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Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Somos Seattle
Seattle, WA
WE ARE BACK!
—- 4th Seattle Latinx Pride Festival —-
Everyone is invited free event!
Let’s celebrate our LGBTQ and Latino/a/x identities.
ENTERTAINMENT, DANCING, FOOD, COMMUNITY RESOURCES/VENDORS & MUCH MORE!
Share &Invite ALL your friends!
—————————
Evento GRATIS!
Acompañanos en el cuarto festival del Orgullo LGBTQ Latino!
Sábado 16 de Julio 5-10 pm.
Ven celebrar el orgullo de la comunidad Gay, Lesbiana, Bi, Trans Latina.
ENTRETENIMIENTO, BAILE, COMIDA, BEBIDAS, RECURSOS COMUNITARIOS Y MUCHO MAS!
Pasa la voz e invita a más personas.
View Event
Red Eagle Soaring
Seattle, WA
Taproot Theatre Company
Seattle, WA

The formula for a secret weapon has been stolen, and that isn’t the only mystery in the Amory house! When Sir Claude discovers the theft, he locks his family in the library. Moments later there’s a dead body, a room full of suspects, and a Belgian sleuth at the door. Witness the famous Hercule Poirot untangle a jumble of deceptions to discover whodunit.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Seattle Japanese Garden
Seattle, WA

Practiced in Japan for centuries, the art of tea ceremony –also called Chado, or The Way of Tea– is imbued with harmony, respect, purity, and tranquility.

Our Shoseian Tea house offers an unparalleled opportunity to experience tea ceremony in a traditional roji garden setting. Omotosenke-ryu will be your host for this 40-minute “Introduction to Chanoyu” experience.

Chanoyu, which attained greatness under Sen no Rikyu, it a tradition that has been handed down for over 400 years. Omotesenke-ryu is a Seattle-based group that practices this long lineage, and their presentations at Seattle Japanese Garden are “a communication of the minds of host and guests through the enjoyment of delicious tea together”. Learn more about Omotosenke-ryu by following then on Facebook.

Visitors will be seated on tatami mats (with option to take a seat on a stool just outside the tea room and still participate).

Please avoid jeans, bare feet, rings, and personal fragrances.

Tea ceremonies will be offered beginning at 1 P.M., 2 P.M., and 3 P.M. Reservations required. Tea ceremony tickets can be purchased by calling (206) 684-4725. 

View Event
One Vibe Africa
Seattle, WA

One Vibe is proud to unveil the eighth annual Madaraka Festival on August 13th and 14th at Pier 62 at Waterfront Park in Seattle

About this event

One Vibe is proud to unveil the eighth annual Madaraka Festival on Saturday, August 13th and Sunday August 14th. Madaraka Festival brings Africa’s finest musicians and creatives together with world renowned artists and innovators for a celebration of music and civic purpose. The festival will be held from 2:00 pm at Pier 62 at Waterfront Park in Seattle, Washington where we will have live musical performances, African food, and art! The festival will also be streamed for a global audience on YouTube and Facebook. In these unprecedented times, it is vital that we stand in solidarity with one another and enjoy the creativity that has sustained us through challenging times. What better way to live in the post-pandemic period than being the Global Village that we are!

 

Since 2014, Madaraka Festival has attracted more than 12,000 patrons & reached over 15 million people digitally while empowering diversity and inclusion in the Seattle community. Madaraka Festival has uniquely deepened the relationship between African, African American communities, and fostered partnerships with other international communities while shifting narrative and honoring cultural dynamics. In 2019, this international cultural extravaganza was a culmination of an entire week of activities in Kisumu, Kenya where One Vibe Africa originated. In 2020, Madaraka happened virtually and raised seed capital for 106 women who run small scale businesses in three Kenyan slums. Madaraka provided an opportunity for nearly 100 African-Americans to participate in cross-cultural exchange programs. In 2021, Madaraka Festival was held at Bellevue Youth Theater’s outdoor amphitheater headlined by Grammy Award nominated reggae legend, Pato Banton as part of his world peace tour.

 

This year, Madaraka Festival will honor African and African American culture while elevating their voices and creating community cohesion. The founder of One Vibe Africa and Madaraka Festival Simon Javan Okelo, has curated a lineup that will be unveiled as we get closer to the date of the event. We are excited to come together in the spirit of unity to collaborate with Converge Media, Common Good Church, RVC Seattle, Langston Seattle, Wa Na Wari, N333D Creative, NW Film Forum, NW Folklife Festival, and other organizations, sponsors, and partners to bring to you the 2022 Madaraka Festival. Additionally, Wednesday, May 25th during Africa Day will mark the beginning of the online campaign, which will culminate with the Madaraka Festival on August 13th and 14th.

