How to use this calendar

Click a date on the calendar or search by location and event type.

Community Focus

Asia

Europe

Middle East & Africa

Americas

Pacific

Global/Multicultural

Event Categories
Date/Location

Events on or after

Events within these regions

Calendar

Attend festivals, performances, exhibits, workshops and more! Use simple filters to find specific types of events near you.

Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event

“Nature writing” is its own genre in the literary world, but increasingly writers and readers are pushing past the boundaries of what has traditionally constituted writing about the “environment.” A growing number of diverse voices and perspectives are exploring what it means to encounter and to be in relationship with the living world as a complex and multifaceted web of life that has agency and animism—of which the human story is but one part.

This course seeks to expand our understanding of nature writing as both a genre and a practice. We will welcome several guest writers—Rebecca Giggs, Charles Foster, Lucy Jones, Lia Purpura, and Jamie Figueroa—to help us push the bounds of nature writing as a literary category and expand our own writing practice as we consider the interconnected web of ecology that holds, sustains, and profoundly intersects each of our lives.

The theme for this session is: Writing from the RootsWhat are the places that have most profoundly shaped you—as a human animal and as a writer? What are your practices and techniques for weaving landscapes into your work? How can we better listen to the multifaceted, multilayered voices of the places we call home? 

This is a Virtual Event

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here

About:

(Isael Maxakali, Sueli Maxakali, Carolina Canguçu & Roberto Romero, Brazil, 2020, 70 min, in Maxakali & Portuguese with English subtitles)

This Land is Our Land! is a powerful and urgent profile of the Maxakali or Tikmu’un, a Brazilian indigenous group struggling with the impacts of deforestation and white vigilante violence. Threaded through with folklore and ancient wisdom, the film implores the viewer to remember that “The earth is our kin!”

Its Tikmu’un subjects wander through a landscape transformed by agriculture: trees replaced with cattle feed, ponds no longer hospitable to fish, roads overtaken by native plants, and fields cordoned off with barbed wire. Even the limits of their reserve have been encroached upon in recent years. As they walk familiar, primordial paths, they pray that the land will one day belong to them and the yãmĩyxop spirits once again.

Animated by raw anger and resentment, they also decry a double standard where murders against Tikmu’un go unpunished while they are over-penalized for petty crimes. Tense interactions with hostile white strangers are evidence of pervasive prejudice. But as This Land is Our Land! powerfully demonstrates, the Maxakali remain defiant in the face of colonization, determined to tell their stories. They will continue to chant in unison, “This land is our land!”

 

View Event

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here.

Sun Inside tells the interlinked stories of four Brazilian teens living in the slums of Rio de Janeiro as they graduate into an uncertain future. The good-natured Junior films everything around him on his shaky hand-held camera. His sarcastic best friend Karol fantasizes about living in Japan while fruitlessly job-hunting. Their friends Caio and Ronaldo struggle to define their Yoruba-Christian faith and sexuality, respectively. In a landscape of dilapidated housing and skies crowded with power lines, they learn to make their own fun. Yet the turmoil of power outages, water shortages, and teacher strikes is always threatening to encroach.

Sun Inside captures the energy of languid afternoons at the beach and intoxicating nights at underground concerts. In tracing the currents of exhilaration and boredom, self-discovery and self-doubt, the film poignantly explores what it means to be on the cusp of adulthood.

View Event
Northwest Film Forum
Seattle, WA

May 19–22 [In-Person] / May 19–29 [Online]

This festival of contemporary Brazilian films gives marginalized voices the mic in discussions of race, sexuality, and governance. The 2022 fest runs May 19–22 in personMay 19–29 online, with short films about the ebbs and flows of life, identity, and belonging and fierce features from a metacinematic kidnapping drama to an enduring saga of Indigenous Brazilians’ fight for land rights.

Curated by Emanuella Rodrigues de Moraes, Livia Lima, andCalac Nogueira, with support from Professor Jonathan Warren, Director of the Center for Brazilian Studies. 2022 festival graphic design is by Lucas Franco Colusso.

 

Festival Passes:

IN-PERSON-ONLY or VIRTUAL-ONLY FESTIVAL PASSES

  • $30 NWFF Members
  • $45–75 General; priced on a sliding scale

HYBRID FESTIVAL PASS (both in-person and virtual)

  • $40 NWFF Members
  • $55–85 General; priced on a sliding scale

NWFF offers a limited number of free festival passes for BIPOCLGBTQ+disabled, and/or low-income patrons who would not be able to attend due to financial reasons. Read more and reserve your pass (by May 9, please!) here >

View Event
Book Larder
Seattle , WA

Join @lukasvolger for an in-store Author Talk on May 26th at 6:30pm for his new book Snacks for Dinner! We love Lukas and are so excited for this book, which transforms carefree noshing into nourishing meals.

Lukas will demo three dishes from Snacks For Dinner, and you’ll get to take home a snack box with those dishes as well as a signed copy of the book.

Search “Snacks” on website to sign up for the event, or pre-order a signed copy of the book if you’re not able to attend.

This event can be found on Instagram

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Virtual

PART 1: Thursday, May 26, 2022 | 7:00-8:30 PM PDT | VIRTUAL | FREE

(Part 2 will be Thursday, July 21, 2022 | 7:00-8:30 PM PDT | VIRTUAL | FREE)

The Wing Luke Museum continues an exploration of regional history and colonialism with personal stories from the early AANHPI communities – panelists who trace their ancestry back to the 1800s and early 1900s – on the theme “why we are here.” Through these personal narratives, we can better understand both the contributions of AANHPI labor and intellect, as well as the roots of racism that still impact us today.

Panelists for Part 1:

  • Nemah Choubaquak (Nisqually/Puyallup/Taidnapam/Klickitat/Kanaka, and direct descendant of John Kalama, who came to the Pacific Northwest from Hawai’i in the 1830s)

  • Bettie Luke (Chinese ancestry, whose father and grandfather had worked in this region before her family settled in Seattle, where Bettie was born)

  • Daniel Pak (Korean ancestry, whose ancestors were among the first from Korea to settle in Hawai’i)

  • Kulwant S. Johl (Sikh/Punjabi, whose grandfather came to Bellingham in 1907).

Please see panelists for Part 2 on the event listing for Thursday, July 21, 2022.

View Event

Watch online: May. 19–29, 2022

Watch in person: May 20 at 7:30pm & May 22 at 5pm

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here.

Can the future foresee the past? Can it reinvent the way we interpret the histories and documents that arrived in our time? Drawing on archival materials and oral testimonies, the films in this program introduce underrepresented groups or individuals as narrators of their own stories.

Pode o futuro prever o passado? Ou reinventar a forma como interpretamos as histórias e os documentos que chegaram até nossos tempos? Usando imagens de arquivo, os filmes-ensaios desta sessão apresentam indivíduos ou grupos sub-representados como narradores de suas próprias histórias.

 

View Event
Northwest Film Forum
Seattle, WA

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here.

From a romance between two young Black women to a street dance battle for the most enthralling choreography, the films presented in this program focus on Black communities’ narratives; their resistance movements in social and imaginary spaces.

Do envolvimento amoroso entre duas jovens negras até a competição de street dance pela coreografia mais contagiante, os filmes reunidos nesta sessão concentram narrativas de comunidades negras, seus movimentos de resistência por espaços sociais e imaginários.

 

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event

“Nature writing” is its own genre in the literary world, but increasingly writers and readers are pushing past the boundaries of what has traditionally constituted writing about the “environment.” A growing number of diverse voices and perspectives are exploring what it means to encounter and to be in relationship with the living world as a complex and multifaceted web of life that has agency and animism—of which the human story is but one part.

This course seeks to expand our understanding of nature writing as both a genre and a practice. We will welcome several guest writers—Rebecca Giggs, Charles Foster, Lucy Jones, Lia Purpura, and Jamie Figueroa—to help us push the bounds of nature writing as a literary category and expand our own writing practice as we consider the interconnected web of ecology that holds, sustains, and profoundly intersects each of our lives.

