitions of Native American painting. In doing so, he catalyzed a movement among Native artists to express their individuality rather than conforming to an established style. This legacy of innovation and advocacy continues to inspire generations of Native artists to take pride in their heritage and resist stereotypes.

Dakota Modern traces more than forty years of the artist’s career and development from early conventional work created while in high school in the 1930s through the emergence in the 1950s and 1960s of his innovative and abstract approach to painting.

View Event

For this show, the artists selected an episode at the intersection of Sámi and American history as the source of their inspiration, and they created a collaborative, immersive installation in response to it. In 1894 and 1898, Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the General Agent of Education in Alaska, recommended that the United States Government invite Sámi herders to Alaska for the purpose of teaching reindeer husbandry to Alaska Native Peoples. The herders and reindeer traveled to Alaska by way of Seattle. Upon the expiration of their contract in 1900, some participants remained and joined the Gold Rush, while others returned to Sápmi.

The work of Sámi artist Colbengtson and Swedish artist Folkebrant reflects on this narrative, exploring issues of migration, herd mentality, time, and forgotten past. For the Mygration exhibition, Colbengtson selected and printed archival photos of Sámi immigrants, which are paired with Folkebrant’s large-scale paintings of the eight seasons of the mountain world, illustrating the Sámi concept of time and the life of the reindeer. The paintings are hung in a circle with the photographs at center, inviting the visitor to become immersed in a panoramic image. Additionally, the Museum has commissioned Folkebrant, a muralist, to create a piece related to the exhibition’s theme on the façade of a building on its campus.

View Event
Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
Spokane, WA

Across Mexico, mask-making is a vibrant and playful artform with roots in the celebration of religious holidays. Worn by dancers in rollicking performances known as danzas, the masks depict devils and holy men; celebrities from media and politics, and other known individuals who personify sinners and false idols.

In contextualizing masks and the expressive art forms through the life and work of contemporary Mexican mask artists, the exhibition dispels the common notion that masks and danzas are “archaic” Indigenous customs that are disappearing in the face of encroaching modernity. Instead, they are presented as expressions of contemporary living culture in which symbols and scripts from pop culture and religious narratives are combined to communicate about spiritual matters, political issues, and community life.

View Event

Showcasing abstract art featuring the works of Northwest artists: Vincent Keele, Shantell Jackson,Lo Mar Metoyer, and Yeggy Michael.

View Event

Black cowboys have long been an integral part of the American West. Thousands of Black cowboys, for instance, rode in the Western cattle drives of the 1860s. Their stories are largely untold in popular narratives, but modern-day Black rodeos keep their traditions alive. A ne