For more information, visit www.madarakafestival.com

View Event
Taproot Theatre Company
Seattle, WA

The formula for a secret weapon has been stolen, and that isn’t the only mystery in the Amory house! When Sir Claude discovers the theft, he locks his family in the library. Moments later there’s a dead body, a room full of suspects, and a Belgian sleuth at the door. Witness the famous Hercule Poirot untangle a jumble of deceptions to discover whodunit.

View Event
Sankofa Film Society & Theatre
Seattle, WA
Before Oprah, before Arsenio, there was Mr. SOUL! Ellis Haizlip ensures the Revolution will be televised with “SOUL!,” America’s first “Black Tonight Show.”
From 1968 to 1973, the public-television variety show SOUL!, guided by enigmatic producer and host Ellis Haizlip, offered an unfiltered, uncompromising celebration of Black literature, poetry, music, and politics–voices that had few other options for national exposure, and, as a result, found the program an improbable place to call home. The series was among the first to provide expanded images of African Americans on television, shifting the gaze from inner-city poverty and violence to the vibrancy of the Black Arts Movement. With participants’ recollections and illuminating archival clips, Mr. SOUL captures a critical moment in culture whose impact continues to resonate, and an unsung hero whose voice we need now more than ever, to restore the SOUL of a nation.
View Event
Seattle Asian American Film Festival (SAAFF)
Seattle, WA

The Seattle Asian American Film Festival, in partnership with Seattle Parks and Recreation and InterIM CDA, hosts a month of Chinatown-International District outdoor movies at Hing Hay Park in the summertime.

Join us for free and family-friendly outdoor programming every Saturday evening in August, featuring performances by local musical acts, face painting, art making, and popcorn for all. Once the sun goes down, the movie begins!

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Seattle Japanese Garden
Seattle, WA

Practiced in Japan for centuries, the art of tea ceremony –also called Chado, or The Way of Tea– is imbued with harmony, respect, purity, and tranquility.

Our Shoseian Tea house offers an unparalleled opportunity to experience tea ceremony in a traditional roji garden setting. Omotosenke-ryu will be your host for this 40-minute “Introduction to Chanoyu” experience.

Chanoyu, which attained greatness under Sen no Rikyu, it a tradition that has been handed down for over 400 years. Omotesenke-ryu is a Seattle-based group that practices this long lineage, and their presentations at Seattle Japanese Garden are “a communication of the minds of host and guests through the enjoyment of delicious tea together”. Learn more about Omotosenke-ryu by following then on Facebook.

Visitors will be seated on tatami mats (with option to take a seat on a stool just outside the tea room and still participate).

Please avoid jeans, bare feet, rings, and personal fragrances.

Tea ceremonies will be offered beginning at 1 P.M., 2 P.M., and 3 P.M. Reservations required. Tea ceremony tickets can be purchased by calling (206) 684-4725. 

View Event
One Vibe Africa
Seattle, WA

One Vibe is proud to unveil the eighth annual Madaraka Festival on August 13th and 14th at Pier 62 at Waterfront Park in Seattle

About this event

One Vibe is proud to unveil the eighth annual Madaraka Festival on Saturday, August 13th and Sunday August 14th. Madaraka Festival brings Africa’s finest musicians and creatives together with world renowned artists and innovators for a celebration of music and civic purpose. The festival will be held from 2:00 pm at Pier 62 at Waterfront Park in Seattle, Washington where we will have live musical performances, African food, and art! The festival will also be streamed for a global audience on YouTube and Facebook. In these unprecedented times, it is vital that we stand in solidarity with one another and enjoy the creativity that has sustained us through challenging times. What better way to live in the post-pandemic period than being the Global Village that we are!

 

Since 2014, Madaraka Festival has attracted more than 12,000 patrons & reached over 15 million people digitally while empowering diversity and inclusion in the Seattle community. Madaraka Festival has uniquely deepened the relationship between African, African American communities, and fostered partnerships with other international communities while shifting narrative and honoring cultural dynamics. In 2019, this international cultural extravaganza was a culmination of an entire week of activities in Kisumu, Kenya where One Vibe Africa originated. In 2020, Madaraka happened virtually and raised seed capital for 106 women who run small scale businesses in three Kenyan slums. Madaraka provided an opportunity for nearly 100 African-Americans to participate in cross-cultural exchange programs. In 2021, Madaraka Festival was held at Bellevue Youth Theater’s outdoor amphitheater headlined by Grammy Award nominated reggae legend, Pato Banton as part of his world peace tour.