The theme for this session is: Writing from the RootsWhat are the places that have most profoundly shaped you—as a human animal and as a writer? What are your practices and techniques for weaving landscapes into your work? How can we better listen to the multifaceted, multilayered voices of the places we call home? 

This is a Virtual Event

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Ina Maka Family Program
Seattle, WA

Our next group connection is going to be IN PERSON

Come paint with us and other Ina Maka families at our Columbia City office on Friday, May 27th.

This event is posted on the organizations instagram @inamakafamilyprogram

View Event
Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

 

The 51st Annual Northwest Folklife Festival takes place in person at the Seattle Center and virtually right here, on Memorial Day Weekend, May 27-30, 2022

Vaccines will be required for all participants at the Festival! Click below to read through our COVID safety plan and guidelines

Northwest Folklife’s 2022 Cultural Focus, Metamorphosis: In with the Old, In with the New, celebrates people’s natural propensity for change. This pandemic has proven to be one of those unique moments in our time; a turning point where we can point our compass true north, see the writing on the wall, and meet the challenges ahead.

A once-in-a-lifetime challenge offers us the opportunity for a once-in-a-lifetime solution. It is in moments like these when emerging ideas, movements, and practices can become new conventions; when new thoughts branch from older ones, connecting us to our past, and propelling us to our future; where changing perspectives can be fostered, not feared, or ignored. In with the old, and in with the new!

​​This year’s cultural focus looks to our present, the urgency of now, and how that paves paths for our future. How do we translate the legacies and traditions of our fore-bearers and reflect them in our current selves, with our current identities, and our current conditions? How do we prepare and propel our current selves for the future we want to see? How is this unbroken circle reflected in the common good that exists in all cultures?

This year’s approach to our annual poster design is going to emulate our cultural focus in a few ways. Metamorphosis is the process that a caterpillar goes through to become a moth or a butterfly. There is inevitability in that change; there is growth in that change; there is spontaneity in that change; and, there is transformation in that change.

We have invited 4 artists to collaborate on this design process, which will be split up into respective phases. Each artist will contribute a layer, each layer building on the previous artist’s contribution. Like a relay race, not only will each artist be responsible for their own leg of the race, but the interim moments of passing the baton, and that exchange of ideas between each artist’s transition, will equally influence the direction of the art.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here

About:

(Isael Maxakali, Sueli Maxakali, Carolina Canguçu & Roberto Romero, Brazil, 2020, 70 min, in Maxakali & Portuguese with English subtitles)

This Land is Our Land! is a powerful and urgent profile of the Maxakali or Tikmu’un, a Brazilian indigenous group struggling with the impacts of deforestation and white vigilante violence. Threaded through with folklore and ancient wisdom, the film implores the viewer to remember that “The earth is our kin!”

Its Tikmu’un subjects wander through a landscape transformed by agriculture: trees replaced with cattle feed, ponds no longer hospitable to fish, roads overtaken by native plants, and fields cordoned off with barbed wire. Even the limits of their reserve have been encroached upon in recent years. As they walk familiar, primordial paths, they pray that the land will one day belong to them and the yãmĩyxop spirits once again.

Animated by raw anger and resentment, they also decry a double standard where murders against Tikmu’un go unpunished while they are over-penalized for petty crimes. Tense interactions with hostile white strangers are evidence of pervasive prejudice. But as This Land is Our Land! powerfully demonstrates, the Maxakali remain defiant in the face of colonization, determined to tell their stories. They will continue to chant in unison, “This land is our land!”

 

View Event

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here.

Sun Inside tells the interlinked stories of four Brazilian teens living in the slums of Rio de Janeiro as they graduate into an uncertain future. The good-natured Junior films everything around him on his shaky hand-held camera. His sarcastic best friend Karol fantasizes about living in Japan while fruitlessly job-hunting. Their friends Caio and Ronaldo struggle to define their Yoruba-Christian faith and sexuality, respectively. In a landscape of dilapidated housing and skies crowded with power lines, they learn to make their own fun. Yet the turmoil of power outages, water shortages, and teacher strikes is always threatening to encroach.

Sun Inside captures the energy of languid afternoons at the beach and intoxicating nights at underground concerts. In tracing the currents of exhilaration and boredom, self-discovery and self-doubt, the film poignantly explores what it means to be on the cusp of adulthood.

View Event
Northwest Film Forum
Seattle, WA

May 19–22 [In-Person] / May 19–29 [Online]

This festival of contemporary Brazilian films gives marginalized voices the mic in discussions of race, sexuality, and governance. The 2022 fest runs May 19–22 in personMay 19–29 online, with short films about the ebbs and flows of life, identity, and belonging and fierce features from a metacinematic kidnapping drama to an enduring saga of Indigenous Brazilians’ fight for land rights.

Curated by Emanuella Rodrigues de Moraes, Livia Lima, andCalac Nogueira, with support from Professor Jonathan Warren, Director of the Center for Brazilian Studies. 2022 festival graphic design is by Lucas Franco Colusso.

 

Festival Passes:

IN-PERSON-ONLY or VIRTUAL-ONLY FESTIVAL PASSES

  • $30 NWFF Members
  • $45–75 General; priced on a sliding scale

HYBRID FESTIVAL PASS (both in-person and virtual)

  • $40 NWFF Members
  • $55–85 General; priced on a sliding scale

NWFF offers a limited number of free festival passes for BIPOCLGBTQ+disabled, and/or low-income patrons who would not be able to attend due to financial reasons. Read more and reserve your pass (by May 9, please!) here >

View Event

Watch online: May. 19–29, 2022

Watch in person: May 20 at 7:30pm & May 22 at 5pm

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here.

Can the future foresee the past? Can it reinvent the way we interpret the histories and documents that arrived in our time? Drawing on archival materials and oral testimonies, the films in this program introduce underrepresented groups or individuals as narrators of their own stories.

Pode o futuro prever o passado? Ou reinventar a forma como interpretamos as histórias e os documentos que chegaram até nossos tempos? Usando imagens de arquivo, os filmes-ensaios desta sessão apresentam indivíduos ou grupos sub-representados como narradores de suas próprias histórias.

 

View Event
Northwest Film Forum
Seattle, WA

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here.

From a romance between two young Black women to a street dance battle for the most enthralling choreography, the films presented in this program focus on Black communities’ narratives; their resistance movements in social and imaginary spaces.

Do envolvimento amoroso entre duas jovens negras até a competição de street dance pela coreografia mais contagiante, os filmes reunidos nesta sessão concentram narrativas de comunidades negras, seus movimentos de resistência por espaços sociais e imaginários.

 

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
African Community Housing and Development
Seattle, WA

2022 Season Starts MAY 14th!
See you there!

2nd & 4th Saturdays
May through October
10am – 2pm

View Event

“Nature writing” is its own genre in the literary world, but increasingly writers and readers are pushing past the boundaries of what has traditionally constituted writing about the “environment.” A growing number of diverse voices and perspectives are exploring what it means to encounter and to be in relationship with the living world as a complex and multifaceted web of life that has agency and animism—of which the human story is but one part.

This course seeks to expand our understanding of nature writing as both a genre and a practice. We will welcome several guest writers—Rebecca Giggs, Charles Foster, Lucy Jones, Lia Purpura, and Jamie Figueroa—to help us push the bounds of nature writing as a literary category and expand our own writing practice as we consider the interconnected web of ecology that holds, sustains, and profoundly intersects each of our lives.

The theme for this session is: Writing from the RootsWhat are the places that have most profoundly shaped you—as a human animal and as a writer? What are your practices and techniques for weaving landscapes into your work? How can we better listen to the multifaceted, multilayered voices of the places we call home? 