 

This year, Madaraka Festival will honor African and African American culture while elevating their voices and creating community cohesion. The founder of One Vibe Africa and Madaraka Festival Simon Javan Okelo, has curated a lineup that will be unveiled as we get closer to the date of the event. We are excited to come together in the spirit of unity to collaborate with Converge Media, Common Good Church, RVC Seattle, Langston Seattle, Wa Na Wari, N333D Creative, NW Film Forum, NW Folklife Festival, and other organizations, sponsors, and partners to bring to you the 2022 Madaraka Festival. Additionally, Wednesday, May 25th during Africa Day will mark the beginning of the online campaign, which will culminate with the Madaraka Festival on August 13th and 14th.

For more information, visit www.madarakafestival.com

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Brothers United in Leadership Development (BUILD)
Seattle, WA

Join BUILD as we bring movies featuring Black leads and/or Black Stories back to the community. Our partner, Ark Lodge Cinemas, is helping us continue this initiative with One Night in Miami, directed by Regina King.

This event is completely FREE and open to the community. One (1) free small popcorn and a small drink will be provided with your RSVP. Space is limited, so RSVP early.

This movie is rated R. Community members must be 18+ for entry into the cinema.

Please only RSVP for the tickets you need.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Entre Hermanos
Seattle, WA
As seen in The Stranger and Seattle Met
You want the FUNK?! We got the FUNK!
What the Funk?! An All BIPOC Burlesque Fest is BACK at The Triple Door with another installment of their sold-out festival!
Conceived as a tribute to Funk music as a show idea in early 2018 by founder and co producer, Mx. Pucks A’Plenty, WTFFest is now a three night celebration of art and culture.
Puckduction and the Stay Up Late Show bring you three nights of funk, the whole funk, and nothing, but the funk.
Tickets $30-$50
Featuring Headliners:
Jessabelle Thunder (LA) | Isaiah Esquire ( Portland) | Shimmy LaRoux (Chicago) | Crocodile Lightning (Chicago) | Tito Bonito (LA)
PNW Feature Performers:
Carmen Caliente (Sea) | Dulce D’jour (Oly) | TAQUEET$! (Sea) | RiRi SynCyr (Portland)
Emcee Opening Night
Goddess Briq House
with Live Band Off Da Hook – Old Skool Kool
Night 2 Emcee
Sparkle Plenty (Canada)
Night 3 Emcee
Rebecca MmmDavis
And the step down performance of Grand Master Funk 2021, P No Noire
Three nights
Three different casts
And nothing, but the FUNK!
Seating and dinner service begins at 6pm {17+}
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
As seen in The Stranger and Seattle Met
You want the FUNK?! We got the FUNK!
What the Funk?! An All BIPOC Burlesque Fest is BACK at The Triple Door with another installment of their sold-out festival!
Conceived as a tribute to Funk music as a show idea in early 2018 by founder and co producer, Mx. Pucks A’Plenty, WTFFest is now a three night celebration of art and culture.
Puckduction and the Stay Up Late Show bring you three nights of funk, the whole funk, and nothing, but the funk.
Tickets $30-$50
Featuring Headliners:
Jessabelle Thunder (LA) | Isaiah Esquire ( Portland) | Shimmy LaRoux (Chicago) | Crocodile Lightning (Chicago) | Tito Bonito (LA)
PNW Feature Performers:
Carmen Caliente (Sea) | Dulce D’jour (Oly) | TAQUEET$! (Sea) | RiRi SynCyr (Portland)
Emcee Opening Night
Goddess Briq House
with Live Band Off Da Hook – Old Skool Kool
Night 2 Emcee
Sparkle Plenty (Canada)
Night 3 Emcee
Rebecca MmmDavis
And the step down performance of Grand Master Funk 2021, P No Noire
Three nights
Three different casts
And nothing, but the FUNK!
Seating and dinner service begins at 6pm {17+}
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Friends of Little Saigon
Seattle, WA

Join us in Little Saigon for our 11th annual neighborhood block party celebrating Vietnamese food, culture, and community!

View Event
Movimiento Afrolatino Seattle (MÁS)
Seattle, WA

 La Cumbia es uno de los ritmos folclóricos tradicionales modernos más populares  de América Latina. Es un género musical muy pegadizo que tiene su origen  gracias a las comunidades descendientes africanas en Colombia donde  comenzó como una resistencia, expresión y cortejo a través de la danza.

Lxs niñxs de 7 a 12 años aprenderán los pasos básicos de la cumbia mientras forman una coreografía grupal, algunxs podrán participar con instrumentos de percusión.  Además de participar en la danza y el ritmo cumbiero, lxs niñxs también se beneficiarán física y socialmente al desarrollar habilidades de expresión, autoestima, identidad, ritmo, coordinación y flexibilidad.