This is a Virtual Event

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

 

The 51st Annual Northwest Folklife Festival takes place in person at the Seattle Center and virtually right here, on Memorial Day Weekend, May 27-30, 2022

Vaccines will be required for all participants at the Festival! Click below to read through our COVID safety plan and guidelines

Northwest Folklife’s 2022 Cultural Focus, Metamorphosis: In with the Old, In with the New, celebrates people’s natural propensity for change. This pandemic has proven to be one of those unique moments in our time; a turning point where we can point our compass true north, see the writing on the wall, and meet the challenges ahead.

A once-in-a-lifetime challenge offers us the opportunity for a once-in-a-lifetime solution. It is in moments like these when emerging ideas, movements, and practices can become new conventions; when new thoughts branch from older ones, connecting us to our past, and propelling us to our future; where changing perspectives can be fostered, not feared, or ignored. In with the old, and in with the new!

​​This year’s cultural focus looks to our present, the urgency of now, and how that paves paths for our future. How do we translate the legacies and traditions of our fore-bearers and reflect them in our current selves, with our current identities, and our current conditions? How do we prepare and propel our current selves for the future we want to see? How is this unbroken circle reflected in the common good that exists in all cultures?

This year’s approach to our annual poster design is going to emulate our cultural focus in a few ways. Metamorphosis is the process that a caterpillar goes through to become a moth or a butterfly. There is inevitability in that change; there is growth in that change; there is spontaneity in that change; and, there is transformation in that change.

We have invited 4 artists to collaborate on this design process, which will be split up into respective phases. Each artist will contribute a layer, each layer building on the previous artist’s contribution. Like a relay race, not only will each artist be responsible for their own leg of the race, but the interim moments of passing the baton, and that exchange of ideas between each artist’s transition, will equally influence the direction of the art.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here

About:

(Isael Maxakali, Sueli Maxakali, Carolina Canguçu & Roberto Romero, Brazil, 2020, 70 min, in Maxakali & Portuguese with English subtitles)

This Land is Our Land! is a powerful and urgent profile of the Maxakali or Tikmu’un, a Brazilian indigenous group struggling with the impacts of deforestation and white vigilante violence. Threaded through with folklore and ancient wisdom, the film implores the viewer to remember that “The earth is our kin!”

Its Tikmu’un subjects wander through a landscape transformed by agriculture: trees replaced with cattle feed, ponds no longer hospitable to fish, roads overtaken by native plants, and fields cordoned off with barbed wire. Even the limits of their reserve have been encroached upon in recent years. As they walk familiar, primordial paths, they pray that the land will one day belong to them and the yãmĩyxop spirits once again.

Animated by raw anger and resentment, they also decry a double standard where murders against Tikmu’un go unpunished while they are over-penalized for petty crimes. Tense interactions with hostile white strangers are evidence of pervasive prejudice. But as This Land is Our Land! powerfully demonstrates, the Maxakali remain defiant in the face of colonization, determined to tell their stories. They will continue to chant in unison, “This land is our land!”

 

View Event

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here.

Sun Inside tells the interlinked stories of four Brazilian teens living in the slums of Rio de Janeiro as they graduate into an uncertain future. The good-natured Junior films everything around him on his shaky hand-held camera. His sarcastic best friend Karol fantasizes about living in Japan while fruitlessly job-hunting. Their friends Caio and Ronaldo struggle to define their Yoruba-Christian faith and sexuality, respectively. In a landscape of dilapidated housing and skies crowded with power lines, they learn to make their own fun. Yet the turmoil of power outages, water shortages, and teacher strikes is always threatening to encroach.

Sun Inside captures the energy of languid afternoons at the beach and intoxicating nights at underground concerts. In tracing the currents of exhilaration and boredom, self-discovery and self-doubt, the film poignantly explores what it means to be on the cusp of adulthood.

View Event
Northwest Film Forum
Seattle, WA

May 19–22 [In-Person] / May 19–29 [Online]

This festival of contemporary Brazilian films gives marginalized voices the mic in discussions of race, sexuality, and governance. The 2022 fest runs May 19–22 in personMay 19–29 online, with short films about the ebbs and flows of life, identity, and belonging and fierce features from a metacinematic kidnapping drama to an enduring saga of Indigenous Brazilians’ fight for land rights.

Curated by Emanuella Rodrigues de Moraes, Livia Lima, andCalac Nogueira, with support from Professor Jonathan Warren, Director of the Center for Brazilian Studies. 2022 festival graphic design is by Lucas Franco Colusso.

 

Festival Passes:

IN-PERSON-ONLY or VIRTUAL-ONLY FESTIVAL PASSES

  • $30 NWFF Members
  • $45–75 General; priced on a sliding scale

HYBRID FESTIVAL PASS (both in-person and virtual)

  • $40 NWFF Members
  • $55–85 General; priced on a sliding scale

NWFF offers a limited number of free festival passes for BIPOCLGBTQ+disabled, and/or low-income patrons who would not be able to attend due to financial reasons. Read more and reserve your pass (by May 9, please!) here >

View Event

Watch online: May. 19–29, 2022

Watch in person: May 20 at 7:30pm & May 22 at 5pm

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here.

Can the future foresee the past? Can it reinvent the way we interpret the histories and documents that arrived in our time? Drawing on archival materials and oral testimonies, the films in this program introduce underrepresented groups or individuals as narrators of their own stories.

Pode o futuro prever o passado? Ou reinventar a forma como interpretamos as histórias e os documentos que chegaram até nossos tempos? Usando imagens de arquivo, os filmes-ensaios desta sessão apresentam indivíduos ou grupos sub-representados como narradores de suas próprias histórias.

 

View Event
Northwest Film Forum
Seattle, WA

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here.

From a romance between two young Black women to a street dance battle for the most enthralling choreography, the films presented in this program focus on Black communities’ narratives; their resistance movements in social and imaginary spaces.

Do envolvimento amoroso entre duas jovens negras até a competição de street dance pela coreografia mais contagiante, os filmes reunidos nesta sessão concentram narrativas de comunidades negras, seus movimentos de resistência por espaços sociais e imaginários.

 

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event

“Nature writing” is its own genre in the literary world, but increasingly writers and readers are pushing past the boundaries of what has traditionally constituted writing about the “environment.” A growing number of diverse voices and perspectives are exploring what it means to encounter and to be in relationship with the living world as a complex and multifaceted web of life that has agency and animism—of which the human story is but one part.

This course seeks to expand our understanding of nature writing as both a genre and a practice. We will welcome several guest writers—Rebecca Giggs, Charles Foster, Lucy Jones, Lia Purpura, and Jamie Figueroa—to help us push the bounds of nature writing as a literary category and expand our own writing practice as we consider the interconnected web of ecology that holds, sustains, and profoundly intersects each of our lives.

The theme for this session is: Writing from the RootsWhat are the places that have most profoundly shaped you—as a human animal and as a writer? What are your practices and techniques for weaving landscapes into your work? How can we better listen to the multifaceted, multilayered voices of the places we call home? 

This is a Virtual Event

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

 

The 51st Annual Northwest Folklife Festival takes place in person at the Seattle Center and virtually right here, on Memorial Day Weekend, May 27-30, 2022

Vaccines will be required for all participants at the Festival! Click below to read through our COVID safety plan and guidelines

Northwest Folklife’s 2022 Cultural Focus, Metamorphosis: In with the Old, In with the New, celebrates people’s natural propensity for change. This pandemic has proven to be one of those unique moments in our time; a turning point where we can point our compass true north, see the writing on the wall, and meet the challenges ahead.

A once-in-a-lifetime challenge offers us the opportunity for a once-in-a-lifetime solution. It is in moments like these when emerging ideas, movements, and practices can become new conventions; when new thoughts branch from older ones, connecting us to our past, and propelling us to our future; where changing perspectives can be fostered, not feared, or ignored. In with the old, and in with the new!

​​This year’s cultural focus looks to our present, the urgency of now, and how that paves paths for our future. How do we translate the legacies and traditions of our fore-bearers and reflect them in our current selves, with our current identities, and our current conditions? How do we prepare and propel our current selves for the future we want to see? How is this unbroken circle reflected in the common good that exists in all cultures?