¡Con muchas ganas y a disfrutar de este contagioso y alegre ritmo!
La danza es un puente y un lenguaje para conectar con la diversidad.

 

Talleristas: Grupo de danza Rimawaynina Cumbé

Periodo: 5 sesiones del 20 de Agosto al 17 de septiembre

Horario: 1:00 a 2:00pm

Edades: A partir de los 7 a 12 años.

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As seen in The Stranger and Seattle Met
You want the FUNK?! We got the FUNK!
What the Funk?! An All BIPOC Burlesque Fest is BACK at The Triple Door with another installment of their sold-out festival!
Conceived as a tribute to Funk music as a show idea in early 2018 by founder and co producer, Mx. Pucks A’Plenty, WTFFest is now a three night celebration of art and culture.
Puckduction and the Stay Up Late Show bring you three nights of funk, the whole funk, and nothing, but the funk.
Tickets $30-$50
Featuring Headliners:
Jessabelle Thunder (LA) | Isaiah Esquire ( Portland) | Shimmy LaRoux (Chicago) | Crocodile Lightning (Chicago) | Tito Bonito (LA)
PNW Feature Performers:
Carmen Caliente (Sea) | Dulce D’jour (Oly) | TAQUEET$! (Sea) | RiRi SynCyr (Portland)
Emcee Opening Night
Goddess Briq House
with Live Band Off Da Hook – Old Skool Kool
Night 2 Emcee
Sparkle Plenty (Canada)
Night 3 Emcee
Rebecca MmmDavis
And the step down performance of Grand Master Funk 2021, P No Noire
Three nights
Three different casts
And nothing, but the FUNK!
Seating and dinner service begins at 6pm {17+}
View Event
Seattle Asian American Film Festival (SAAFF)
Seattle, WA

The Seattle Asian American Film Festival, in partnership with Seattle Parks and Recreation and InterIM CDA, hosts a month of Chinatown-International District outdoor movies at Hing Hay Park in the summertime.

Join us for free and family-friendly outdoor programming every Saturday evening in August, featuring performances by local musical acts, face painting, art making, and popcorn for all. Once the sun goes down, the movie begins!

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Sunday, August 21, 2022
206 Zulu Presents A Conversation & Workshop With
GRANDWIZZARD THEODORE
(Hip Hop Pioneer and Inventor of the Scratch)
Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave, Seattle, WA
Limited Availability. Tickets release July 25, 2022.
2pm | $15 | All-Ages
ABOUT GRANDWIZZARD THEODORE
One of early hip-hop’s most skilled DJs, Grand Wizard Theodore is universally acknowledged as the inventor of the scratch. Grandmaster Flash pioneered many early turntable techniques, including “cutting” records (manually cueing up duplicate copies of the same record in order to play the same passage, cutting back and forth between them), but it was the young Theodore who built on Flash’s work by taking the scratching sound made when the records were cued, and adding a rhythm that made the turntable into a percussion instrument the DJ could “play.” Theodore is also credited with pioneering the needle drop, a technique where, instead of cueing up the record silently, the DJ simply drops the needle onto the exact start of the passage to be played. Grand Wizard Theodore was born Theodore Livingstone and grew up in the Bronx. His older brothers Gene and Claudio were an early hip-hop duo called the L-Brothers, and they frequently collaborated with Grandmaster Flash. Flash discovered that young Theodore (not even a teenager yet) had a natural affinity for the turntables, and when Flash spun records in public parks, he would sometimes set up a milk crate to let Theodore DJ. According to legend, Theodore invented scratching largely by accident, circa 1977 (when he was about 13 or 14); holed up in his bedroom playing records, Theodore had to pause to hear his mother scold him about the volume, and happened to move one of the records back and forth. He liked the sound and played with it often, developing the technique until it was ready for public performance. Flash picked up on it quickly, and Theodore in turn began copying Flash’s acrobatic record-spinning tricks (using his elbows, feet, etc.). By the time the ’80s rolled around, Grand Wizard Theodore was one of the top DJs in New York. He hooked up with a crew that was most often billed as Grand Wizard Theodore and the Fantastic 5 MCs, which released the cult classic single “Can I Get a Soul Clap” in 1980 on the Tuff City label. The group never recorded a proper album, but they did appear in the 1983 old school hip-hop film Wild Style (which later became a cult classic); they recorded several songs on the soundtrack and appeared in an MC battle sequence with their chief rivals the Cold Crush Brothers. While Grand Wizard Theodore never received the same wide acclaim as Grandmaster Flash during his career, he was eventually rediscovered by hip-hop historians, which helped him land some international DJ gigs in the ’90s. He also appeared at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 1999 hip-hop conference, and teaches advanced classes in the art of DJing.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Nepantla Cultural Arts Gallery
Seattle, WA
Seattle Japanese Garden
Seattle, WA

Practiced in Japan for centuries, the art of tea ceremony –also called Chado, or The Way of Tea– is imbued with harmony, respect, purity, and tranquility.

Our Shoseian Tea house offers an unparalleled opportunity to experience tea ceremony in a traditional roji garden setting. Omotosenke-ryu will be your host for this 40-minute “Introduction to Chanoyu” experience.

Chanoyu, which attained greatness under Sen no Rikyu, it a tradition that has been handed down for over 400 years. Omotesenke-ryu is a Seattle-based group that practices this long lineage, and their presentations at Seattle Japanese Garden are “a communication of the minds of host and guests through the enjoyment of delicious tea together”. Learn more about Omotosenke-ryu by following then on Facebook.

Visitors will be seated on tatami mats (with option to take a seat on a stool just outside the tea room and still participate).

Please avoid jeans, bare feet, rings, and personal fragrances.

Tea ceremonies will be offered beginning at 1 P.M., 2 P.M., and 3 P.M. Reservations required. Tea ceremony tickets can be purchased by calling (206) 684-4725. 

View Event
Brothers United in Leadership Development (BUILD)
Seattle, WA

Come out and “Kick it” with us as we BUILD community by playing Kickball with friends, family, and community.

This event is open to all ages. No hidden agendas we are just trying to BUILD Community!

Volunteers are Needed – Sign up to volunteer at: https://forms.gle/oufqJF8yy5j5rAd77

View Event
Movimiento Afrolatino Seattle (MÁS)
Seattle, WA

 La Cumbia es uno de los ritmos folclóricos tradicionales modernos más populares  de América Latina. Es un género musical muy pegadizo que tiene su origen  gracias a las comunidades descendientes africanas en Colombia donde  comenzó como una resistencia, expresión y cortejo a través de la danza.

Lxs niñxs de 7 a 12 años aprenderán los pasos básicos de la cumbia mientras forman una coreografía grupal, algunxs podrán participar con instrumentos de percusión.  Además de participar en la danza y el ritmo cumbiero, lxs niñxs también se beneficiarán física y socialmente al desarrollar habilidades de expresión, autoestima, identidad, ritmo, coordinación y flexibilidad.

¡Con muchas ganas y a disfrutar de este contagioso y alegre ritmo!
La danza es un puente y un lenguaje para conectar con la diversidad.

 

Talleristas: Grupo de danza Rimawaynina Cumbé

Periodo: 5 sesiones del 20 de Agosto al 17 de septiembre

Horario: 1:00 a 2:00pm

Edades: A partir de los 7 a 12 años.

View Event
Seattle Asian American Film Festival (SAAFF)
Seattle, WA

The Seattle Asian American Film Festival, in partnership with Seattle Parks and Recreation and InterIM CDA, hosts a month of Chinatown-International District outdoor movies at Hing Hay Park in the summertime.

Join us for free and family-friendly outdoor programming every Saturday evening in August, featuring performances by local musical acts, face painting, art making, and popcorn for all. Once the sun goes down, the movie begins!

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Black & Tan Hall
Seattle, WA

Join us this summer for Back Alley Block Parties featuring local chefs and a variety of performers, including live musicians, DJ’s, and dancers! Join us behind the alley behind Black & Tan Hall, 5608 Rainier Ave S, between Findlay and Orcas

View Event
Langston
Seattle, WA

Langston Seattle and Three Dollar Bill Cinema partner together to present Prince’s classic movie musical Purple Rain. Free and open for the public, pack a picnic and join us for drag performances, trivia games, and of course, singing!

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Movimiento Afrolatino Seattle (MÁS)
Seattle, WA

 La Cumbia es uno de los ritmos folclóricos tradicionales modernos más populares  de América Latina. Es un género musical muy pegadizo que tiene su origen  gracias a las comunidades descendientes africanas en Colombia donde  comenzó como una resistencia, expresión y cortejo a través de la danza.

Lxs niñxs de 7 a 12 años aprenderán los pasos básicos de la cumbia mientras forman una coreografía grupal, algunxs podrán participar con instrumentos de percusión.  Además de participar en la danza y el ritmo cumbiero, lxs niñxs también se beneficiarán física y socialmente al desarrollar habilidades de expresión, autoestima, identidad, ritmo, coordinación y flexibilidad.

¡Con muchas ganas y a disfrutar de este contagioso y alegre ritmo!
La danza es un puente y un lenguaje para conectar con la diversidad.