This year’s approach to our annual poster design is going to emulate our cultural focus in a few ways. Metamorphosis is the process that a caterpillar goes through to become a moth or a butterfly. There is inevitability in that change; there is growth in that change; there is spontaneity in that change; and, there is transformation in that change.

We have invited 4 artists to collaborate on this design process, which will be split up into respective phases. Each artist will contribute a layer, each layer building on the previous artist’s contribution. Like a relay race, not only will each artist be responsible for their own leg of the race, but the interim moments of passing the baton, and that exchange of ideas between each artist’s transition, will equally influence the direction of the art.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here

About:

(Isael Maxakali, Sueli Maxakali, Carolina Canguçu & Roberto Romero, Brazil, 2020, 70 min, in Maxakali & Portuguese with English subtitles)

This Land is Our Land! is a powerful and urgent profile of the Maxakali or Tikmu’un, a Brazilian indigenous group struggling with the impacts of deforestation and white vigilante violence. Threaded through with folklore and ancient wisdom, the film implores the viewer to remember that “The earth is our kin!”

Its Tikmu’un subjects wander through a landscape transformed by agriculture: trees replaced with cattle feed, ponds no longer hospitable to fish, roads overtaken by native plants, and fields cordoned off with barbed wire. Even the limits of their reserve have been encroached upon in recent years. As they walk familiar, primordial paths, they pray that the land will one day belong to them and the yãmĩyxop spirits once again.

Animated by raw anger and resentment, they also decry a double standard where murders against Tikmu’un go unpunished while they are over-penalized for petty crimes. Tense interactions with hostile white strangers are evidence of pervasive prejudice. But as This Land is Our Land! powerfully demonstrates, the Maxakali remain defiant in the face of colonization, determined to tell their stories. They will continue to chant in unison, “This land is our land!”

 

View Event

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here.

Sun Inside tells the interlinked stories of four Brazilian teens living in the slums of Rio de Janeiro as they graduate into an uncertain future. The good-natured Junior films everything around him on his shaky hand-held camera. His sarcastic best friend Karol fantasizes about living in Japan while fruitlessly job-hunting. Their friends Caio and Ronaldo struggle to define their Yoruba-Christian faith and sexuality, respectively. In a landscape of dilapidated housing and skies crowded with power lines, they learn to make their own fun. Yet the turmoil of power outages, water shortages, and teacher strikes is always threatening to encroach.

Sun Inside captures the energy of languid afternoons at the beach and intoxicating nights at underground concerts. In tracing the currents of exhilaration and boredom, self-discovery and self-doubt, the film poignantly explores what it means to be on the cusp of adulthood.

View Event
Northwest Film Forum
Seattle, WA

May 19–22 [In-Person] / May 19–29 [Online]

This festival of contemporary Brazilian films gives marginalized voices the mic in discussions of race, sexuality, and governance. The 2022 fest runs May 19–22 in personMay 19–29 online, with short films about the ebbs and flows of life, identity, and belonging and fierce features from a metacinematic kidnapping drama to an enduring saga of Indigenous Brazilians’ fight for land rights.

Curated by Emanuella Rodrigues de Moraes, Livia Lima, andCalac Nogueira, with support from Professor Jonathan Warren, Director of the Center for Brazilian Studies. 2022 festival graphic design is by Lucas Franco Colusso.

 

Festival Passes:

IN-PERSON-ONLY or VIRTUAL-ONLY FESTIVAL PASSES

  • $30 NWFF Members
  • $45–75 General; priced on a sliding scale

HYBRID FESTIVAL PASS (both in-person and virtual)

  • $40 NWFF Members
  • $55–85 General; priced on a sliding scale

NWFF offers a limited number of free festival passes for BIPOCLGBTQ+disabled, and/or low-income patrons who would not be able to attend due to financial reasons. Read more and reserve your pass (by May 9, please!) here >

View Event

Watch online: May. 19–29, 2022

Watch in person: May 20 at 7:30pm & May 22 at 5pm

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here.

Can the future foresee the past? Can it reinvent the way we interpret the histories and documents that arrived in our time? Drawing on archival materials and oral testimonies, the films in this program introduce underrepresented groups or individuals as narrators of their own stories.

Pode o futuro prever o passado? Ou reinventar a forma como interpretamos as histórias e os documentos que chegaram até nossos tempos? Usando imagens de arquivo, os filmes-ensaios desta sessão apresentam indivíduos ou grupos sub-representados como narradores de suas próprias histórias.

 

View Event
Northwest Film Forum
Seattle, WA

In-person tickets

$13 General Admission
$10 Student/Child/Senior
$7 Member

Virtual tickets

Sliding scale, $5–25

Travessias 2022 is a hybrid virtual-and-in-person festival. There are three categories of festival pass: VIRTUAL, IN-PERSON, and HYBRID (virtual AND in-person), all available here. Proof of vaccination and masks are still required for NWFF patrons! Full Covid policies here.

From a romance between two young Black women to a street dance battle for the most enthralling choreography, the films presented in this program focus on Black communities’ narratives; their resistance movements in social and imaginary spaces.

Do envolvimento amoroso entre duas jovens negras até a competição de street dance pela coreografia mais contagiante, os filmes reunidos nesta sessão concentram narrativas de comunidades negras, seus movimentos de resistência por espaços sociais e imaginários.

 

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event

“Nature writing” is its own genre in the literary world, but increasingly writers and readers are pushing past the boundaries of what has traditionally constituted writing about the “environment.” A growing number of diverse voices and perspectives are exploring what it means to encounter and to be in relationship with the living world as a complex and multifaceted web of life that has agency and animism—of which the human story is but one part.

This course seeks to expand our understanding of nature writing as both a genre and a practice. We will welcome several guest writers—Rebecca Giggs, Charles Foster, Lucy Jones, Lia Purpura, and Jamie Figueroa—to help us push the bounds of nature writing as a literary category and expand our own writing practice as we consider the interconnected web of ecology that holds, sustains, and profoundly intersects each of our lives.

The theme for this session is: Writing from the RootsWhat are the places that have most profoundly shaped you—as a human animal and as a writer? What are your practices and techniques for weaving landscapes into your work? How can we better listen to the multifaceted, multilayered voices of the places we call home? 

This is a Virtual Event

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Northwest Folklife
Seattle, WA

 

The 51st Annual Northwest Folklife Festival takes place in person at the Seattle Center and virtually right here, on Memorial Day Weekend, May 27-30, 2022

Vaccines will be required for all participants at the Festival! Click below to read through our COVID safety plan and guidelines

Northwest Folklife’s 2022 Cultural Focus, Metamorphosis: In with the Old, In with the New, celebrates people’s natural propensity for change. This pandemic has proven to be one of those unique moments in our time; a turning point where we can point our compass true north, see the writing on the wall, and meet the challenges ahead.

A once-in-a-lifetime challenge offers us the opportunity for a once-in-a-lifetime solution. It is in moments like these when emerging ideas, movements, and practices can become new conventions; when new thoughts branch from older ones, connecting us to our past, and propelling us to our future; where changing perspectives can be fostered, not feared, or ignored. In with the old, and in with the new!

​​This year’s cultural focus looks to our present, the urgency of now, and how that paves paths for our future. How do we translate the legacies and traditions of our fore-bearers and reflect them in our current selves, with our current identities, and our current conditions? How do we prepare and propel our current selves for the future we want to see? How is this unbroken circle reflected in the common good that exists in all cultures?

This year’s approach to our annual poster design is going to emulate our cultural focus in a few ways. Metamorphosis is the process that a caterpillar goes through to become a moth or a butterfly. There is inevitability in that change; there is growth in that change; there is spontaneity in that change; and, there is transformation in that change.