 

Talleristas: Grupo de danza Rimawaynina Cumbé

Periodo: 5 sesiones del 20 de Agosto al 17 de septiembre

Horario: 1:00 a 2:00pm

Edades: A partir de los 7 a 12 años.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Movimiento Afrolatino Seattle (MÁS)
Seattle, WA

 La Cumbia es uno de los ritmos folclóricos tradicionales modernos más populares  de América Latina. Es un género musical muy pegadizo que tiene su origen  gracias a las comunidades descendientes africanas en Colombia donde  comenzó como una resistencia, expresión y cortejo a través de la danza.

Lxs niñxs de 7 a 12 años aprenderán los pasos básicos de la cumbia mientras forman una coreografía grupal, algunxs podrán participar con instrumentos de percusión.  Además de participar en la danza y el ritmo cumbiero, lxs niñxs también se beneficiarán física y socialmente al desarrollar habilidades de expresión, autoestima, identidad, ritmo, coordinación y flexibilidad.

¡Con muchas ganas y a disfrutar de este contagioso y alegre ritmo!
La danza es un puente y un lenguaje para conectar con la diversidad.

 

Talleristas: Grupo de danza Rimawaynina Cumbé

Periodo: 5 sesiones del 20 de Agosto al 17 de septiembre

Horario: 1:00 a 2:00pm

Edades: A partir de los 7 a 12 años.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Seattle Live Aloha Hawaiian Cultural Festival
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Young Women Empowered (Y-WE)
Seattle, WA

With our hands on the land at Marra Farm, we will connect with the Earth in reciprocal relationship, gain practical gardening skills, and grow fresh, culturally-relevant produce. We will also learn how to disrupt racism and injustice in the food system dominant in the U.S. through investing in food sovereignty locally and gaining skills for interdependence, such as woodworking, plant medicine, and ecosystem restoration. We will also plan a Fall community celebration.

Every Saturday 9AM-12PM from 9/17-10/29

Where: Marra Farm (Marra-Desimone Park, 9026 4th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98108)

Facilitated by Neli Jasuja and Tayah Carlisle

Other outdoor programs throughout the year:

  • Nature Connections
  • June Container Garden Giveaway Celebration
  • Y-WE Grow Spring Cohort
  • Summer Urban Innovators (South Park and Duwamish Valley youth) – in collaboration with Urban Fresh Food Collective, Resistencia Coffee, and Cultivate South Park
  • South Asian Youth Leadership in Food Justice
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Young Women Empowered (Y-WE)
Seattle, WA

A regenerative two-day workshop to get into relationship with community & ourselves as we dive deep into cultivating healthy boundaries!

About this event

Y-WE Presents “Liberating our Boundaries: A two-day workshop for adults.” When we are clear about our boundaries, it lays the foundation for mutual trust, care and accountability in our relationships. What histories are at the root of our boundary setting-styles & how do they inform our relationship to self & others? How do they serve as barriers or supporters of our own flourishing? After all, we need sustainable relationships to foster thriving communities & social movements. Join us September 17-18, 2022 for a re/generative two-day workshop at our new office to be in community & reconnect with ourselves as we dive deep into cultivating healthy boundaries. This weekend will incorporate juicy discussion, creativity, movement-based practices and more.

This is a fee-based program. Cost of participation will go towards covering programming like this for Y-WE youth.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

View Event
Movimiento Afrolatino Seattle (MÁS)
Seattle, WA

 La Cumbia es uno de los ritmos folclóricos tradicionales modernos más populares  de América Latina. Es un género musical muy pegadizo que tiene su origen  gracias a las comunidades descendientes africanas en Colombia donde  comenzó como una resistencia, expresión y cortejo a través de la danza.

Lxs niñxs de 7 a 12 años aprenderán los pasos básicos de la cumbia mientras forman una coreografía grupal, algunxs podrán participar con instrumentos de percusión.  Además de participar en la danza y el ritmo cumbiero, lxs niñxs también se beneficiarán física y socialmente al desarrollar habilidades de expresión, autoestima, identidad, ritmo, coordinación y flexibilidad.

¡Con muchas ganas y a disfrutar de este contagioso y alegre ritmo!
La danza es un puente y un lenguaje para conectar con la diversidad.

 

Talleristas: Grupo de danza Rimawaynina Cumbé

Periodo: 5 sesiones del 20 de Agosto al 17 de septiembre

Horario: 1:00 a 2:00pm

Edades: A partir de los 7 a 12 años.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Young Women Empowered (Y-WE)
Seattle, WA

A regenerative two-day workshop to get into relationship with community & ourselves as we dive deep into cultivating healthy boundaries!

About this event

Y-WE Presents “Liberating our Boundaries: A two-day workshop for adults.” When we are clear about our boundaries, it lays the foundation for mutual trust, care and accountability in our relationships. What histories are at the root of our boundary setting-styles & how do they inform our relationship to self & others? How do they serve as barriers or supporters of our own flourishing? After all, we need sustainable relationships to foster thriving communities & social movements. Join us September 17-18, 2022 for a re/generative two-day workshop at our new office to be in community & reconnect with ourselves as we dive deep into cultivating healthy boundaries. This weekend will incorporate juicy discussion, creativity, movement-based practices and more.

This is a fee-based program. Cost of participation will go towards covering programming like this for Y-WE youth.

View Event
Frye Art Museum
Seattle, WA

Featuring some fifty-five paintings, works on paper, and collages, Romare Bearden: Abstraction is the first exhibition to fully explore the artist’s significant body of abstract work created between 1952 and 1964. Exhibited with success at the time of their execution, these artworks are little known today. Nonetheless, they directly inform the figurative collages for which Bearden is now best known and cement the artist’s influential place within the New York avant-garde of the 1950s–60s.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century and had a prolific career that spanned nearly fifty years. He was also a writer, social worker, and an active arts organizer: he was the first art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, a prominent African American advocacy group, and was involved in the founding of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in 1914 his family relocated to Harlem as part of the “Great Migration,” during which many southern-born African Americans fled north to escape the Jim Crow South. Bearden studied art throughout the 1930s and by 1945 his work was being exhibited in Paris alongside leading contemporary artists of the American vanguard. Bearden began fully engaging with non-representational subjects in the 1950s, and his skills in the medium of oil paint reached its apex when he began applying thinned oil paint and turpentine to unsized canvas, a method now commonly referred to as “stain” painting. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Bearden continually reimagined his approach to artmaking, developing additional techniques that incorporated the mediums of casein and collage.

This exhibition provides a chronology and context for the period during which Bearden produced his abstractions and bookends this decade of work with the artist’s widely celebrated figurative paintings and collages, such as Melon Season (1967) and La Primavera (1967). Central to this presentation are Bearden’s stain paintings and casein paintings, including Eastern Gate (ca. 1961) and River Mist (ca. 1962), which reveal masterfully distinctive experimentations with color and form. Altogether, Romare Bearden: Abstraction tells the story of a historically neglected but extraordinary and critically important aspect of the artist’s oeuvre.

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Event
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Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Young Women Empowered (Y-WE)
Seattle, WA

With our hands on the land at Marra Farm, we will connect with the Earth in reciprocal relationship, gain practical gardening skills, and grow fresh, culturally-relevant produce. We will also learn how to disrupt racism and injustice in the food system dominant in the U.S. through investing in food sovereignty locally and gaining skills for interdependence, such as woodworking, plant medicine, and ecosystem restoration. We will also plan a Fall community celebration.

Every Saturday 9AM-12PM from 9/17-10/29

Where: Marra Farm (Marra-Desimone Park, 9026 4th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98108)

Facilitated by Neli Jasuja and Tayah Carlisle

Other outdoor programs throughout the year:

  • Nature Connections
  • June Container Garden Giveaway Celebration
  • Y-WE Grow Spring Cohort
  • Summer Urban Innovators (South Park and Duwamish Valley youth) – in collaboration with Urban Fresh Food Collective, Resistencia Coffee, and Cultivate South Park
  • South Asian Youth Leadership in Food Justice
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Young Women Empowered (Y-WE)
Seattle, WA

With our hands on the land at Marra Farm, we will connect with the Earth in reciprocal relationship, gain practical gardening skills, and grow fresh, culturally-relevant produce. We will also learn how to disrupt racism and injustice in the food system dominant in the U.S. through investing in food sovereignty locally and gaining skills for interdependence, such as woodworking, plant medicine, and ecosystem restoration. We will also plan a Fall community celebration.

Every Saturday 9AM-12PM from 9/17-10/29

Where: Marra Farm (Marra-Desimone Park, 9026 4th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98108)

Facilitated by Neli Jasuja and Tayah Carlisle

Other outdoor programs throughout the year:

  • Nature Connections
  • June Container Garden Giveaway Celebration
  • Y-WE Grow Spring Cohort
  • Summer Urban Innovators (South Park and Duwamish Valley youth) – in collaboration with Urban Fresh Food Collective, Resistencia Coffee, and Cultivate South Park
  • South Asian Youth Leadership in Food Justice
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Young Women Empowered (Y-WE)
Seattle, WA

With our hands on the land at Marra Farm, we will connect with the Earth in reciprocal relationship, gain practical gardening skills, and grow fresh, culturally-relevant produce. We will also learn how to disrupt racism and injustice in the food system dominant in the U.S. through investing in food sovereignty locally and gaining skills for interdependence, such as woodworking, plant medicine, and ecosystem restoration. We will also plan a Fall community celebration.