We have invited 4 artists to collaborate on this design process, which will be split up into respective phases. Each artist will contribute a layer, each layer building on the previous artist’s contribution. Like a relay race, not only will each artist be responsible for their own leg of the race, but the interim moments of passing the baton, and that exchange of ideas between each artist’s transition, will equally influence the direction of the art.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event

“Nature writing” is its own genre in the literary world, but increasingly writers and readers are pushing past the boundaries of what has traditionally constituted writing about the “environment.” A growing number of diverse voices and perspectives are exploring what it means to encounter and to be in relationship with the living world as a complex and multifaceted web of life that has agency and animism—of which the human story is but one part.

This course seeks to expand our understanding of nature writing as both a genre and a practice. We will welcome several guest writers—Rebecca Giggs, Charles Foster, Lucy Jones, Lia Purpura, and Jamie Figueroa—to help us push the bounds of nature writing as a literary category and expand our own writing practice as we consider the interconnected web of ecology that holds, sustains, and profoundly intersects each of our lives.

The theme for this session is: Writing from the RootsWhat are the places that have most profoundly shaped you—as a human animal and as a writer? What are your practices and techniques for weaving landscapes into your work? How can we better listen to the multifaceted, multilayered voices of the places we call home? 

This is a Virtual Event

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Virtual

Tuesday, May 31, 2022 | 5:30 PM PST | Zoom | FREE

Join friends near and far as you compete for prizes on Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Island themed trivia. Play from home via Zoom and Crowdpurr.

To play, you will need access to a computer and a mobile device. Or, if you are a dynamo, access to view split screens on your computer.

*Top winner receives a $25 gift card to a local business or a large surprise box of themed items. Other two runner ups will receive gift items or swag.

A Zoom link will be sent to your email after you register with extra information on how to connect on Crowdpurr. You will be able to interact with our staff during the program.

Free. Donations accepted.

Presented by the Tateuchi Foundation and IMLS.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event

“Nature writing” is its own genre in the literary world, but increasingly writers and readers are pushing past the boundaries of what has traditionally constituted writing about the “environment.” A growing number of diverse voices and perspectives are exploring what it means to encounter and to be in relationship with the living world as a complex and multifaceted web of life that has agency and animism—of which the human story is but one part.

This course seeks to expand our understanding of nature writing as both a genre and a practice. We will welcome several guest writers—Rebecca Giggs, Charles Foster, Lucy Jones, Lia Purpura, and Jamie Figueroa—to help us push the bounds of nature writing as a literary category and expand our own writing practice as we consider the interconnected web of ecology that holds, sustains, and profoundly intersects each of our lives.

The theme for this session is: Writing from the RootsWhat are the places that have most profoundly shaped you—as a human animal and as a writer? What are your practices and techniques for weaving landscapes into your work? How can we better listen to the multifaceted, multilayered voices of the places we call home? 

This is a Virtual Event

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Virual

Thursday, June 2, 2022 | 11 AM PST | Facebook | Free

June is Pride Month! Join us for a beautifully written and illustrated book that follows a star and a sea star on their magical journey of finding compassion, courage, an inclusive community and the power of a hug. Thank you to the author, Cindy Wong, for sharing this book that feels like a hug! Illustrated by ShiShi Nguyen.

Story Time is presented by the Tateuchi Foundation and Institute for Museum and Library Services.

Follow Cindy Wong @starhugbooks

You can find Starhug and other books for all ages at our Marketplace, open Wednesday-Sunday 10am-5pm.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
Arts Corps
Seattle, WA

Art & Sol, will be happening on June 4th, 12pm-4pm at the Bethaday Community Learning Space.

Join us to  celebrate the power of youth creativity, development, and community at TAF Bethany community Learning Space. There will be performances, an art show, and art activities for the whole family. Lunch will be provided.

 

This event is available on their instagram

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
Coalition of Communities of Color
Portland, OR

Summary:
Join us for an in-person celebration of 20 years of advocacy, research, and leadership for racial justice.

This will be our first face-to-face community event in over two years. We’ll have food, drinks, music, images, and stories from the past two decades, speakers and community leaders sharing their reflections, and plenty of time to catch up with each other and connect. This will also be our biggest fundraising event of the year.

Program:
Doors open at 5:30 pm for mingling with a wide selection of appetizers and drinks followed by a set of speakers at 7:00 pm where we will hear from environmental justice advocate Anjeanette Brown and Portland City Commissioner Carmen Rubio alongside our Executive Director Marcus Mundy and Board Chair Tony DeFalco. Guests will be welcome to continue mingling over drinks and hors d’oeuvres until 9:00 pm.

We so hope you will join us and help reflect on our first 20 years while building a strong foundation for the next 20 years of coming together for racial justice. No celebration would be complete without everyone who has come together to make our collective successes a reality.

If you cannot attend in-person, we plan on livestreaming the “program hour” with our featured speakers to our YouTube channel.

COVID-19 Note:
We will be continually assessing what protocols make sense for preventing the spread of COVID-19. The Redd East is a large space with good ventilation, space for outdoor mingling, and we will be opening up the space to the maximum extent possible to promote high air exchange. While masking requirements have been lifted in our area, we welcome attendees to use face coverings at the event, according to their needs and comfort level. We may ask our guests to wear a mask depending on case rates and community spread. We will be in touch leading up to the event with updates.

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
African Community Housing and Development
Seattle, WA

2022 Season Starts MAY 14th!
See you there!

2nd & 4th Saturdays
May through October
10am – 2pm

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Nordic Northwest
Portland , OR

Decorate the Maypole and make flower wreaths, indulge in Nordic summer delicacies, play games on the lawn, and enjoy – this is Midsummer!

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Seattle Center Festál
Seattle, WA

Seattle Center Festál presents Indigenous People Festival in partnership with Seattle Indian Health Board (SIHB). The festival provides a venue for Native people to celebrate their unique cultures through song, dance, performances, art, food, and the sharing of indigenous knowledge.

This event is free and open to the public.

HISTORY

Seattle Indian Health Board (SIHB) is a community health clinic that provides health and human services to its patients, while specializing in the care of Native people. The organization is recognized as a leader in the promotion of health improvement for urban American Indians and Alaska Natives, locally and nationally.

Today, SIHB operates two sites and is in the process of opening two more. The organization serves approximately 6,000 patients annually in King County, and more than 4,000 of those identify as American Indian and/or Alaska Native, and  employs more than 200 people. 

SIHB opened its doors to the community in 1970. In the 1960s, Native activists refused to let urban Indians go unseen and ignored any longer, which inspired the formation of a number of Native organizations, including SIHB. For the first time, urban Indians in Seattle had access to healthcare and services by organizations that were operated by Native people for Native people.

Seattle Indian Health Board (SIHB) is a private, non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • 7 out of 10 American Indians and Alaska Natives live in urban areas.
  • Urban Indians are tribal people currently living off federally-defined tribal lands in urban areas and are often an overlooked population in society, despite representing the majority of American Indians and Alaska Natives throughout the country
View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA

March 19 – June 12, 2022 

From the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

WHEN THE FIRST GREEN BOOK WAS PUBLISHED in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Freedom to change your present situation, freedom to determine your destiny, freedom to travel. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. Imagine the indignity of government-backed and socially-normalized oppression. Imagine the pain, the violence, the disrespect. And yet and still, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, their worth, their light, and took to the roads.

It was done with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“…the traveling was and wasn’t fun…We couldn’t eat in the restaurants in the South and so we had to go in the market to get what you called ‘souse’ [hogshead cheese] and white saltine crackers. But listen, darling, I loved souse…That was fun. We’d laugh right on down the highway and still have a good time.”

— ARETHA FRANKLIN, vocalist, composer/arranger, and civil rights activist

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, department stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” Published annually through 1967, the national guide’s rich history is highlighted in the multimedia exhibition, The Negro Motorist Green Book. This exhibition was curated by Candacy Taylor, one of the nation’s leading Green-Book scholars and an award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Visitors will get an immersive look at the reality of travel for African Americans in mid-century America, and how The Green Book served as an indispensable resource for the nation’s rising African American middle class. You’ll be transported back to a time when, if you were Black, it took bravery and a Green Book to cross the country safely; explore film, photographs, art installations, interactives, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners; compare Green Book sites then and now; and appreciate historical objects from the Smithsonian and from a variety of Green Book sites. You’ll understand not only the apprehension felt by African American travelers, but also the resilience, innovation, and elegance of people choosing to live a full American existence. The exhibition also brings into focus the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and the important role “The Green Book” played in facilitating the second wave of the Great Migration is brought into view.