Every Saturday 9AM-12PM from 9/17-10/29

Where: Marra Farm (Marra-Desimone Park, 9026 4th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98108)

Facilitated by Neli Jasuja and Tayah Carlisle

Other outdoor programs throughout the year:

  • Nature Connections
  • June Container Garden Giveaway Celebration
  • Y-WE Grow Spring Cohort
  • Summer Urban Innovators (South Park and Duwamish Valley youth) – in collaboration with Urban Fresh Food Collective, Resistencia Coffee, and Cultivate South Park
  • South Asian Youth Leadership in Food Justice
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Event
Organization
Location
Young Women Empowered (Y-WE)
Seattle, WA

With our hands on the land at Marra Farm, we will connect with the Earth in reciprocal relationship, gain practical gardening skills, and grow fresh, culturally-relevant produce. We will also learn how to disrupt racism and injustice in the food system dominant in the U.S. through investing in food sovereignty locally and gaining skills for interdependence, such as woodworking, plant medicine, and ecosystem restoration. We will also plan a Fall community celebration.

Every Saturday 9AM-12PM from 9/17-10/29

Where: Marra Farm (Marra-Desimone Park, 9026 4th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98108)

Facilitated by Neli Jasuja and Tayah Carlisle

Other outdoor programs throughout the year:

  • Nature Connections
  • June Container Garden Giveaway Celebration
  • Y-WE Grow Spring Cohort
  • Summer Urban Innovators (South Park and Duwamish Valley youth) – in collaboration with Urban Fresh Food Collective, Resistencia Coffee, and Cultivate South Park
  • South Asian Youth Leadership in Food Justice
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Young Women Empowered (Y-WE)
Seattle, WA

With our hands on the land at Marra Farm, we will connect with the Earth in reciprocal relationship, gain practical gardening skills, and grow fresh, culturally-relevant produce. We will also learn how to disrupt racism and injustice in the food system dominant in the U.S. through investing in food sovereignty locally and gaining skills for interdependence, such as woodworking, plant medicine, and ecosystem restoration. We will also plan a Fall community celebration.

Every Saturday 9AM-12PM from 9/17-10/29

Where: Marra Farm (Marra-Desimone Park, 9026 4th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98108)

Facilitated by Neli Jasuja and Tayah Carlisle

Other outdoor programs throughout the year:

  • Nature Connections
  • June Container Garden Giveaway Celebration
  • Y-WE Grow Spring Cohort
  • Summer Urban Innovators (South Park and Duwamish Valley youth) – in collaboration with Urban Fresh Food Collective, Resistencia Coffee, and Cultivate South Park
  • South Asian Youth Leadership in Food Justice
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Young Women Empowered (Y-WE)
Seattle, WA

With our hands on the land at Marra Farm, we will connect with the Earth in reciprocal relationship, gain practical gardening skills, and grow fresh, culturally-relevant produce. We will also learn how to disrupt racism and injustice in the food system dominant in the U.S. through investing in food sovereignty locally and gaining skills for interdependence, such as woodworking, plant medicine, and ecosystem restoration. We will also plan a Fall community celebration.

Every Saturday 9AM-12PM from 9/17-10/29

Where: Marra Farm (Marra-Desimone Park, 9026 4th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98108)

Facilitated by Neli Jasuja and Tayah Carlisle

Other outdoor programs throughout the year:

  • Nature Connections
  • June Container Garden Giveaway Celebration
  • Y-WE Grow Spring Cohort
  • Summer Urban Innovators (South Park and Duwamish Valley youth) – in collaboration with Urban Fresh Food Collective, Resistencia Coffee, and Cultivate South Park
  • South Asian Youth Leadership in Food Justice
View Event

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

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In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Event
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Event
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Event
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

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In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
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Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location

Oscar Winner Ruth E. Carter’s costumes from more than a dozen films will be on display at MoPOP starting June 18 in an exhibition exploring her perspective on Afrofuturism: the application of knowledge intertwined with imagination, self-expression, and an entrepreneurial spirit.

View Event
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
In Chinese art, the past is often a source of inspiration and sometimes also a means for expressing resistance to status quos. Works by the contemporary artists in this exhibition reanimate China’s material, visual, and linguistic legacies with contemplations on the social costs of modernity and globalization, of migrating from one place and culture to another, and the challenge that humans represent to the natural world. This exhibition was developed in collaboration with University of Washington students.
View Event