View Event
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event

More so than most cities, Seattle has shaped itself to suit its needs. Seattle has removed hills, filled tide flats, and created a completely new downtown shoreline. Join author David B. Williams on a 1.5 mile walking tour to explore the last vestiges of the former downtown bluffs, trace the lost island of Seattle, and examine how the subterranean fill still affects the modern landscape.

This walking tour starts at the intersection of Alaskan Way and Lenora Street along the waterfront and ends at Occidental Park. The tour is planned to occur the third Wednesday of each month running March through August. Recommended age: 4 years and older. Group size is limited, register on Eventbrite to reserve your spot for free. See our Visit Pier 62 page for tips on getting to the waterfront and frequently asked questions.

ABOUT DAVID WILLIAMS

David B. Williams is an author, naturalist, and tour guide whose new book, Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound is a deep exploration of the stories of this beautiful waterway. He is also the author of the award-winning book Too High and Too Steep: Reshaping Seattle’s Topography, as well as Seattle Walks: Discovering History and Nature in the City and Stories in Stone: Travels Through Urban Geology. Williams is a Curatorial Associate at the Burke Museum.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Outside In
Portland, OR

We welcome you to join our virtual Transgender Support Group, hosted on Thursdays from 12PM to 1PM via Zoom. This group is for anyone 18 and up who would like support from peers and our trained gender-affirming staff with topics like: coming out, coping, accessing resources, processing experiences with medical care, and more.
Email the group facilitator for more information at weeheavyw@outsidein.org
Or join our next session this Thursday, 4/21 at 12pm with this link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81359480196

Our health clinic and young adult programs strive to meet people where they are and provide safe, affirming spaces for our community to receive judgment-free care and support. Outside In is a 501(c)3 nonprofit located in Portland, OR

This event can be found on their Facebook page

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Seattle Center Festál
Seattle, WA

The board of Festival Sundiata would like to invite you to join with us in supporting Festival Sundiata presents “Black Arts Fest ′: This will be a wonderful family event held at Seattle Center . The festival celebrates the arts and educates the community about people of African descent who form a melting pot of cultures and ethnicities. The festival will encompass, music, spoken word, food, vendors, information, employment opportunities an incredible art exhibition and sale, drill team exhibition, and much, much, more. Millions of people have been touched by the Festival Sundiata experience and come back annually. The free programs will be even more entertaining, with great production value and classic performances. Most importantly, Festival Sundiata creates an opportunity to bring families and diverse communities together in unprecedented ways.

The Ultimate Art Experience is a glimpse into the talent, imagination, experiences and artistic world of African American artists. This is an opportunity for our visitors to experience these creations up close and personal. Friday night during the weekend of Festival Sundiata Black Arts Fest there will be a reception where the opportunity to meet the artists and hear their stories will be afforded to all. Festival Sundiata has a tradition of presenting breathtaking art and this year will be no different as we carry-on the tradition. One of the advantages of Festival Sundiata’s Ultimate Art Experience is the art will be available for purchase. There are many components to Festival Sundiata and the campus of Seattle Center spans many acres, however the Ultimate Art Experience is a not to be missed component, make sure you take in the Ultimate Art Experience. Our Art Curator is Ms. Kimberly Ann Phillips

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle, WA
The Henry is excited to welcome Paul Mpagi Sepuya as this year’s Monsen Photography Lecture speaker. This annual lecture brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Drs. Elaine and Joseph Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

This lecture will also be live-streamed on the Henry’s YouTube channel.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

ADMISSION

FREE. Registration for this event will open in early June. Join our e-newsletter to be notified.

ACCESS
This event is public.
ACCESSIBILITY

The museum is fully accessible by wheelchair, and we strive to provide services and accommodations for anyone who needs assistance. Assisted listening devices are available upon request. Please email contact-programs@henryart.org with particular needs or questions you may have.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Seattle Center Festál
Seattle, WA

The board of Festival Sundiata would like to invite you to join with us in supporting Festival Sundiata presents “Black Arts Fest ′: This will be a wonderful family event held at Seattle Center . The festival celebrates the arts and educates the community about people of African descent who form a melting pot of cultures and ethnicities. The festival will encompass, music, spoken word, food, vendors, information, employment opportunities an incredible art exhibition and sale, drill team exhibition, and much, much, more. Millions of people have been touched by the Festival Sundiata experience and come back annually. The free programs will be even more entertaining, with great production value and classic performances. Most importantly, Festival Sundiata creates an opportunity to bring families and diverse communities together in unprecedented ways.

The Ultimate Art Experience is a glimpse into the talent, imagination, experiences and artistic world of African American artists. This is an opportunity for our visitors to experience these creations up close and personal. Friday night during the weekend of Festival Sundiata Black Arts Fest there will be a reception where the opportunity to meet the artists and hear their stories will be afforded to all. Festival Sundiata has a tradition of presenting breathtaking art and this year will be no different as we carry-on the tradition. One of the advantages of Festival Sundiata’s Ultimate Art Experience is the art will be available for purchase. There are many components to Festival Sundiata and the campus of Seattle Center spans many acres, however the Ultimate Art Experience is a not to be missed component, make sure you take in the Ultimate Art Experience. Our Art Curator is Ms. Kimberly Ann Phillips

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Seattle Center Festál
Seattle, WA

The board of Festival Sundiata would like to invite you to join with us in supporting Festival Sundiata presents “Black Arts Fest ′: This will be a wonderful family event held at Seattle Center . The festival celebrates the arts and educates the community about people of African descent who form a melting pot of cultures and ethnicities. The festival will encompass, music, spoken word, food, vendors, information, employment opportunities an incredible art exhibition and sale, drill team exhibition, and much, much, more. Millions of people have been touched by the Festival Sundiata experience and come back annually. The free programs will be even more entertaining, with great production value and classic performances. Most importantly, Festival Sundiata creates an opportunity to bring families and diverse communities together in unprecedented ways.

The Ultimate Art Experience is a glimpse into the talent, imagination, experiences and artistic world of African American artists. This is an opportunity for our visitors to experience these creations up close and personal. Friday night during the weekend of Festival Sundiata Black Arts Fest there will be a reception where the opportunity to meet the artists and hear their stories will be afforded to all. Festival Sundiata has a tradition of presenting breathtaking art and this year will be no different as we carry-on the tradition. One of the advantages of Festival Sundiata’s Ultimate Art Experience is the art will be available for purchase. There are many components to Festival Sundiata and the campus of Seattle Center spans many acres, however the Ultimate Art Experience is a not to be missed component, make sure you take in the Ultimate Art Experience. Our Art Curator is Ms. Kimberly Ann Phillips

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Seattle Sacred Music & Art (SAMA)
Seattle, WA

Formed at school in Dublin’s late 1980’s, Kíla are heralded as one of Ireland’s most innovative and exciting bands. Their unique sound has been ever evolving, rooted in tradition, yet inspired by a myriad of influences and ideas from all around the world. Often defined as contemporary Irish World music, Kíla fuse the effects of their own melodies and Irish (Gaeilge) lyrics, Irish folk instruments such as whistles, fiddles, Uilleann pipes, bones and bodhrán with djembe, congas, drums, mandolins, brass and acoustic/electric/ bass guitars. Kíla’s eight members come from the differing musical backgrounds of  traditional, classical and rock. The result is a fresh blend of freewheeling instrumentals, furious jigs, and primal rhythms that transcend the traditional boundaries of Irish music. Bristling with passion and energy their 19th album “Alive Beo” (3rd live album) is set for official release St Patrick’s Day, March 17th.

Kíla are widely renowned for their live energetic performances and have played in over 30 countries in North America, Asia, Australia, Africa and Europe, notable festivals include The Montreux Jazz festival, WOMAD worldwide, the Sziget festival and closer to home Glastonbury and the Electric Picnic. Last year the band closed the Cambridge folk Festival on their main stage. Kíla have also had the privilege of playing the Opening Ceremony of the Special Olympics, Dublin and Possibilities, the event that welcomed the Dalai Lama to Ireland.

Kíla have worked extensively in TV and film. Their music has been placed in  many documentaries on RTÉ, TG4 and most recently in several BBC2 Timewatch documentaries. Their most notable involvement in film is their collaboration with French composer Bruno Coulais on the soundtracks for Cartoon Saloon’s Oscar nominated and Annie winning animations ‘The Secret of Kells’ and ‘The Song of the Sea’.  Kíla were also nominated for an Emmy in 2015 for their soundtrack to the film “Ireland’s Wild River” which had the enviable title of being “The best wildlife film in the world of the past two years”.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Lavender Rights Project
Seattle, WA

SAVE THE DATE! This June, we’re bringing you ALL T, ALL SHADE for PRIDE! Lavender Rights Project will be hosting a night of laughs and celebration at Northwest Film Forum on the evening of June 22nd, 2022. Make sure you keep an eye out for purchasing tickets because in-person seating will be limited, but there will be a virtual option for the community.

If you want to help sponsor this event by way of supporting the comedic acts, venue expenses, helping with promotion, and/or volunteering, please email randy@lavenderrightsproject.org.

If you know that you can’t attend this event but still want to support and/or donate, please email development@lavenderrightsproject.org. Or go to our donation link in the bio and set your donation to the amount of your choosing.

SEE YOU SOON, COMMUNITY!

IG: Lavenderrightsproject

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Town Hall Seattle
Seattle, WA

The tragedies and reckonings around racism that have rocked our country have created a specific crisis for parents and other caregivers: How do we talk to our children about racism? How do we raise our children to avoid repeating our racist history and the ongoing errors of the present? While we do the work of dismantling racist behaviors in ourselves and the world around us, how do we raise our children to be antiracists?

These are all questions Dr. Kendi had been asking himself ever since he became a teacher — but the question became more personal and urgent when he found out his partner, Sadiqa, was pregnant. Like many parents, he didn’t know how to answer the question — and wasn’t sure he wanted to. He didn’t want to educate his child on antiracism; he wanted to shield her from the toxicity of racism altogether.

With research and experience, Dr. Kendi changed his mind. He realized that antiracism has to be taught and modeled as early as possible — not just to armor children against the racism still indoctrinated and normalized in their world, but to remind parents and caregivers to build a more just future for us all.

In How to Raise an Antiracist, Kendi combines vital scholarship with a compelling personal narrative of his journey as a parent to create a work grounded in research and relatable real-world experience. The chapters follow the stages of child development from pregnancy to teenager; they don’t just help parents to raise antiracists, but also to create an antiracist world where they can grow and thrive.

Dr. Ibram X. Kendi is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University and the founding director of the BU Center for Antiracist Research. He is a contributing writer at The Atlantic and a CBS News racial justice contributor. He is the host of the new action podcast Be Antiracist. Dr. Kendi is the author of many highly acclaimed books including Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction, making him the youngest-ever winner of that award. He has also produced five straight #1 New York Times bestsellers, including How to Be an Antiracist, Antiracist Baby, and Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You, co-authored by Jason Reynolds. In 2020, Time magazine named Dr. Kendi one of the 100 most influential people in the world. He was awarded a 2021 MacArthur Fellowship, popularly known as the Genius Grant.

A livestream of this event will also be available

View Event
Seattle International Dance Festival
An Explosion of Dance at Seattle International Dance Festival
Broadway Performance Hall (Seattle, WA)
There’s perhaps no more universal language than dance, and now you can experience the dazzling movements and rhythms of the world’s most innovative contemporary dancers at the 13th annual Seattle International Dance Festival. Stretching to three full weeks of activities, this year’s event at Broadway Performance Hall will showcase thrilling and innovative works from dozens of international artists, along with the best homegrown talent. The festival also brings back the inaugural James Ray Residency Project, which showcases five all-new works by Seattle-based dance artists, and Art on the Fly, a popular outdoor event that celebrates all forms of art with dance classes, food vendors, live performances and other interactive events. Get this 17-day festival started on the right foot as you join the rest of the dance-loving general public at the first-ever Opening Night Party and Shuffle, courtesy of SIDF and “City Arts Magazine”. Check out the Description section for a full schedule of events.
Saturday, Jun 9, 2018 / 8:00pm (Idan Cohen & KT Niehoff) | $12.50
Sunday, Jun 10, 2018 / 7:30pm (Khambatta Dance Company & Three Yells) | $12.50
Friday, Jun 15, 2018 / 8:00pm (Ouro Collective and Karin Stevens Dance) | COMP – $12.50
Saturday, Jun 16, 2018 / 8:00pm (T42 and Jenifer Salk) | COMP – $12.50
Tuesday, Jun 19, 2018 / 7:30pm (Spotlight on Contemporary Ballet) | $12.50
Thursday, Jun 21, 2018 / 7:30pm (Spotlight on Seattle NOW) | $12.50
Friday, Jun 22, 2018 / 8:00pm (Joshua Beamish and Alex Crozier) | $12.50
Saturday, Jun 23, 2018 / 8:00pm (III2 and Catapult Dance) | $12.50
View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
African Community Housing and Development
Seattle, WA

2022 Season Starts MAY 14th!
See you there!

2nd & 4th Saturdays
May through October
10am – 2pm

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
Seattle Center Festál
virtual

Seattle Center Festál presents Seattle Iranian Festival in partnership with Iranian American Community Alliance (IACA). The festival brings together Iranians, Iranian-Americans, non-Iranians in celebration of the culture with poetry, music, food, tea, comedy, and more.

This event is free and open to the public.

HISTORY

2006 was the first year the active members of the Iranian community joined hand-in-hand with the board members of the Iranian American Community Alliance (IACA) to organize an event that has now become the annual Seattle Iranian Festival. IACA, as an organization, came from a vision the founder, Ali Ghambari had for the future of the Iranian generation here in the greater Seattle area. As parents, they already knew their roots and maintained their heritage through their household and upbringing of their children, but what about the generation of their grandchildren? That is when Ali and a selected group of Iranians formed the IACA organization to not only bridge the gap between the Iranian and the American communities, but to create an established organization for the existing community and the next generations. IACA has remained a well-established grassroots organization dedicated to organizing its largest event of the year, Seattle Iranian Festival, while supporting other organizations and events.

The Iranian American Community Alliance (IACA) is a Seattle-based, 501(c)(3) non-profit, community organization focused on cultural and educational programs, like Seattle Iranian Festival, and youth and leadership development through mentorship and service. It was founded in 2005.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Iranians were pioneer carpet weavers of the ancient world.
  • Prior to the 1930s, Iran was called Persia.
  • Persian (Farsi) is the official language of Iran. However, other languages are spoken throughout the country, including Turkic, Kurdish, Gilaki, and Arabic.
  • Iran is one of the world’s oldest continuous civilizations, with settlements back to 4000 B.C.
  • Approximately 70% of Iran’s population is under the age of 30.
  • Iran is one of the world’s largest producers of caviar, pistachios, and saffron.
  • Iranians make up Iran (61%), followed by Azeri (16%), Kurd (10%), Lur (6%), Baloch (2%), Arab (2%), Turkmen and Turkic tribes (2%), and other (1%).
  • The most popular sport in Iran is soccer. The national team also known as Team Melli, has won the Asian Cup three times and played in three World Cup Final competitions.
  • Polo was played in Iran as early as the 6th Century B.C., mainly as training for the cavalry.
  • Gardens permeate Iranian culture & history.
  • Iran is the most populous country in the Middle East at about 82 million people and practice different faiths, despite Iran’s Islamic Republic government practices and misconceptions all Iranians are conservative Muslims. Christians, Jews, Muslims, Zoroastrians and Bahai’s all live in Iran.
View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event

The Henry is pleased to present the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. Henry staff conduct two studio visits and work closely with the students to facilitate their projects and prepare them for exhibition at the museum. A digital publication is produced in conjunction with the exhibition to highlight the students’ artistic endeavors and the Henry’s commitment to this exciting and important step in the students’ development as practicing artists and designers.

View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
virtual

Tuesday, JUNE 28, 2022 | 5:30 PM PST | Zoom | FREE

Join friends near and far as you compete for prizes on Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Island themed trivia. Play from home via Zoom and Crowdpurr.

To play, you will need access to a computer and a mobile device. Or, if you are a dynamo, access to view split screens on your computer.

*Top winner receives a $25 gift card to a local business or a large surprise box of themed items. Other two runner ups will receive gift items or swag.

A Zoom link will be sent to your email after you register with extra information on how to connect on Crowdpurr. You will be able to interact with our staff during the program.

Free. Donations accepted.

Presented by the Tateuchi Foundation and IMLS.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event
Event
Organization
Location
Hilltop Artists
Tacoma, WA

Representing nearly 30 years of youth development and creative cultivation through glassblowing, GATHER includes work from 21 Hilltop Artists alumni with artistic practices rooted in the Tacoma community.

Featuring a variety of contemporary glass artworks from vessels and sculptures to neon and installations as well as paintings and mixed media, GATHER highlights the outcomes and reach of the Hilltop Artists program while shining a light on opportunity gaps faced by these artists, many of whom have not yet been included in exhibitions on this scale. Curated by Trenton Quiocho, Hilltop Artist alum (2008), and current Teaching Artist. Presented in collaboration with Tacoma Art Museum.

GATHER: 27 Years of Hilltop Artists will be on view at TAM from March 26 through September 4, 2022.

Stay tuned for events throughout the run of the exhibition!

LEARN MORE AT TACOMAARTMUSEUM.ORG.

Artists featured in GATHER include: Douglas Jan Burgess II, Dale Chihuly, Candida Delgadillo, Taylor Haunhorst, Daria Hembree, Jessica Hogan, Dani Kaes, Cassandra Kuring, Emily Martin, Jason McDonald, Jason Mouer, Shayne Nutter, Trenton Quiocho, David Rios, Luis Sanchez, Samantha Scalise, Italo Scanga, Evan Schauss, Zane Scott, Ellye Sevier, Tony Sorgenfrei, Jesse Sorgenfrei, Jack Spitzer, Edgar Valentine, and Jacob Willcox.

View Event
Washington State Historical Society
Tacoma, WA
  • WHERE:
    Fifth Floor
  • TICKETS:

    Purchase tickets at the museum’s admissions desk or online.

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos los Sacrificios Que has Hecho
    A Project by Borderland Collective
    February 5 – October 16, 2022

    All the Sacrifices You’ve Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho is a collaboration between students and staff from the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington and Borderland Collective, an arts collective from Texas. Participants curated photos from their family albums, made new photographs, and recorded their oral histories. The resulting exhibition creates a uniquely personal connection between the viewer and the families and serves as an acknowledgment of the contributions, resilience, joys, and sacrifices made by farmworkers from the Eastern Washington agricultural regions of Yakima and Wenatchee.

    Hear from Borderland Collective’s curators Jason Reed and Mark Menjivar along with Luz M. Iginuez, former director of CAMP at the University of Washington, in this program presented on Jan. 29, 2022:

    The exhibition was created by Borderland Collective’s Mark Menjivar and Jason Reed with CAMP staff and students including Luz Iniguez, Natalia Esquivel Silva, Orfil Olmos, Gabriela Ruiz, Moises Mendez, and Alondra Torres.

    In the adjacent gallery, this contemporary exhibition is complemented by a selection of archival items from the Washington State Historical Society’s collections exploring the political and economic histories of land and labor in the region.

    When the All The Sacrifices You Have Made / Todos Los Sacrificios Que Has Hecho ends, the family photographs and oral histories will be added to the WSHS permanent collections, preserving these meaningful histories for generations to come. 

View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA

This focused selection for the Henry’s mezzanine features recent photographs by Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) that represent his interest in how pictures are made, seen, and circulated. It is presented on the occasion of Sepuya’s 2022 Monsen Photography Lecture, occurring June 17, 2022. This annual presentation brings key makers and thinkers in photographic practice to the Henry. Named after Dr. Elaine Monsen, the series is designed to further knowledge about and appreciation for the art of photography.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya (b. 1982, San Bernardino, CA) is a Los Angeles-based artist working in photography and Associate Professor in Media Arts at the University of California, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Guggenheim Museums; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Recent exhibitions include solo presentations at Vielmetter Los Angeles and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, a survey of work at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, and a project for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. Most recently, Sepuya’s solo exhibition, Stage, was on view at Document in Chicago, and a publication co-curated and produced with TBW Books is forthcoming.

View Event
Across his artistic practice, ektor garcia (b. 1985, Red Bluff, California) challenges the hierarchies of gendered and racialized labor, combining a queer punk sensibility with the handcraft traditions of Mexico, his ancestral homeland.
In textiles, ceramics, and metalwork, frequently in combination with found materials, garcia engages vernacular and craft practices historically cast in diminutive or marginalized roles, ascribing renewed value through intimate, ritual processes. The resulting objects are hybrid in nature—both malleable and solid, dense and porous, sharp and tender—evoking the body and its labor as a source of pleasure and pain, rupture and healing. Pieces are often reconfigured; textiles are made and unmade. Undoing the knots is as important as reknotting to find new points of connection and possibility. For his exhibition at the Henry, garcia worked with faculty, staff, and students at the University of Washington’s Ceramic and Metal Arts Building to create a series of new linked-chain sculptures made in ceramic, copper, and glass. Comprised of individual, interlocking links, these chains will form a series of mutual and contingent relationships across their constitutive parts as they suspend and drape throughout the double-height volume of the gallery. Integrated among the linked-chain sculptures, garcia will install a collection of objects from his Mexico City studio, along with butterflies made of crocheted copper wire that escape the confines of the gallery and inhabit interstitial spaces of the museum. A complimentary exhibition publication will accompany the exhibition.
View Event
Henry Art Gallery
Seattle , WA
View Event
Native Arts & Cultures Foundation (NACF)
Portland, OR

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition at the Center for Native Arts and Cultures in Portland, Oregon. “Where the Waters Come Together” explores Indigenous perspectives of our relationships with rivers and oceans. The exhibition features Native artists responding to fundamental questions around cultural buoyancy, biodiversity protection, food sources and material necessities, and the realities of the colonial reshaping of traditional access to waterways and shorelines.

Native artists across the country have been responding to social and environmental issues that affect them and their communities. They are drawing increased attention to Native perspectives in shifting a national narrative of invisibility, misunderstanding and misappropriation. Clear in all of this work are our essential relationships to land-base. Through this lens, Native artists in the exhibition employ several mediums, including two and three-dimensional works, installations and multi-media works, moving fluidly between contemporary and traditional practices.

EXHIBITION – APRIL 22-JUNE 30, 2022

WHEN: Wednesdays-Fridays 11:00 AM-6:00 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-4:00 PM (PST)
WHERE: Center for Native Arts and Cultures, 800 SE 10th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

* This event is free and open to the public.

View Event
PIER 62 | FREE
TUESDAY MAY 17, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 7, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUN 21, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 5, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM
TUESDAY JUL 19, 2022 FROM 5:30–6:30 PM

Storytelling has been the primary way that Native people have passed along knowledge, from how to conduct yourself to the details of historical events. Join Paul Chiyokten Wagner (Saanich) as he presents traditional songs and stories of his Coast Salish tribal ancestors, interspersed with his award‑winning Native American flute playing. Sessions are held the first and third Tuesday through July.

View Event